André F. T. Martins

Also published as: Andre F. T. Martins, Andre Martins, André F.T. Martins, André Martins


2022

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Searching for COMETINHO: The Little Metric That Could
Ricardo Rei | Ana C Farinha | José G.C. de Souza | Pedro G. Ramos | André F.T. Martins | Luisa Coheur | Alon Lavie
Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the European Association for Machine Translation

In recent years, several neural fine-tuned machine translation evaluation metrics such as COMET and BLEURT have been proposed. These metrics achieve much higher correlations with human judgments than lexical overlap metrics at the cost of computational efficiency and simplicity, limiting their applications to scenarios in which one has to score thousands of translation hypothesis (e.g. scoring multiple systems or Minimum Bayes Risk decoding). In this paper, we explore optimization techniques, pruning, and knowledge distillation to create more compact and faster COMET versions. Our results show that just by optimizing the code through the use of caching and length batching we can reduce inference time between 39% and 65% when scoring multiple systems. Also, we show that pruning COMET can lead to a 21% model reduction without affecting the model’s accuracy beyond 0.01 Kendall tau correlation. Furthermore, we present DISTIL-COMET a lightweight distilled version that is 80% smaller and 2.128x faster while attaining a performance close to the original model and above strong baselines such as BERTSCORE and PRISM.

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QUARTZ: Quality-Aware Machine Translation
José G.C. de Souza | Ricardo Rei | Ana C. Farinha | Helena Moniz | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the European Association for Machine Translation

This paper presents QUARTZ, QUality-AwaRe machine Translation, a project led by Unbabel which aims at developing machine translation systems that are more robust and produce fewer critical errors. With QUARTZ we want to enable machine translation for user-generated conversational content types that do not tolerate critical errors in automatic translations.

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DeepSPIN: Deep Structured Prediction for Natural Language Processing
André F. T. Martins | Ben Peters | Chrysoula Zerva | Chunchuan Lyu | Gonçalo Correia | Marcos Treviso | Pedro Martins | Tsvetomila Mihaylova
Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the European Association for Machine Translation

DeepSPIN is a research project funded by the European Research Council (ERC) whose goal is to develop new neural structured prediction methods, models, and algorithms for improving the quality, interpretability, and data-efficiency of natural language processing (NLP) systems, with special emphasis on machine translation and quality estimation. We describe in this paper the latest findings from this project.

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Quality-Aware Decoding for Neural Machine Translation
Patrick Fernandes | António Farinhas | Ricardo Rei | José De Souza | Perez Ogayo | Graham Neubig | Andre Martins
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Despite the progress in machine translation quality estimation and evaluation in the last years, decoding in neural machine translation (NMT) is mostly oblivious to this and centers around finding the most probable translation according to the model (MAP decoding), approximated with beam search. In this paper, we bring together these two lines of research and propose quality-aware decoding for NMT, by leveraging recent breakthroughs in reference-free and reference-based MT evaluation through various inference methods like N-best reranking and minimum Bayes risk decoding. We perform an extensive comparison of various possible candidate generation and ranking methods across four datasets and two model classes and find that quality-aware decoding consistently outperforms MAP-based decoding according both to state-of-the-art automatic metrics (COMET and BLEURT) and to human assessments.

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Proceedings of the Sixth Workshop on Structured Prediction for NLP
Andreas Vlachos | Priyanka Agrawal | André Martins | Gerasimos Lampouras | Chunchuan Lyu
Proceedings of the Sixth Workshop on Structured Prediction for NLP

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Predicting Attention Sparsity in Transformers
Marcos Treviso | António Góis | Patrick Fernandes | Erick Fonseca | Andre Martins
Proceedings of the Sixth Workshop on Structured Prediction for NLP

Transformers’ quadratic complexity with respect to the input sequence length has motivated a body of work on efficient sparse approximations to softmax. An alternative path, used by entmax transformers, consists of having built-in exact sparse attention; however this approach still requires quadratic computation. In this paper, we propose Sparsefinder, a simple model trained to identify the sparsity pattern of entmax attention before computing it. We experiment with three variants of our method, based on distances, quantization, and clustering, on two tasks: machine translation (attention in the decoder) and masked language modeling (encoder-only). Our work provides a new angle to study model efficiency by doing extensive analysis of the tradeoff between the sparsity and recall of the predicted attention graph. This allows for detailed comparison between different models along their Pareto curves, important to guide future benchmarks for sparse attention models.

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-former: Infinite Memory Transformer
Pedro Henrique Martins | Zita Marinho | Andre Martins
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Transformers are unable to model long-term memories effectively, since the amount of computation they need to perform grows with the context length. While variations of efficient transformers have been proposed, they all have a finite memory capacity and are forced to drop old information. In this paper, we propose the -former, which extends the vanilla transformer with an unbounded long-term memory. By making use of a continuous-space attention mechanism to attend over the long-term memory, the -former’s attention complexity becomes independent of the context length, trading off memory length with precision.In order to control where precision is more important, -former maintains “sticky memories,” being able to model arbitrarily long contexts while keeping the computation budget fixed.Experiments on a synthetic sorting task, language modeling, and document grounded dialogue generation demonstrate the -former’s ability to retain information from long sequences.

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Beyond Characters: Subword-level Morpheme Segmentation
Ben Peters | Andre F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 19th SIGMORPHON Workshop on Computational Research in Phonetics, Phonology, and Morphology

This paper presents DeepSPIN’s submissions to the SIGMORPHON 2022 Shared Task on Morpheme Segmentation. We make three submissions, all to the word-level subtask. First, we show that entmax-based sparse sequence-tosequence models deliver large improvements over conventional softmax-based models, echoing results from other tasks. Then, we challenge the assumption that models for morphological tasks should be trained at the character level by building a transformer that generates morphemes as sequences of unigram language model-induced subwords. This subword transformer outperforms all of our character-level models and wins the word-level subtask. Although we do not submit an official submission to the sentence-level subtask, we show that this subword-based approach is highly effective there as well.

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Efficient Machine Translation Domain Adaptation
Pedro Martins | Zita Marinho | Andre Martins
Proceedings of the 1st Workshop on Semiparametric Methods in NLP: Decoupling Logic from Knowledge

Machine translation models struggle when translating out-of-domain text, which makes domain adaptation a topic of critical importance. However, most domain adaptation methods focus on fine-tuning or training the entire or part of the model on every new domain, which can be costly. On the other hand, semi-parametric models have been shown to successfully perform domain adaptation by retrieving examples from an in-domain datastore (Khandelwal et al., 2021). A drawback of these retrieval-augmented models, however, is that they tend to be substantially slower. In this paper, we explore several approaches to speed up nearest neighbors machine translation. We adapt the methods recently proposed by He et al. (2021) for language modeling, and introduce a simple but effective caching strategy that avoids performing retrieval when similar contexts have been seen before. Translation quality and runtimes for several domains show the effectiveness of the proposed solutions.

