You might think about slightly revising the title”: Identifying Hedges in Peer-tutoring Interactions

Yann Raphalen, Chloé Clavel, Justine Cassell


Abstract
Hedges have an important role in the management of rapport. In peer-tutoring, they are notably used by tutors in dyads experiencing low rapport to tone down the impact of instructions and negative feedback.Pursuing the objective of building a tutoring agent that manages rapport with teenagers in order to improve learning, we used a multimodal peer-tutoring dataset to construct a computational framework for identifying hedges. We compared approaches relying on pre-trained resources with others that integrate insights from the social science literature. Our best performance involved a hybrid approach that outperforms the existing baseline while being easier to interpret. We employ a model explainability tool to explore the features that characterize hedges in peer-tutoring conversations, and we identify some novel features, and the benefits of a such a hybrid model approach.
Anthology ID:
2022.acl-long.153
Volume:
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)
Month:
May
Year:
2022
Address:
Dublin, Ireland
Venue:
ACL
SIG:
Publisher:
Association for Computational Linguistics
Note:
Pages:
2160–2174
Language:
URL:
https://aclanthology.org/2022.acl-long.153
DOI:
10.18653/v1/2022.acl-long.153
Bibkey:
Cite (ACL):
Yann Raphalen, Chloé Clavel, and Justine Cassell. 2022. “You might think about slightly revising the title”: Identifying Hedges in Peer-tutoring Interactions. In Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers), pages 2160–2174, Dublin, Ireland. Association for Computational Linguistics.
Cite (Informal):
“You might think about slightly revising the title”: Identifying Hedges in Peer-tutoring Interactions (Raphalen et al., ACL 2022)
Copy Citation:
PDF:
https://aclanthology.org/2022.acl-long.153.pdf