Bin He


2022

pdf bib
UniDS: A Unified Dialogue System for Chit-Chat and Task-oriented Dialogues
Xinyan Zhao | Bin He | Yasheng Wang | Yitong Li | Fei Mi | Yajiao Liu | Xin Jiang | Qun Liu | Huanhuan Chen
Proceedings of the Second DialDoc Workshop on Document-grounded Dialogue and Conversational Question Answering

With the advances in deep learning, tremendous progress has been made with chit-chat dialogue systems and task-oriented dialogue systems. However, these two systems are often tackled separately in current methods. To achieve more natural interaction with humans, dialogue systems need to be capable of both chatting and accomplishing tasks. To this end, we propose a unified dialogue system (UniDS) with the two aforementioned skills. In particular, we design a unified dialogue data schema, compatible for both chit-chat and task-oriented dialogues. Besides, we propose a two-stage training method to train UniDS based on the unified dialogue data schema. UniDS does not need to adding extra parameters to existing chit-chat dialogue systems. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed UniDS works comparably well as the state-of-the-art chit-chat dialogue systems and task-oriented dialogue systems. More importantly, UniDS achieves better robustness than pure dialogue systems and satisfactory switch ability between two types of dialogues.

pdf bib
KQA Pro: A Dataset with Explicit Compositional Programs for Complex Question Answering over Knowledge Base
Shulin Cao | Jiaxin Shi | Liangming Pan | Lunyiu Nie | Yutong Xiang | Lei Hou | Juanzi Li | Bin He | Hanwang Zhang
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Complex question answering over knowledge base (Complex KBQA) is challenging because it requires various compositional reasoning capabilities, such as multi-hop inference, attribute comparison, set operation, etc. Existing benchmarks have some shortcomings that limit the development of Complex KBQA: 1) they only provide QA pairs without explicit reasoning processes; 2) questions are poor in diversity or scale. To this end, we introduce KQA Pro, a dataset for Complex KBQA including around 120K diverse natural language questions. We introduce a compositional and interpretable programming language KoPL to represent the reasoning process of complex questions. For each question, we provide the corresponding KoPL program and SPARQL query, so that KQA Pro can serve for both KBQA and semantic parsing tasks. Experimental results show that state-of-the-art KBQA methods cannot achieve promising results on KQA Pro as on current datasets, which suggests that KQA Pro is challenging and Complex KBQA requires further research efforts. We also treat KQA Pro as a diagnostic dataset for testing multiple reasoning skills, conduct a thorough evaluation of existing models and discuss further directions for Complex KBQA. Our codes and datasets can be obtained from https://github.com/shijx12/KQAPro_Baselines.

2021

pdf bib
Benchmarking Commonsense Knowledge Base Population with an Effective Evaluation Dataset
Tianqing Fang | Weiqi Wang | Sehyun Choi | Shibo Hao | Hongming Zhang | Yangqiu Song | Bin He
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Reasoning over commonsense knowledge bases (CSKB) whose elements are in the form of free-text is an important yet hard task in NLP. While CSKB completion only fills the missing links within the domain of the CSKB, CSKB population is alternatively proposed with the goal of reasoning unseen assertions from external resources. In this task, CSKBs are grounded to a large-scale eventuality (activity, state, and event) graph to discriminate whether novel triples from the eventuality graph are plausible or not. However, existing evaluations on the population task are either not accurate (automatic evaluation with randomly sampled negative examples) or of small scale (human annotation). In this paper, we benchmark the CSKB population task with a new large-scale dataset by first aligning four popular CSKBs, and then presenting a high-quality human-annotated evaluation set to probe neural models’ commonsense reasoning ability. We also propose a novel inductive commonsense reasoning model that reasons over graphs. Experimental results show that generalizing commonsense reasoning on unseen assertions is inherently a hard task. Models achieving high accuracy during training perform poorly on the evaluation set, with a large gap between human performance. We will make the data publicly available for future contributions. Codes and data are available at https://github.com/HKUST-KnowComp/CSKB-Population.