2021

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IST-Unbabel 2021 Submission for the Explainable Quality Estimation Shared Task
Marcos Treviso | Nuno M. Guerreiro | Ricardo Rei | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Evaluation and Comparison of NLP Systems

We present the joint contribution of Instituto Superior Técnico (IST) and Unbabel to the Explainable Quality Estimation (QE) shared task, where systems were submitted to two tracks: constrained (without word-level supervision) and unconstrained (with word-level supervision). For the constrained track, we experimented with several explainability methods to extract the relevance of input tokens from sentence-level QE models built on top of multilingual pre-trained transformers. Among the different tested methods, composing explanations in the form of attention weights scaled by the norm of value vectors yielded the best results. When word-level labels are used during training, our best results were obtained by using word-level predicted probabilities. We further improve the performance of our methods on the two tracks by ensembling explanation scores extracted from models trained with different pre-trained transformers, achieving strong results for in-domain and zero-shot language pairs.

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Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Machine Translation
Loic Barrault | Ondrej Bojar | Fethi Bougares | Rajen Chatterjee | Marta R. Costa-jussa | Christian Federmann | Mark Fishel | Alexander Fraser | Markus Freitag | Yvette Graham | Roman Grundkiewicz | Paco Guzman | Barry Haddow | Matthias Huck | Antonio Jimeno Yepes | Philipp Koehn | Tom Kocmi | Andre Martins | Makoto Morishita | Christof Monz
Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Machine Translation

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Findings of the WMT 2021 Shared Task on Quality Estimation
Lucia Specia | Frédéric Blain | Marina Fomicheva | Chrysoula Zerva | Zhenhao Li | Vishrav Chaudhary | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Machine Translation

We report the results of the WMT 2021 shared task on Quality Estimation, where the challenge is to predict the quality of the output of neural machine translation systems at the word and sentence levels. This edition focused on two main novel additions: (i) prediction for unseen languages, i.e. zero-shot settings, and (ii) prediction of sentences with catastrophic errors. In addition, new data was released for a number of languages, especially post-edited data. Participating teams from 19 institutions submitted altogether 1263 systems to different task variants and language pairs.

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IST-Unbabel 2021 Submission for the Quality Estimation Shared Task
Chrysoula Zerva | Daan van Stigt | Ricardo Rei | Ana C Farinha | Pedro Ramos | José G. C. de Souza | Taisiya Glushkova | Miguel Vera | Fabio Kepler | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Machine Translation

We present the joint contribution of IST and Unbabel to the WMT 2021 Shared Task on Quality Estimation. Our team participated on two tasks: Direct Assessment and Post-Editing Effort, encompassing a total of 35 submissions. For all submissions, our efforts focused on training multilingual models on top of OpenKiwi predictor-estimator architecture, using pre-trained multilingual encoders combined with adapters. We further experiment with and uncertainty-related objectives and features as well as training on out-of-domain direct assessment data.

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Are References Really Needed? Unbabel-IST 2021 Submission for the Metrics Shared Task
Ricardo Rei | Ana C Farinha | Chrysoula Zerva | Daan van Stigt | Craig Stewart | Pedro Ramos | Taisiya Glushkova | André F. T. Martins | Alon Lavie
Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Machine Translation

In this paper, we present the joint contribution of Unbabel and IST to the WMT 2021 Metrics Shared Task. With this year’s focus on Multidimensional Quality Metric (MQM) as the ground-truth human assessment, our aim was to steer COMET towards higher correlations with MQM. We do so by first pre-training on Direct Assessments and then fine-tuning on z-normalized MQM scores. In our experiments we also show that reference-free COMET models are becoming competitive with reference-based models, even outperforming the best COMET model from 2020 on this year’s development data. Additionally, we present COMETinho, a lightweight COMET model that is 19x faster on CPU than the original model, while also achieving state-of-the-art correlations with MQM. Finally, in the “QE as a metric” track, we also participated with a QE model trained using the OpenKiwi framework leveraging MQM scores and word-level annotations.

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Do Context-Aware Translation Models Pay the Right Attention?
Kayo Yin | Patrick Fernandes | Danish Pruthi | Aditi Chaudhary | André F. T. Martins | Graham Neubig
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Context-aware machine translation models are designed to leverage contextual information, but often fail to do so. As a result, they inaccurately disambiguate pronouns and polysemous words that require context for resolution. In this paper, we ask several questions: What contexts do human translators use to resolve ambiguous words? Are models paying large amounts of attention to the same context? What if we explicitly train them to do so? To answer these questions, we introduce SCAT (Supporting Context for Ambiguous Translations), a new English-French dataset comprising supporting context words for 14K translations that professional translators found useful for pronoun disambiguation. Using SCAT, we perform an in-depth analysis of the context used to disambiguate, examining positional and lexical characteristics of the supporting words. Furthermore, we measure the degree of alignment between the model’s attention scores and the supporting context from SCAT, and apply a guided attention strategy to encourage agreement between the two.

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Measuring and Increasing Context Usage in Context-Aware Machine Translation
Patrick Fernandes | Kayo Yin | Graham Neubig | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Recent work in neural machine translation has demonstrated both the necessity and feasibility of using inter-sentential context, context from sentences other than those currently being translated. However, while many current methods present model architectures that theoretically can use this extra context, it is often not clear how much they do actually utilize it at translation time. In this paper, we introduce a new metric, conditional cross-mutual information, to quantify usage of context by these models. Using this metric, we measure how much document-level machine translation systems use particular varieties of context. We find that target context is referenced more than source context, and that including more context has a diminishing affect on results. We then introduce a new, simple training method, context-aware word dropout, to increase the usage of context by context-aware models. Experiments show that our method not only increases context usage, but also improves the translation quality according to metrics such as BLEU and COMET, as well as performance on anaphoric pronoun resolution and lexical cohesion contrastive datasets.

