Ali Farhadi


2022

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Exposing the Limits of Video-Text Models through Contrast Sets
Jae Sung Park | Sheng Shen | Ali Farhadi | Trevor Darrell | Yejin Choi | Anna Rohrbach
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Recent video-text models can retrieve relevant videos based on text with a high accuracy, but to what extent do they comprehend the semantics of the text? Can they discriminate between similar entities and actions? To answer this, we propose an evaluation framework that probes video-text models with hard negatives. We automatically build contrast sets, where true textual descriptions are manipulated in ways that change their semantics while maintaining plausibility. Specifically, we leverage a pre-trained language model and a set of heuristics to create verb and person entity focused contrast sets. We apply these in the multiple choice video to-text classification setting. We test the robustness of recent methods on the proposed automatic contrast sets, and compare them to additionally collected human-generated counterparts, to assess their effectiveness. We see that model performance suffers across all methods, erasing the gap between recent CLIP-based methods vs. the earlier methods.

2021

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PIGLeT: Language Grounding Through Neuro-Symbolic Interaction in a 3D World
Rowan Zellers | Ari Holtzman | Matthew Peters | Roozbeh Mottaghi | Aniruddha Kembhavi | Ali Farhadi | Yejin Choi
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

We propose PIGLeT: a model that learns physical commonsense knowledge through interaction, and then uses this knowledge to ground language. We factorize PIGLeT into a physical dynamics model, and a separate language model. Our dynamics model learns not just what objects are but also what they do: glass cups break when thrown, plastic ones don’t. We then use it as the interface to our language model, giving us a unified model of linguistic form and grounded meaning. PIGLeT can read a sentence, simulate neurally what might happen next, and then communicate that result through a literal symbolic representation, or natural language. Experimental results show that our model effectively learns world dynamics, along with how to communicate them. It is able to correctly forecast what happens next given an English sentence over 80% of the time, outperforming a 100x larger, text-to-text approach by over 10%. Likewise, its natural language summaries of physical interactions are also judged by humans as more accurate than LM alternatives. We present comprehensive analysis showing room for future work.

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TuringAdvice: A Generative and Dynamic Evaluation of Language Use
Rowan Zellers | Ari Holtzman | Elizabeth Clark | Lianhui Qin | Ali Farhadi | Yejin Choi
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

We propose TuringAdvice, a new challenge task and dataset for language understanding models. Given a written situation that a real person is currently facing, a model must generate helpful advice in natural language. Our evaluation framework tests a fundamental aspect of human language understanding: our ability to use language to resolve open-ended situations by communicating with each other. Empirical results show that today’s models struggle at TuringAdvice, even multibillion parameter models finetuned on 600k in-domain training examples. The best model, T5, writes advice that is at least as helpful as human-written advice in only 14% of cases; a much larger non-finetunable GPT3 model does even worse at 4%. This low performance reveals language understanding errors that are hard to spot outside of a generative setting, showing much room for progress.

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Probing Contextual Language Models for Common Ground with Visual Representations
Gabriel Ilharco | Rowan Zellers | Ali Farhadi | Hannaneh Hajishirzi
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

The success of large-scale contextual language models has attracted great interest in probing what is encoded in their representations. In this work, we consider a new question: to what extent contextual representations of concrete nouns are aligned with corresponding visual representations? We design a probing model that evaluates how effective are text-only representations in distinguishing between matching and non-matching visual representations. Our findings show that language representations alone provide a strong signal for retrieving image patches from the correct object categories. Moreover, they are effective in retrieving specific instances of image patches; textual context plays an important role in this process. Visually grounded language models slightly outperform text-only language models in instance retrieval, but greatly under-perform humans. We hope our analyses inspire future research in understanding and improving the visual capabilities of language models.

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Iconary: A Pictionary-Based Game for Testing Multimodal Communication with Drawings and Text
Christopher Clark | Jordi Salvador | Dustin Schwenk | Derrick Bonafilia | Mark Yatskar | Eric Kolve | Alvaro Herrasti | Jonghyun Choi | Sachin Mehta | Sam Skjonsberg | Carissa Schoenick | Aaron Sarnat | Hannaneh Hajishirzi | Aniruddha Kembhavi | Oren Etzioni | Ali Farhadi
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Communicating with humans is challenging for AIs because it requires a shared understanding of the world, complex semantics (e.g., metaphors or analogies), and at times multi-modal gestures (e.g., pointing with a finger, or an arrow in a diagram). We investigate these challenges in the context of Iconary, a collaborative game of drawing and guessing based on Pictionary, that poses a novel challenge for the research community. In Iconary, a Guesser tries to identify a phrase that a Drawer is drawing by composing icons, and the Drawer iteratively revises the drawing to help the Guesser in response. This back-and-forth often uses canonical scenes, visual metaphor, or icon compositions to express challenging words, making it an ideal test for mixing language and visual/symbolic communication in AI. We propose models to play Iconary and train them on over 55,000 games between human players. Our models are skillful players and are able to employ world knowledge in language models to play with words unseen during training.