pdf bib
A Global Past-Future Early Exit Method for Accelerating Inference of Pre-trained Language Models
Kaiyuan Liao | Yi Zhang | Xuancheng Ren | Qi Su | Xu Sun | Bin He
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Early exit mechanism aims to accelerate the inference speed of large-scale pre-trained language models. The essential idea is to exit early without passing through all the inference layers at the inference stage. To make accurate predictions for downstream tasks, the hierarchical linguistic information embedded in all layers should be jointly considered. However, much of the research up to now has been limited to use local representations of the exit layer. Such treatment inevitably loses information of the unused past layers as well as the high-level features embedded in future layers, leading to sub-optimal performance. To address this issue, we propose a novel Past-Future method to make comprehensive predictions from a global perspective. We first take into consideration all the linguistic information embedded in the past layers and then take a further step to engage the future information which is originally inaccessible for predictions. Extensive experiments demonstrate that our method outperforms previous early exit methods by a large margin, yielding better and robust performance.

pdf bib
Be Careful about Poisoned Word Embeddings: Exploring the Vulnerability of the Embedding Layers in NLP Models
Wenkai Yang | Lei Li | Zhiyuan Zhang | Xuancheng Ren | Xu Sun | Bin He
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Recent studies have revealed a security threat to natural language processing (NLP) models, called the Backdoor Attack. Victim models can maintain competitive performance on clean samples while behaving abnormally on samples with a specific trigger word inserted. Previous backdoor attacking methods usually assume that attackers have a certain degree of data knowledge, either the dataset which users would use or proxy datasets for a similar task, for implementing the data poisoning procedure. However, in this paper, we find that it is possible to hack the model in a data-free way by modifying one single word embedding vector, with almost no accuracy sacrificed on clean samples. Experimental results on sentiment analysis and sentence-pair classification tasks show that our method is more efficient and stealthier. We hope this work can raise the awareness of such a critical security risk hidden in the embedding layers of NLP models. Our code is available at https://github.com/lancopku/Embedding-Poisoning.

pdf bib
Neural Network Surgery: Injecting Data Patterns into Pre-trained Models with Minimal Instance-wise Side Effects
Zhiyuan Zhang | Xuancheng Ren | Qi Su | Xu Sun | Bin He
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Side effects during neural network tuning are typically measured by overall accuracy changes. However, we find that even with similar overall accuracy, existing tuning methods result in non-negligible instance-wise side effects. Motivated by neuroscientific evidence and theoretical results, we demonstrate that side effects can be controlled by the number of changed parameters and thus, we propose to conduct neural network surgery by only modifying a limited number of parameters. Neural network surgery can be realized using diverse techniques and we investigate three lines of methods. Experimental results on representative tuning problems validate the effectiveness of the surgery approach. The dynamic selecting method achieves the best overall performance that not only satisfies the tuning goal but also induces fewer instance-wise side effects by changing only 10-5 of the parameters.

2020

pdf bib
Pretrain-KGE: Learning Knowledge Representation from Pretrained Language Models
Zhiyuan Zhang | Xiaoqian Liu | Yi Zhang | Qi Su | Xu Sun | Bin He
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2020

Conventional knowledge graph embedding (KGE) often suffers from limited knowledge representation, leading to performance degradation especially on the low-resource problem. To remedy this, we propose to enrich knowledge representation via pretrained language models by leveraging world knowledge from pretrained models. Specifically, we present a universal training framework named Pretrain-KGE consisting of three phases: semantic-based fine-tuning phase, knowledge extracting phase and KGE training phase. Extensive experiments show that our proposed Pretrain-KGE can improve results over KGE models, especially on solving the low-resource problem.

pdf bib
BERT-MK: Integrating Graph Contextualized Knowledge into Pre-trained Language Models
Bin He | Di Zhou | Jinghui Xiao | Xin Jiang | Qun Liu | Nicholas Jing Yuan | Tong Xu
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2020

Complex node interactions are common in knowledge graphs (KGs), and these interactions can be considered as contextualized knowledge exists in the topological structure of KGs. Traditional knowledge representation learning (KRL) methods usually treat a single triple as a training unit, neglecting the usage of graph contextualized knowledge. To utilize these unexploited graph-level knowledge, we propose an approach to model subgraphs in a medical KG. Then, the learned knowledge is integrated with a pre-trained language model to do the knowledge generalization. Experimental results demonstrate that our model achieves the state-of-the-art performance on several medical NLP tasks, and the improvement above MedERNIE indicates that graph contextualized knowledge is beneficial.