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Uncertainty-Aware Machine Translation Evaluation
Taisiya Glushkova | Chrysoula Zerva | Ricardo Rei | André F. T. Martins
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2021

Several neural-based metrics have been recently proposed to evaluate machine translation quality. However, all of them resort to point estimates, which provide limited information at segment level. This is made worse as they are trained on noisy, biased and scarce human judgements, often resulting in unreliable quality predictions. In this paper, we introduce uncertainty-aware MT evaluation and analyze the trustworthiness of the predicted quality. We combine the COMET framework with two uncertainty estimation methods, Monte Carlo dropout and deep ensembles, to obtain quality scores along with confidence intervals. We compare the performance of our uncertainty-aware MT evaluation methods across multiple language pairs from the QT21 dataset and the WMT20 metrics task, augmented with MQM annotations. We experiment with varying numbers of references and further discuss the usefulness of uncertainty-aware quality estimation (without references) to flag possibly critical translation mistakes.

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Proceedings of the 5th Workshop on Structured Prediction for NLP (SPNLP 2021)
Zornitsa Kozareva | Sujith Ravi | Andreas Vlachos | Priyanka Agrawal | André Martins
Proceedings of the 5th Workshop on Structured Prediction for NLP (SPNLP 2021)

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Smoothing and Shrinking the Sparse Seq2Seq Search Space
Ben Peters | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Current sequence-to-sequence models are trained to minimize cross-entropy and use softmax to compute the locally normalized probabilities over target sequences. While this setup has led to strong results in a variety of tasks, one unsatisfying aspect is its length bias: models give high scores to short, inadequate hypotheses and often make the empty string the argmax—the so-called cat got your tongue problem. Recently proposed entmax-based sparse sequence-to-sequence models present a possible solution, since they can shrink the search space by assigning zero probability to bad hypotheses, but their ability to handle word-level tasks with transformers has never been tested. In this work, we show that entmax-based models effectively solve the cat got your tongue problem, removing a major source of model error for neural machine translation. In addition, we generalize label smoothing, a critical regularization technique, to the broader family of Fenchel-Young losses, which includes both cross-entropy and the entmax losses. Our resulting label-smoothed entmax loss models set a new state of the art on multilingual grapheme-to-phoneme conversion and deliver improvements and better calibration properties on cross-lingual morphological inflection and machine translation for 7 language pairs.

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SPECTRA: Sparse Structured Text Rationalization
Nuno M. Guerreiro | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Selective rationalization aims to produce decisions along with rationales (e.g., text highlights or word alignments between two sentences). Commonly, rationales are modeled as stochastic binary masks, requiring sampling-based gradient estimators, which complicates training and requires careful hyperparameter tuning. Sparse attention mechanisms are a deterministic alternative, but they lack a way to regularize the rationale extraction (e.g., to control the sparsity of a text highlight or the number of alignments). In this paper, we present a unified framework for deterministic extraction of structured explanations via constrained inference on a factor graph, forming a differentiable layer. Our approach greatly eases training and rationale regularization, generally outperforming previous work on what comes to performance and plausibility of the extracted rationales. We further provide a comparative study of stochastic and deterministic methods for rationale extraction for classification and natural language inference tasks, jointly assessing their predictive power, quality of the explanations, and model variability.

2020

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Understanding the Mechanics of SPIGOT: Surrogate Gradients for Latent Structure Learning
Tsvetomila Mihaylova | Vlad Niculae | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

Latent structure models are a powerful tool for modeling language data: they can mitigate the error propagation and annotation bottleneck in pipeline systems, while simultaneously uncovering linguistic insights about the data. One challenge with end-to-end training of these models is the argmax operation, which has null gradient. In this paper, we focus on surrogate gradients, a popular strategy to deal with this problem. We explore latent structure learning through the angle of pulling back the downstream learning objective. In this paradigm, we discover a principled motivation for both the straight-through estimator (STE) as well as the recently-proposed SPIGOT – a variant of STE for structured models. Our perspective leads to new algorithms in the same family. We empirically compare the known and the novel pulled-back estimators against the popular alternatives, yielding new insight for practitioners and revealing intriguing failure cases.

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Sparse Text Generation
Pedro Henrique Martins | Zita Marinho | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

Current state-of-the-art text generators build on powerful language models such as GPT-2, achieving impressive performance. However, to avoid degenerate text, they require sampling from a modified softmax, via temperature parameters or ad-hoc truncation techniques, as in top-k or nucleus sampling. This creates a mismatch between training and testing conditions. In this paper, we use the recently introduced entmax transformation to train and sample from a natively sparse language model, avoiding this mismatch. The result is a text generator with favorable performance in terms of fluency and consistency, fewer repetitions, and n-gram diversity closer to human text. In order to evaluate our model, we propose three new metrics for comparing sparse or truncated distributions: 𝜖-perplexity, sparsemax score, and Jensen-Shannon divergence. Human-evaluated experiments in story completion and dialogue generation show that entmax sampling leads to more engaging and coherent stories and conversations.

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Revisiting Higher-Order Dependency Parsers
Erick Fonseca | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Neural encoders have allowed dependency parsers to shift from higher-order structured models to simpler first-order ones, making decoding faster and still achieving better accuracy than non-neural parsers. This has led to a belief that neural encoders can implicitly encode structural constraints, such as siblings and grandparents in a tree. We tested this hypothesis and found that neural parsers may benefit from higher-order features, even when employing a powerful pre-trained encoder, such as BERT. While the gains of higher-order features are small in the presence of a powerful encoder, they are consistent for long-range dependencies and long sentences. In particular, higher-order models are more accurate on full sentence parses and on the exact match of modifier lists, indicating that they deal better with larger, more complex structures.

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Proceedings of the Fourth Workshop on Structured Prediction for NLP
Priyanka Agrawal | Zornitsa Kozareva | Julia Kreutzer | Gerasimos Lampouras | André Martins | Sujith Ravi | Andreas Vlachos
Proceedings of the Fourth Workshop on Structured Prediction for NLP

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Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the European Association for Machine Translation
André Martins | Helena Moniz | Sara Fumega | Bruno Martins | Fernando Batista | Luisa Coheur | Carla Parra | Isabel Trancoso | Marco Turchi | Arianna Bisazza | Joss Moorkens | Ana Guerberof | Mary Nurminen | Lena Marg | Mikel L. Forcada
Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the European Association for Machine Translation

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Learning Non-Monotonic Automatic Post-Editing of Translations from Human Orderings
António Góis | Kyunghyun Cho | André Martins
Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the European Association for Machine Translation

Recent research in neural machine translation has explored flexible generation orders, as an alternative to left-to-right generation. However, training non-monotonic models brings a new complication: how to search for a good ordering when there is a combinatorial explosion of orderings arriving at the same final result? Also, how do these automatic orderings compare with the actual behaviour of human translators? Current models rely on manually built biases or are left to explore all possibilities on their own. In this paper, we analyze the orderings produced by human post-editors and use them to train an automatic post-editing system. We compare the resulting system with those trained with left-to-right and random post-editing orderings. We observe that humans tend to follow a nearly left-to-right order, but with interesting deviations, such as preferring to start by correcting punctuation or verbs.