2019

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Real-Time Open-Domain Question Answering with Dense-Sparse Phrase Index
Minjoon Seo | Jinhyuk Lee | Tom Kwiatkowski | Ankur Parikh | Ali Farhadi | Hannaneh Hajishirzi
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Existing open-domain question answering (QA) models are not suitable for real-time usage because they need to process several long documents on-demand for every input query, which is computationally prohibitive. In this paper, we introduce query-agnostic indexable representations of document phrases that can drastically speed up open-domain QA. In particular, our dense-sparse phrase encoding effectively captures syntactic, semantic, and lexical information of the phrases and eliminates the pipeline filtering of context documents. Leveraging strategies for optimizing training and inference time, our model can be trained and deployed even in a single 4-GPU server. Moreover, by representing phrases as pointers to their start and end tokens, our model indexes phrases in the entire English Wikipedia (up to 60 billion phrases) using under 2TB. Our experiments on SQuAD-Open show that our model is on par with or more accurate than previous models with 6000x reduced computational cost, which translates into at least 68x faster end-to-end inference benchmark on CPUs. Code and demo are available at nlp.cs.washington.edu/denspi

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HellaSwag: Can a Machine Really Finish Your Sentence?
Rowan Zellers | Ari Holtzman | Yonatan Bisk | Ali Farhadi | Yejin Choi
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Recent work by Zellers et al. (2018) introduced a new task of commonsense natural language inference: given an event description such as “A woman sits at a piano,” a machine must select the most likely followup: “She sets her fingers on the keys.” With the introduction of BERT, near human-level performance was reached. Does this mean that machines can perform human level commonsense inference? In this paper, we show that commonsense inference still proves difficult for even state-of-the-art models, by presenting HellaSwag, a new challenge dataset. Though its questions are trivial for humans (>95% accuracy), state-of-the-art models struggle (<48%). We achieve this via Adversarial Filtering (AF), a data collection paradigm wherein a series of discriminators iteratively select an adversarial set of machine-generated wrong answers. AF proves to be surprisingly robust. The key insight is to scale up the length and complexity of the dataset examples towards a critical ‘Goldilocks’ zone wherein generated text is ridiculous to humans, yet often misclassified by state-of-the-art models. Our construction of HellaSwag, and its resulting difficulty, sheds light on the inner workings of deep pretrained models. More broadly, it suggests a new path forward for NLP research, in which benchmarks co-evolve with the evolving state-of-the-art in an adversarial way, so as to present ever-harder challenges.

2018

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Phrase-Indexed Question Answering: A New Challenge for Scalable Document Comprehension
Minjoon Seo | Tom Kwiatkowski | Ankur Parikh | Ali Farhadi | Hannaneh Hajishirzi
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

We formalize a new modular variant of current question answering tasks by enforcing complete independence of the document encoder from the question encoder. This formulation addresses a key challenge in machine comprehension by building a standalone representation of the document discourse. It additionally leads to a significant scalability advantage since the encoding of the answer candidate phrases in the document can be pre-computed and indexed offline for efficient retrieval. We experiment with baseline models for the new task, which achieve a reasonable accuracy but significantly underperform unconstrained QA models. We invite the QA research community to engage in Phrase-Indexed Question Answering (PIQA, pika) for closing the gap. The leaderboard is at: nlp.cs.washington.edu/piqa

2016

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Stating the Obvious: Extracting Visual Common Sense Knowledge
Mark Yatskar | Vicente Ordonez | Ali Farhadi
Proceedings of the 2016 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

2015

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Solving Geometry Problems: Combining Text and Diagram Interpretation
Minjoon Seo | Hannaneh Hajishirzi | Ali Farhadi | Oren Etzioni | Clint Malcolm
Proceedings of the 2015 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

2014

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Multi-Resolution Language Grounding with Weak Supervision
R. Koncel-Kedziorski | Hannaneh Hajishirzi | Ali Farhadi
Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)