The Myth of Signing Avatars

John C. McDonald, Rosalee Wolfe, Eleni Efthimiou, Evita Fontinea, Frankie Picron, Davy Van Landuyt, Tina Sioen, Annelies Braffort, Michael Filhol, Sarah Ebling, Thomas Hanke, Verena Krausneker


Abstract
Development of automatic translation between signed and spoken languages has lagged behind the development of automatic translation between spoken languages, but it is a common misperception that extending machine translation techniques to include signed languages should be a straightforward process. A contributing factor is the lack of an acceptable method for displaying sign language apart from interpreters on video. This position paper examines the challenges of displaying a signed language as a target in automatic translation, analyses the underlying causes and suggests strategies to develop display technologies that are acceptable to sign language communities.
Anthology ID:
2021.mtsummit-at4ssl.4
Volume:
Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Automatic Translation for Signed and Spoken Languages (AT4SSL)
Month:
August
Year:
2021
Address:
Virtual
Venue:
MTSummit
SIG:
Publisher:
Association for Machine Translation in the Americas
Note:
Pages:
33–42
Language:
URL:
https://aclanthology.org/2021.mtsummit-at4ssl.4
DOI:
Bibkey:
Cite (ACL):
John C. McDonald, Rosalee Wolfe, Eleni Efthimiou, Evita Fontinea, Frankie Picron, Davy Van Landuyt, Tina Sioen, Annelies Braffort, Michael Filhol, Sarah Ebling, Thomas Hanke, and Verena Krausneker. 2021. The Myth of Signing Avatars. In Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Automatic Translation for Signed and Spoken Languages (AT4SSL), pages 33–42, Virtual. Association for Machine Translation in the Americas.
Cite (Informal):
The Myth of Signing Avatars (McDonald et al., MTSummit 2021)
Copy Citation:
PDF:
https://aclanthology.org/2021.mtsummit-at4ssl.4.pdf