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Document-level Neural MT: A Systematic Comparison
António Lopes | M. Amin Farajian | Rachel Bawden | Michael Zhang | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the European Association for Machine Translation

In this paper we provide a systematic comparison of existing and new document-level neural machine translation solutions. As part of this comparison, we introduce and evaluate a document-level variant of the recently proposed Star Transformer architecture. In addition to using the traditional metric BLEU, we report the accuracy of the models in handling anaphoric pronoun translation as well as coherence and cohesion using contrastive test sets. Finally, we report the results of human evaluation in terms of Multidimensional Quality Metrics (MQM) and analyse the correlation of the results obtained by the automatic metrics with human judgments.

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DeepSPIN: Deep Structured Prediction for Natural Language Processing
André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the European Association for Machine Translation

DeepSPIN is a research project funded by the European Research Council (ERC) whose goal is to develop new neural structured prediction methods, models, and algorithms for improving the quality, interpretability, and data-efficiency of natural language processing (NLP) systems, with special emphasis on machine translation and quality estimation applications.

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Project MAIA: Multilingual AI Agent Assistant
André F. T. Martins | Joao Graca | Paulo Dimas | Helena Moniz | Graham Neubig
Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the European Association for Machine Translation

This paper presents the Multilingual Artificial Intelligence Agent Assistant (MAIA), a project led by Unbabel with the collaboration of CMU, INESC-ID and IT Lisbon. MAIA will employ cutting-edge machine learning and natural language processing technologies to build multilingual AI agent assistants, eliminating language barriers. MAIA’s translation layer will empower human agents to provide customer support in real-time, in any language, with human quality.

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Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Machine Translation
Loïc Barrault | Ondřej Bojar | Fethi Bougares | Rajen Chatterjee | Marta R. Costa-jussà | Christian Federmann | Mark Fishel | Alexander Fraser | Yvette Graham | Paco Guzman | Barry Haddow | Matthias Huck | Antonio Jimeno Yepes | Philipp Koehn | André Martins | Makoto Morishita | Christof Monz | Masaaki Nagata | Toshiaki Nakazawa | Matteo Negri
Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Machine Translation

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Findings of the WMT 2020 Shared Task on Chat Translation
M. Amin Farajian | António V. Lopes | André F. T. Martins | Sameen Maruf | Gholamreza Haffari
Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Machine Translation

We report the results of the first edition of the WMT shared task on chat translation. The task consisted of translating bilingual conversational text, in particular customer support chats for the English-German language pair (English agent, German customer). This task varies from the other translation shared tasks, i.e. news and biomedical, mainly due to the fact that the conversations are bilingual, less planned, more informal, and often ungrammatical. Furthermore, such conversations are usually characterized by shorter and simpler sentences and contain more pronouns. We received 14 submissions from 6 participating teams, all of them covering both directions, i.e. En->De for agent utterances and De->En for customer messages. We used automatic metrics (BLEU and TER) for evaluating the translations of both agent and customer messages and human document-level direct assessments (DDA) to evaluate the agent translations.

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Findings of the WMT 2020 Shared Task on Quality Estimation
Lucia Specia | Frédéric Blain | Marina Fomicheva | Erick Fonseca | Vishrav Chaudhary | Francisco Guzmán | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Machine Translation

We report the results of the WMT20 shared task on Quality Estimation, where the challenge is to predict the quality of the output of neural machine translation systems at the word, sentence and document levels. This edition included new data with open domain texts, direct assessment annotations, and multiple language pairs: English-German, English-Chinese, Russian-English, Romanian-English, Estonian-English, Sinhala-English and Nepali-English data for the sentence-level subtasks, English-German and English-Chinese for the word-level subtask, and English-French data for the document-level subtask. In addition, we made neural machine translation models available to participants. 19 participating teams from 27 institutions submitted altogether 1374 systems to different task variants and language pairs.

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IST-Unbabel Participation in the WMT20 Quality Estimation Shared Task
João Moura | Miguel Vera | Daan van Stigt | Fabio Kepler | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Machine Translation

We present the joint contribution of IST and Unbabel to the WMT 2020 Shared Task on Quality Estimation. Our team participated on all tracks (Direct Assessment, Post-Editing Effort, Document-Level), encompassing a total of 14 submissions. Our submitted systems were developed by extending the OpenKiwi framework to a transformer-based predictor-estimator architecture, and to cope with glass-box, uncertainty-based features coming from neural machine translation systems.

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One-Size-Fits-All Multilingual Models
Ben Peters | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 17th SIGMORPHON Workshop on Computational Research in Phonetics, Phonology, and Morphology

This paper presents DeepSPIN’s submissions to Tasks 0 and 1 of the SIGMORPHON 2020 Shared Task. For both tasks, we present multilingual models, training jointly on data in all languages. We perform no language-specific hyperparameter tuning – each of our submissions uses the same model for all languages. Our basic architecture is the sparse sequence-to-sequence model with entmax attention and loss, which allows our models to learn sparse, local alignments while still being trainable with gradient-based techniques. For Task 1, we achieve strong performance with both RNN- and transformer-based sparse models. For Task 0, we extend our RNN-based model to a multi-encoder set-up in which separate modules encode the lemma and inflection sequences. Despite our models’ lack of language-specific tuning, they tie for first in Task 0 and place third in Task 1.

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The Explanation Game: Towards Prediction Explainability through Sparse Communication
Marcos Treviso | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the Third BlackboxNLP Workshop on Analyzing and Interpreting Neural Networks for NLP

Explainability is a topic of growing importance in NLP. In this work, we provide a unified perspective of explainability as a communication problem between an explainer and a layperson about a classifier’s decision. We use this framework to compare several explainers, including gradient methods, erasure, and attention mechanisms, in terms of their communication success. In addition, we reinterpret these methods in the light of classical feature selection, and use this as inspiration for new embedded explainers, through the use of selective, sparse attention. Experiments in text classification and natural language inference, using different configurations of explainers and laypeople (including both machines and humans), reveal an advantage of attention-based explainers over gradient and erasure methods, and show that selective attention is a simpler alternative to stochastic rationalizers. Human experiments show strong results on text classification with post-hoc explainers trained to optimize communication success.

