Individual Differences in the Movement-Mood Relationship in Digital Life Data

Glen Coppersmith, Alex Fine, Patrick Crutchley, Joshua Carroll


Abstract
Our increasingly digitized lives generate troves of data that reflect our behavior, beliefs, mood, and wellbeing. Such “digital life data” provides crucial insight into the lives of patients outside the healthcare setting that has long been lacking, from a better understanding of mundane patterns of exercise and sleep routines to harbingers of emotional crisis. Moreover, information about individual differences and personalities is encoded in digital life data. In this paper we examine the relationship between mood and movement using linguistic and biometric data, respectively. Does increased physical activity (movement) have an effect on a person’s mood (or vice-versa)? We find that weak group-level relationships between movement and mood mask interesting and often strong relationships between the two for individuals within the group. We describe these individual differences, and argue that individual variability in the relationship between movement and mood is one of many such factors that ought be taken into account in wellbeing-focused apps and AI systems.
Anthology ID:
2021.clpsych-1.3
Volume:
Proceedings of the Seventh Workshop on Computational Linguistics and Clinical Psychology: Improving Access
Month:
June
Year:
2021
Address:
Online
Venues:
CLPsych | NAACL
SIG:
Publisher:
Association for Computational Linguistics
Note:
Pages:
25–31
Language:
URL:
https://aclanthology.org/2021.clpsych-1.3
DOI:
10.18653/v1/2021.clpsych-1.3
Bibkey:
Cite (ACL):
Glen Coppersmith, Alex Fine, Patrick Crutchley, and Joshua Carroll. 2021. Individual Differences in the Movement-Mood Relationship in Digital Life Data. In Proceedings of the Seventh Workshop on Computational Linguistics and Clinical Psychology: Improving Access, pages 25–31, Online. Association for Computational Linguistics.
Cite (Informal):
Individual Differences in the Movement-Mood Relationship in Digital Life Data (Coppersmith et al., CLPsych 2021)
Copy Citation:
PDF:
https://aclanthology.org/2021.clpsych-1.3.pdf