Chao Li


2022

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Seeking Patterns, Not just Memorizing Procedures: Contrastive Learning for Solving Math Word Problems
Zhongli Li | Wenxuan Zhang | Chao Yan | Qingyu Zhou | Chao Li | Hongzhi Liu | Yunbo Cao
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL 2022

Math Word Problem (MWP) solving needs to discover the quantitative relationships over natural language narratives. Recent work shows that existing models memorize procedures from context and rely on shallow heuristics to solve MWPs. In this paper, we look at this issue and argue that the cause is a lack of overall understanding of MWP patterns. We first investigate how a neural network understands patterns only from semantics, and observe that, if the prototype equations are the same, most problems get closer representations and those representations apart from them or close to other prototypes tend to produce wrong solutions. Inspired by it, we propose a contrastive learning approach, where the neural network perceives the divergence of patterns. We collect contrastive examples by converting the prototype equation into a tree and seeking similar tree structures. The solving model is trained with an auxiliary objective on the collected examples, resulting in the representations of problems with similar prototypes being pulled closer. We conduct experiments on the Chinese dataset Math23k and the English dataset MathQA. Our method greatly improves the performance in monolingual and multilingual settings.

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The Past Mistake is the Future Wisdom: Error-driven Contrastive Probability Optimization for Chinese Spell Checking
Yinghui Li | Qingyu Zhou | Yangning Li | Zhongli Li | Ruiyang Liu | Rongyi Sun | Zizhen Wang | Chao Li | Yunbo Cao | Hai-Tao Zheng
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL 2022

Chinese Spell Checking (CSC) aims to detect and correct Chinese spelling errors, which are mainly caused by the phonological or visual similarity. Recently, pre-trained language models (PLMs) promote the progress of CSC task. However, there exists a gap between the learned knowledge of PLMs and the goal of CSC task. PLMs focus on the semantics in text and tend to correct the erroneous characters to semantically proper or commonly used ones, but these aren’t the ground-truth corrections. To address this issue, we propose an Error-driven COntrastive Probability Optimization (ECOPO) framework for CSC task. ECOPO refines the knowledge representations of PLMs, and guides the model to avoid predicting these common characters through an error-driven way. Particularly, ECOPO is model-agnostic and it can be combined with existing CSC methods to achieve better performance. Extensive experiments and detailed analyses on SIGHAN datasets demonstrate that ECOPO is simple yet effective.

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Type-Driven Multi-Turn Corrections for Grammatical Error Correction
Shaopeng Lai | Qingyu Zhou | Jiali Zeng | Zhongli Li | Chao Li | Yunbo Cao | Jinsong Su
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL 2022

Grammatical Error Correction (GEC) aims to automatically detect and correct grammatical errors. In this aspect, dominant models are trained by one-iteration learning while performing multiple iterations of corrections during inference. Previous studies mainly focus on the data augmentation approach to combat the exposure bias, which suffers from two drawbacks.First, they simply mix additionally-constructed training instances and original ones to train models, which fails to help models be explicitly aware of the procedure of gradual corrections. Second, they ignore the interdependence between different types of corrections.In this paper, we propose a Type-Driven Multi-Turn Corrections approach for GEC. Using this approach, from each training instance, we additionally construct multiple training instances, each of which involves the correction of a specific type of errors. Then, we use these additionally-constructed training instances and the original one to train the model in turn.Experimental results and in-depth analysis show that our approach significantly benefits the model training. Particularly, our enhanced model achieves state-of-the-art single-model performance on English GEC benchmarks. We release our code at Github.

2021

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Improving BERT with Syntax-aware Local Attention
Zhongli Li | Qingyu Zhou | Chao Li | Ke Xu | Yunbo Cao
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL-IJCNLP 2021

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Read, Listen, and See: Leveraging Multimodal Information Helps Chinese Spell Checking
Heng-Da Xu | Zhongli Li | Qingyu Zhou | Chao Li | Zizhen Wang | Yunbo Cao | Heyan Huang | Xian-Ling Mao
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL-IJCNLP 2021

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Diversity and Consistency: Exploring Visual Question-Answer Pair Generation
Sen Yang | Qingyu Zhou | Dawei Feng | Yang Liu | Chao Li | Yunbo Cao | Dongsheng Li
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2021

Although showing promising values to downstream applications, generating question and answer together is under-explored. In this paper, we introduce a novel task that targets question-answer pair generation from visual images. It requires not only generating diverse question-answer pairs but also keeping the consistency of them. We study different generation paradigms for this task and propose three models: the pipeline model, the joint model, and the sequential model. We integrate variational inference into these models to achieve diversity and consistency. We also propose region representation scaling and attention alignment to improve the consistency further. We finally devise an evaluator as a quantitative metric for consistency. We validate our approach on two benchmarks, VQA2.0 and Visual-7w, by automatically and manually evaluating diversity and consistency. Experimental results show the effectiveness of our models: they can generate diverse or consistent pairs. Moreover, this task can be used to improve visual question generation and visual question answering.

2020

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How Far Does BERT Look At: Distance-based Clustering and Analysis of BERT’s Attention
Yue Guan | Jingwen Leng | Chao Li | Quan Chen | Minyi Guo
Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

Recent research on the multi-head attention mechanism, especially that in pre-trained models such as BERT, has shown us heuristics and clues in analyzing various aspects of the mechanism. As most of the research focus on probing tasks or hidden states, previous works have found some primitive patterns of attention head behavior by heuristic analytical methods, but a more systematic analysis specific on the attention patterns still remains primitive. In this work, we clearly cluster the attention heatmaps into significantly different patterns through unsupervised clustering on top of a set of proposed features, which corroborates with previous observations. We further study their corresponding functions through analytical study. In addition, our proposed features can be used to explain and calibrate different attention heads in Transformer models.

2019

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Best Practices for Learning Domain-Specific Cross-Lingual Embeddings
Lena Shakurova | Beata Nyari | Chao Li | Mihai Rotaru
Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Representation Learning for NLP (RepL4NLP-2019)

Cross-lingual embeddings aim to represent words in multiple languages in a shared vector space by capturing semantic similarities across languages. They are a crucial component for scaling tasks to multiple languages by transferring knowledge from languages with rich resources to low-resource languages. A common approach to learning cross-lingual embeddings is to train monolingual embeddings separately for each language and learn a linear projection from the monolingual spaces into a shared space, where the mapping relies on a small seed dictionary. While there are high-quality generic seed dictionaries and pre-trained cross-lingual embeddings available for many language pairs, there is little research on how they perform on specialised tasks. In this paper, we investigate the best practices for constructing the seed dictionary for a specific domain. We evaluate the embeddings on the sequence labelling task of Curriculum Vitae parsing and show that the size of a bilingual dictionary, the frequency of the dictionary words in the domain corpora and the source of data (task-specific vs generic) influence performance. We also show that the less training data is available in the low-resource language, the more the construction of the bilingual dictionary matters, and demonstrate that some of the choices are crucial in the zero-shot transfer learning case.

2011

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Automatically Generating Questions from Queries for Community-based Question Answering
Shiqi Zhao | Haifeng Wang | Chao Li | Ting Liu | Yi Guan
Proceedings of 5th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing

2010

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Complete Syntactic Analysis Bases on Multi-level Chunking
Zhipeng Jiang | Yu Zhao | Yi Guan | Chao Li | Sheng Li
CIPS-SIGHAN Joint Conference on Chinese Language Processing