2019

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Selective Attention for Context-aware Neural Machine Translation
Sameen Maruf | André F. T. Martins | Gholamreza Haffari
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 1 (Long and Short Papers)

Despite the progress made in sentence-level NMT, current systems still fall short at achieving fluent, good quality translation for a full document. Recent works in context-aware NMT consider only a few previous sentences as context and may not scale to entire documents. To this end, we propose a novel and scalable top-down approach to hierarchical attention for context-aware NMT which uses sparse attention to selectively focus on relevant sentences in the document context and then attends to key words in those sentences. We also propose single-level attention approaches based on sentence or word-level information in the context. The document-level context representation, produced from these attention modules, is integrated into the encoder or decoder of the Transformer model depending on whether we use monolingual or bilingual context. Our experiments and evaluation on English-German datasets in different document MT settings show that our selective attention approach not only significantly outperforms context-agnostic baselines but also surpasses context-aware baselines in most cases.

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Jointly Extracting and Compressing Documents with Summary State Representations
Afonso Mendes | Shashi Narayan | Sebastião Miranda | Zita Marinho | André F. T. Martins | Shay B. Cohen
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 1 (Long and Short Papers)

We present a new neural model for text summarization that first extracts sentences from a document and then compresses them. The pro-posed model offers a balance that sidesteps thedifficulties in abstractive methods while gener-ating more concise summaries than extractivemethods. In addition, our model dynamically determines the length of the output summary based on the gold summaries it observes during training and does not require length constraints typical to extractive summarization. The model achieves state-of-the-art results on the CNN/DailyMail and Newsroom datasets, improving over current extractive and abstractive methods. Human evaluations demonstratethat our model generates concise and informa-tive summaries. We also make available a new dataset of oracle compressive summaries derived automatically from the CNN/DailyMailreference summaries.

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Adaptively Sparse Transformers
Gonçalo M. Correia | Vlad Niculae | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing and the 9th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (EMNLP-IJCNLP)

Attention mechanisms have become ubiquitous in NLP. Recent architectures, notably the Transformer, learn powerful context-aware word representations through layered, multi-headed attention. The multiple heads learn diverse types of word relationships. However, with standard softmax attention, all attention heads are dense, assigning a non-zero weight to all context words. In this work, we introduce the adaptively sparse Transformer, wherein attention heads have flexible, context-dependent sparsity patterns. This sparsity is accomplished by replacing softmax with alpha-entmax: a differentiable generalization of softmax that allows low-scoring words to receive precisely zero weight. Moreover, we derive a method to automatically learn the alpha parameter – which controls the shape and sparsity of alpha-entmax – allowing attention heads to choose between focused or spread-out behavior. Our adaptively sparse Transformer improves interpretability and head diversity when compared to softmax Transformers on machine translation datasets. Findings of the quantitative and qualitative analysis of our approach include that heads in different layers learn different sparsity preferences and tend to be more diverse in their attention distributions than softmax Transformers. Furthermore, at no cost in accuracy, sparsity in attention heads helps to uncover different head specializations.

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Proceedings of the Third Workshop on Structured Prediction for NLP
Andre Martins | Andreas Vlachos | Zornitsa Kozareva | Sujith Ravi | Gerasimos Lampouras | Vlad Niculae | Julia Kreutzer
Proceedings of the Third Workshop on Structured Prediction for NLP

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ITIST at the SIGMORPHON 2019 Shared Task: Sparse Two-headed Models for Inflection
Ben Peters | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 16th Workshop on Computational Research in Phonetics, Phonology, and Morphology

This paper presents the Instituto de Telecomunicações–Instituto Superior Técnico submission to Task 1 of the SIGMORPHON 2019 Shared Task. Our models combine sparse sequence-to-sequence models with a two-headed attention mechanism that learns separate attention distributions for the lemma and inflectional tags. Among submissions to Task 1, our models rank second and third. Despite the low data setting of the task (only 100 in-language training examples), they learn plausible inflection patterns and often concentrate all probability mass into a small set of hypotheses, making beam search exact.

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Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Machine Translation (Volume 1: Research Papers)
Ondřej Bojar | Rajen Chatterjee | Christian Federmann | Mark Fishel | Yvette Graham | Barry Haddow | Matthias Huck | Antonio Jimeno Yepes | Philipp Koehn | André Martins | Christof Monz | Matteo Negri | Aurélie Névéol | Mariana Neves | Matt Post | Marco Turchi | Karin Verspoor
Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Machine Translation (Volume 1: Research Papers)

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Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Machine Translation (Volume 2: Shared Task Papers, Day 1)
Ondřej Bojar | Rajen Chatterjee | Christian Federmann | Mark Fishel | Yvette Graham | Barry Haddow | Matthias Huck | Antonio Jimeno Yepes | Philipp Koehn | André Martins | Christof Monz | Matteo Negri | Aurélie Névéol | Mariana Neves | Matt Post | Marco Turchi | Karin Verspoor
Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Machine Translation (Volume 2: Shared Task Papers, Day 1)

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Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Machine Translation (Volume 3: Shared Task Papers, Day 2)
Ondřej Bojar | Rajen Chatterjee | Christian Federmann | Mark Fishel | Yvette Graham | Barry Haddow | Matthias Huck | Antonio Jimeno Yepes | Philipp Koehn | André Martins | Christof Monz | Matteo Negri | Aurélie Névéol | Mariana Neves | Matt Post | Marco Turchi | Karin Verspoor
Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Machine Translation (Volume 3: Shared Task Papers, Day 2)

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Findings of the WMT 2019 Shared Tasks on Quality Estimation
Erick Fonseca | Lisa Yankovskaya | André F. T. Martins | Mark Fishel | Christian Federmann
Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Machine Translation (Volume 3: Shared Task Papers, Day 2)

We report the results of the WMT19 shared task on Quality Estimation, i.e. the task of predicting the quality of the output of machine translation systems given just the source text and the hypothesis translations. The task includes estimation at three granularity levels: word, sentence and document. A novel addition is evaluating sentence-level QE against human judgments: in other words, designing MT metrics that do not need a reference translation. This year we include three language pairs, produced solely by neural machine translation systems. Participating teams from eleven institutions submitted a variety of systems to different task variants and language pairs.

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Unbabel’s Participation in the WMT19 Translation Quality Estimation Shared Task
Fabio Kepler | Jonay Trénous | Marcos Treviso | Miguel Vera | António Góis | M. Amin Farajian | António V. Lopes | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Machine Translation (Volume 3: Shared Task Papers, Day 2)

We present the contribution of the Unbabel team to the WMT 2019 Shared Task on Quality Estimation. We participated on the word, sentence, and document-level tracks, encompassing 3 language pairs: English-German, English-Russian, and English-French. Our submissions build upon the recent OpenKiwi framework: We combine linear, neural, and predictor-estimator systems with new transfer learning approaches using BERT and XLM pre-trained models. We compare systems individually and propose new ensemble techniques for word and sentence-level predictions. We also propose a simple technique for converting word labels into document-level predictions. Overall, our submitted systems achieve the best results on all tracks and language pairs by a considerable margin.

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Unbabel’s Submission to the WMT2019 APE Shared Task: BERT-Based Encoder-Decoder for Automatic Post-Editing
António V. Lopes | M. Amin Farajian | Gonçalo M. Correia | Jonay Trénous | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Machine Translation (Volume 3: Shared Task Papers, Day 2)

This paper describes Unbabel’s submission to the WMT2019 APE Shared Task for the English-German language pair. Following the recent rise of large, powerful, pre-trained models, we adapt the BERT pretrained model to perform Automatic Post-Editing in an encoder-decoder framework. Analogously to dual-encoder architectures we develop a BERT-based encoder-decoder (BED) model in which a single pretrained BERT encoder receives both the source src and machine translation mt strings. Furthermore, we explore a conservativeness factor to constrain the APE system to perform fewer edits. As the official results show, when trained on a weighted combination of in-domain and artificial training data, our BED system with the conservativeness penalty improves significantly the translations of a strong NMT system by -0.78 and +1.23 in terms of TER and BLEU, respectively. Finally, our submission achieves a new state-of-the-art, ex-aequo, in English-German APE of NMT.

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Translator2Vec: Understanding and Representing Human Post-Editors
António Góis | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of Machine Translation Summit XVII: Research Track

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Pivot Machine Translation in INTERACT Project
Chao-Hong Liu | Andy Way | Catarina Silva | André Martins
Proceedings of Machine Translation Summit XVII: Translator, Project and User Tracks

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Sparse Sequence-to-Sequence Models
Ben Peters | Vlad Niculae | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Sequence-to-sequence models are a powerful workhorse of NLP. Most variants employ a softmax transformation in both their attention mechanism and output layer, leading to dense alignments and strictly positive output probabilities. This density is wasteful, making models less interpretable and assigning probability mass to many implausible outputs. In this paper, we propose sparse sequence-to-sequence models, rooted in a new family of 𝛼-entmax transformations, which includes softmax and sparsemax as particular cases, and is sparse for any 𝛼 > 1. We provide fast algorithms to evaluate these transformations and their gradients, which scale well for large vocabulary sizes. Our models are able to produce sparse alignments and to assign nonzero probability to a short list of plausible outputs, sometimes rendering beam search exact. Experiments on morphological inflection and machine translation reveal consistent gains over dense models.

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A Simple and Effective Approach to Automatic Post-Editing with Transfer Learning
Gonçalo M. Correia | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Automatic post-editing (APE) seeks to automatically refine the output of a black-box machine translation (MT) system through human post-edits. APE systems are usually trained by complementing human post-edited data with large, artificial data generated through back-translations, a time-consuming process often no easier than training a MT system from scratch. in this paper, we propose an alternative where we fine-tune pre-trained BERT models on both the encoder and decoder of an APE system, exploring several parameter sharing strategies. By only training on a dataset of 23K sentences for 3 hours on a single GPU we obtain results that are competitive with systems that were trained on 5M artificial sentences. When we add this artificial data our method obtains state-of-the-art results.

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Joint Learning of Named Entity Recognition and Entity Linking
Pedro Henrique Martins | Zita Marinho | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Student Research Workshop

Named entity recognition (NER) and entity linking (EL) are two fundamentally related tasks, since in order to perform EL, first the mentions to entities have to be detected. However, most entity linking approaches disregard the mention detection part, assuming that the correct mentions have been previously detected. In this paper, we perform joint learning of NER and EL to leverage their relatedness and obtain a more robust and generalisable system. For that, we introduce a model inspired by the Stack-LSTM approach. We observe that, in fact, doing multi-task learning of NER and EL improves the performance in both tasks when comparing with models trained with individual objectives. Furthermore, we achieve results competitive with the state-of-the-art in both NER and EL.

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Scheduled Sampling for Transformers
Tsvetomila Mihaylova | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Student Research Workshop

Scheduled sampling is a technique for avoiding one of the known problems in sequence-to-sequence generation: exposure bias. It consists of feeding the model a mix of the teacher forced embeddings and the model predictions from the previous step in training time. The technique has been used for improving model performance with recurrent neural networks (RNN). In the Transformer model, unlike the RNN, the generation of a new word attends to the full sentence generated so far, not only to the last word, and it is not straightforward to apply the scheduled sampling technique. We propose some structural changes to allow scheduled sampling to be applied to Transformer architectures, via a two-pass decoding strategy. Experiments on two language pairs achieve performance close to a teacher-forcing baseline and show that this technique is promising for further exploration.

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OpenKiwi: An Open Source Framework for Quality Estimation
Fabio Kepler | Jonay Trénous | Marcos Treviso | Miguel Vera | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: System Demonstrations

We introduce OpenKiwi, a Pytorch-based open source framework for translation quality estimation. OpenKiwi supports training and testing of word-level and sentence-level quality estimation systems, implementing the winning systems of the WMT 2015–18 quality estimation campaigns. We benchmark OpenKiwi on two datasets from WMT 2018 (English-German SMT and NMT), yielding state-of-the-art performance on the word-level tasks and near state-of-the-art in the sentence-level tasks.

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Latent Structure Models for Natural Language Processing
André F. T. Martins | Tsvetomila Mihaylova | Nikita Nangia | Vlad Niculae
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Tutorial Abstracts

Latent structure models are a powerful tool for modeling compositional data, discovering linguistic structure, and building NLP pipelines. They are appealing for two main reasons: they allow incorporating structural bias during training, leading to more accurate models; and they allow discovering hidden linguistic structure, which provides better interpretability. This tutorial will cover recent advances in discrete latent structure models. We discuss their motivation, potential, and limitations, then explore in detail three strategies for designing such models: gradient approximation, reinforcement learning, and end-to-end differentiable methods. We highlight connections among all these methods, enumerating their strengths and weaknesses. The models we present and analyze have been applied to a wide variety of NLP tasks, including sentiment analysis, natural language inference, language modeling, machine translation, and semantic parsing. Examples and evaluation will be covered throughout. After attending the tutorial, a practitioner will be better informed about which method is best suited for their problem.

2018

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Sparse and Constrained Attention for Neural Machine Translation
Chaitanya Malaviya | Pedro Ferreira | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 2: Short Papers)

In neural machine translation, words are sometimes dropped from the source or generated repeatedly in the translation. We explore novel strategies to address the coverage problem that change only the attention transformation. Our approach allocates fertilities to source words, used to bound the attention each word can receive. We experiment with various sparse and constrained attention transformations and propose a new one, constrained sparsemax, shown to be differentiable and sparse. Empirical evaluation is provided in three languages pairs.

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Marian: Fast Neural Machine Translation in C++
Marcin Junczys-Dowmunt | Roman Grundkiewicz | Tomasz Dwojak | Hieu Hoang | Kenneth Heafield | Tom Neckermann | Frank Seide | Ulrich Germann | Alham Fikri Aji | Nikolay Bogoychev | André F. T. Martins | Alexandra Birch
Proceedings of ACL 2018, System Demonstrations

We present Marian, an efficient and self-contained Neural Machine Translation framework with an integrated automatic differentiation engine based on dynamic computation graphs. Marian is written entirely in C++. We describe the design of the encoder-decoder framework and demonstrate that a research-friendly toolkit can achieve high training and translation speed.

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Proceedings of the AMTA 2018 Workshop on Translation Quality Estimation and Automatic Post-Editing
Ramón Astudillo | João Graça | André Martins
Proceedings of the AMTA 2018 Workshop on Translation Quality Estimation and Automatic Post-Editing

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Interpretable Structure Induction via Sparse Attention
Ben Peters | Vlad Niculae | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 2018 EMNLP Workshop BlackboxNLP: Analyzing and Interpreting Neural Networks for NLP

Neural network methods are experiencing wide adoption in NLP, thanks to their empirical performance on many tasks. Modern neural architectures go way beyond simple feedforward and recurrent models: they are complex pipelines that perform soft, differentiable computation instead of discrete logic. The price of such soft computing is the introduction of dense dependencies, which make it hard to disentangle the patterns that trigger a prediction. Our recent work on sparse and structured latent computation presents a promising avenue for enhancing interpretability of such neural pipelines. Through this extended abstract, we aim to discuss and explore the potential and impact of our methods.

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Contextual Neural Model for Translating Bilingual Multi-Speaker Conversations
Sameen Maruf | André F. T. Martins | Gholamreza Haffari
Proceedings of the Third Conference on Machine Translation: Research Papers

Recent works in neural machine translation have begun to explore document translation. However, translating online multi-speaker conversations is still an open problem. In this work, we propose the task of translating Bilingual Multi-Speaker Conversations, and explore neural architectures which exploit both source and target-side conversation histories for this task. To initiate an evaluation for this task, we introduce datasets extracted from Europarl v7 and OpenSubtitles2016. Our experiments on four language-pairs confirm the significance of leveraging conversation history, both in terms of BLEU and manual evaluation.

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Findings of the WMT 2018 Shared Task on Quality Estimation
Lucia Specia | Frédéric Blain | Varvara Logacheva | Ramón F. Astudillo | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the Third Conference on Machine Translation: Shared Task Papers

We report the results of the WMT18 shared task on Quality Estimation, i.e. the task of predicting the quality of the output of machine translation systems at various granularity levels: word, phrase, sentence and document. This year we include four language pairs, three text domains, and translations produced by both statistical and neural machine translation systems. Participating teams from ten institutions submitted a variety of systems to different task variants and language pairs.

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Towards Dynamic Computation Graphs via Sparse Latent Structure
Vlad Niculae | André F. T. Martins | Claire Cardie
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Deep NLP models benefit from underlying structures in the data—e.g., parse trees—typically extracted using off-the-shelf parsers. Recent attempts to jointly learn the latent structure encounter a tradeoff: either make factorization assumptions that limit expressiveness, or sacrifice end-to-end differentiability. Using the recently proposed SparseMAP inference, which retrieves a sparse distribution over latent structures, we propose a novel approach for end-to-end learning of latent structure predictors jointly with a downstream predictor. To the best of our knowledge, our method is the first to enable unrestricted dynamic computation graph construction from the global latent structure, while maintaining differentiability.

2017

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Learning What’s Easy: Fully Differentiable Neural Easy-First Taggers
André F. T. Martins | Julia Kreutzer
Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

We introduce a novel neural easy-first decoder that learns to solve sequence tagging tasks in a flexible order. In contrast to previous easy-first decoders, our models are end-to-end differentiable. The decoder iteratively updates a “sketch” of the predictions over the sequence. At its core is an attention mechanism that controls which parts of the input are strategically the best to process next. We present a new constrained softmax transformation that ensures the same cumulative attention to every word, and show how to efficiently evaluate and backpropagate over it. Our models compare favourably to BILSTM taggers on three sequence tagging tasks.

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Pushing the Limits of Translation Quality Estimation
André F. T. Martins | Marcin Junczys-Dowmunt | Fabio N. Kepler | Ramón Astudillo | Chris Hokamp | Roman Grundkiewicz
Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics, Volume 5

Translation quality estimation is a task of growing importance in NLP, due to its potential to reduce post-editing human effort in disruptive ways. However, this potential is currently limited by the relatively low accuracy of existing systems. In this paper, we achieve remarkable improvements by exploiting synergies between the related tasks of word-level quality estimation and automatic post-editing. First, we stack a new, carefully engineered, neural model into a rich feature-based word-level quality estimation system. Then, we use the output of an automatic post-editing system as an extra feature, obtaining striking results on WMT16: a word-level FMULT1 score of 57.47% (an absolute gain of +7.95% over the current state of the art), and a Pearson correlation score of 65.56% for sentence-level HTER prediction (an absolute gain of +13.36%).

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Proceedings of the Software Demonstrations of the 15th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics
André Martins | Anselmo Peñas
Proceedings of the Software Demonstrations of the 15th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics

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Unbabel’s Participation in the WMT17 Translation Quality Estimation Shared Task
André F. T. Martins | Fabio Kepler | José Monteiro
Proceedings of the Second Conference on Machine Translation

2016

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Jointly Learning to Embed and Predict with Multiple Languages
Daniel C. Ferreira | André F. T. Martins | Mariana S. C. Almeida
Proceedings of the 54th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

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Semi-Supervised Learning of Sequence Models with Method of Moments
Zita Marinho | André F. T. Martins | Shay B. Cohen | Noah A. Smith
Proceedings of the 2016 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

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Unbabel’s Participation in the WMT16 Word-Level Translation Quality Estimation Shared Task
André F. T. Martins | Ramón Astudillo | Chris Hokamp | Fabio Kepler
Proceedings of the First Conference on Machine Translation: Volume 2, Shared Task Papers

2015

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Lisbon: Evaluating TurboSemanticParser on Multiple Languages and Out-of-Domain Data
Mariana S. C. Almeida | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation (SemEval 2015)

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Aligning Opinions: Cross-Lingual Opinion Mining with Dependencies
Mariana S. C. Almeida | Cláudia Pinto | Helena Figueira | Pedro Mendes | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 53rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 7th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

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Transferring Coreference Resolvers with Posterior Regularization
André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 53rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 7th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

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Parsing as Reduction
Daniel Fernández-González | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 53rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 7th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

2014

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Frame-Semantic Parsing
Dipanjan Das | Desai Chen | André F. T. Martins | Nathan Schneider | Noah A. Smith
Computational Linguistics, Volume 40, Issue 1 - March 2014

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A Joint Model for Quotation Attribution and Coreference Resolution
Mariana S. C. Almeida | Miguel B. Almeida | André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 14th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics

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Priberam Compressive Summarization Corpus: A New Multi-Document Summarization Corpus for European Portuguese
Miguel B. Almeida | Mariana S. C. Almeida | André F. T. Martins | Helena Figueira | Pedro Mendes | Cláudia Pinto
Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'14)

In this paper, we introduce the Priberam Compressive Summarization Corpus, a new multi-document summarization corpus for European Portuguese. The corpus follows the format of the summarization corpora for English in recent DUC and TAC conferences. It contains 80 manually chosen topics referring to events occurred between 2010 and 2013. Each topic contains 10 news stories from major Portuguese newspapers, radio and TV stations, along with two human generated summaries up to 100 words. Apart from the language, one important difference from the DUC/TAC setup is that the human summaries in our corpus are \emph{compressive}: the annotators performed only sentence and word deletion operations, as opposed to generating summaries from scratch. We use this corpus to train and evaluate learning-based extractive and compressive summarization systems, providing an empirical comparison between these two approaches. The corpus is made freely available in order to facilitate research on automatic summarization.

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Linear Programming Decoders in Natural Language Processing: From Integer Programming to Message Passing and Dual Decomposition
André F. T. Martins
Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing: Tutorial Abstracts

This tutorial will cover the theory and practice of linear programming decoders. This class of decoders encompasses a variety of techniques that have enjoyed great success in devising structured models for natural language processing (NLP). Along the tutorial, we provide a unified view of different algorithms and modeling techniques, including belief propagation, dual decomposition, integer linear programming, Markov logic, and constrained conditional models. Various applications in NLP will serve as a motivation.There is a long string of work using integer linear programming (ILP) formulations in NLP, for example in semantic role labeling, machine translation, summarization, dependency parsing, coreference resolution, and opinion mining, to name just a few. At the heart of these approaches is the ability to encode logic and budget constraints (common in NLP and information retrieval) as linear inequalities. Thanks to general purpose solvers (such as Gurobi, CPLEX, or GLPK), the practitioner can abstract away from the decoding algorithm and focus on developing a powerful model. A disadvantage, however, is that general solvers do not scale well to large problem instances, since they fail to exploit the structure of the problem.This is where graphical models come into play. In this tutorial, we show that most logic and budget constraints that arise in NLP can be cast in this framework. This opens the door for the use of message-passing algorithms, such as belief propagation and variants thereof. An alternative are algorithms based on dual decomposition, such as the subgradient method or AD3. These algorithms have achieved great success in a variety of applications, such as parsing, corpus-wide tagging, machine translation, summarization, joint coreference resolution and quotation attribution, and semantic role labeling. Interestingly, most decoders used in these works can be regarded as structure-aware solvers for addressing relaxations of integer linear programs. All these algorithms have a similar consensus-based architecture: they repeatedly perform certain "local" operations in the graph, until some form of local agreement is achieved. The local operations are performed at each factor, and they range between computing marginals, max-marginals, an optimal configuration, or a small quadratic problem, all of which are commonly tractable and efficient in a wide range of problems.As a companion of this tutorial, we provide an open-source implementation of some of the algorithms described above, available at http://www.ark.cs.cmu.edu/AD3.

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Priberam: A Turbo Semantic Parser with Second Order Features
André F. T. Martins | Mariana S. C. Almeida
Proceedings of the 8th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation (SemEval 2014)

2013

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Fast and Robust Compressive Summarization with Dual Decomposition and Multi-Task Learning
Miguel Almeida | André Martins
Proceedings of the 51st Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

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Turning on the Turbo: Fast Third-Order Non-Projective Turbo Parsers
André Martins | Miguel Almeida | Noah A. Smith
Proceedings of the 51st Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 2: Short Papers)

2012

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An Exact Dual Decomposition Algorithm for Shallow Semantic Parsing with Constraints
Dipanjan Das | André F. T. Martins | Noah A. Smith
*SEM 2012: The First Joint Conference on Lexical and Computational Semantics – Volume 1: Proceedings of the main conference and the shared task, and Volume 2: Proceedings of the Sixth International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation (SemEval 2012)

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Structured Sparsity in Natural Language Processing: Models, Algorithms and Applications
André F. T. Martins | Mário A. T. Figueiredo | Noah A. Smith
Tutorial Abstracts at the Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

2011

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Dual Decomposition with Many Overlapping Components
André Martins | Noah Smith | Mário Figueiredo | Pedro Aguiar
Proceedings of the 2011 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

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Structured Sparsity in Structured Prediction
André Martins | Noah Smith | Mário Figueiredo | Pedro Aguiar
Proceedings of the 2011 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

2010

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Turbo Parsers: Dependency Parsing by Approximate Variational Inference
André Martins | Noah Smith | Eric Xing | Pedro Aguiar | Mário Figueiredo
Proceedings of the 2010 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

2009

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Summarization with a Joint Model for Sentence Extraction and Compression
André Martins | Noah A. Smith
Proceedings of the Workshop on Integer Linear Programming for Natural Language Processing

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Concise Integer Linear Programming Formulations for Dependency Parsing
André Martins | Noah Smith | Eric Xing
Proceedings of the Joint Conference of the 47th Annual Meeting of the ACL and the 4th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing of the AFNLP

2004

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Design and Implementation of a Semantic Search Engine for Portuguese
Carlos Amaral | Dominique Laurent | André Martins | Afonso Mendes | Cláudia Pinto
Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC’04)

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