Chenghao Yang


2023

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Efficient Shapley Values Estimation by Amortization for Text Classification
Chenghao Yang | Fan Yin | He He | Kai-Wei Chang | Xiaofei Ma | Bing Xiang
Proceedings of the 61st Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Despite the popularity of Shapley Values in explaining neural text classification models, computing them is prohibitive for large pretrained models due to a large number of model evaluations. In practice, Shapley Values are often estimated with a small number of stochastic model evaluations. However, we show that the estimated Shapley Values are sensitive to random seed choices – the top-ranked features often have little overlap across different seeds, especially on examples with longer input texts. This can only be mitigated by aggregating thousands of model evaluations, which on the other hand, induces substantial computational overheads. To mitigate the trade-off between stability and efficiency, we develop an amortized model that directly predicts each input feature’s Shapley Value without additional model evaluations. It is trained on a set of examples whose Shapley Values are estimated from a large number of model evaluations to ensure stability. Experimental results on two text classification datasets demonstrate that our amortized model estimates Shapley Values accurately with up to 60 times speedup compared to traditional methods. Further, our model does not suffer from stability issues as inference is deterministic. We release our code at https://github.com/yangalan123/Amortized-Interpretability.

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ReCode: Robustness Evaluation of Code Generation Models
Shiqi Wang | Zheng Li | Haifeng Qian | Chenghao Yang | Zijian Wang | Mingyue Shang | Varun Kumar | Samson Tan | Baishakhi Ray | Parminder Bhatia | Ramesh Nallapati | Murali Krishna Ramanathan | Dan Roth | Bing Xiang
Proceedings of the 61st Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Code generation models have achieved impressive performance. However, they tend to be brittle as slight edits to a prompt could lead to very different generations; these robustness properties, critical for user experience when deployed in real-life applications, are not well understood. Most existing works on robustness in text or code tasks have focused on classification, while robustness in generation tasks is an uncharted area and to date there is no comprehensive benchmark for robustness in code generation. In this paper, we propose ReCode, a comprehensive robustness evaluation benchmark for code generation models. We customize over 30 transformations specifically for code on docstrings, function and variable names, code syntax, and code format. They are carefully designed to be natural in real-life coding practice, preserve the original semantic meaning, and thus provide multifaceted assessments of a model’s robustness performance. With human annotators, we verified that over 90% of the perturbed prompts do not alter the semantic meaning of the original prompt. In addition, we define robustness metrics for code generation models considering the worst-case behavior under each type of perturbation, taking advantage of the fact that executing the generated code can serve as objective evaluation. We demonstrate ReCode on SOTA models using HumanEval, MBPP, as well as function completion tasks derived from them. Interesting observations include: better robustness for CodeGen over InCoder and GPT-J; models are most sensitive to syntax perturbations; more challenging robustness evaluation on MBPP over HumanEval.

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Can You Follow Me? Testing Situational Understanding for ChatGPT
Chenghao Yang | Allyson Ettinger
Proceedings of the 2023 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Understanding sentence meanings and updating information states appropriately across time—what we call “situational understanding” (SU)—is a critical ability for human-like AI agents. SU is essential in particular for chat models, such as ChatGPT, to enable consistent, coherent, and effective dialogue between humans and AI. Previous works have identified certain SU limitations in non-chatbot Large Language models (LLMs), but the extent and causes of these limitations are not well understood, and capabilities of current chat-based models in this domain have not been explored. In this work we tackle these questions, proposing a novel synthetic environment for SU testing which allows us to do controlled and systematic testing of SU in chat-oriented models, through assessment of models’ ability to track and enumerate environment states. Our environment also allows for close analysis of dynamics of model performance, to better understand underlying causes for performance patterns. We apply our test to ChatGPT, the state-of-the-art chatbot, and find that despite the fundamental simplicity of the task, the model’s performance reflects an inability to retain correct environment states across time. Our follow-up analyses suggest that performance degradation is largely because ChatGPT has non-persistent in-context memory (although it can access the full dialogue history) and it is susceptible to hallucinated updates—including updates that artificially inflate accuracies. Our findings suggest overall that ChatGPT is not currently equipped for robust tracking of situation states, and that trust in the impressive dialogue performance of ChatGPT comes with risks. We release the codebase for reproducing our test environment, as well as all prompts and API responses from ChatGPT, at https://github.com/yangalan123/SituationalTesting.

2022

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Improving Stability of Fine-Tuning Pretrained Language Models via Component-Wise Gradient Norm Clipping
Chenghao Yang | Xuezhe Ma
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Fine-tuning over large pretrained language models (PLMs) has established many state-of-the-art results. Despite its superior performance, such fine-tuning can be unstable, resulting in significant variance in performance and potential risks for practical applications. Previous works have attributed such instability to the catastrophic forgetting problem in the top layers of PLMs, which indicates iteratively fine-tuning layers in a top-down manner is a promising solution. In this paper, we first point out that this method does not always work out due to the different convergence speeds of different layers/modules. Inspired by this observation, we propose a simple component-wise gradient norm clipping method to adjust the convergence speed for different components. Experiment results demonstrate that our method achieves consistent improvements in terms of generalization performance, convergence speed, and training stability. The codebase can be found at https://github.com/yangalan123/FineTuningStability.

2021

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Weakly-Supervised Methods for Suicide Risk Assessment: Role of Related Domains
Chenghao Yang | Yudong Zhang | Smaranda Muresan
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 2: Short Papers)

Social media has become a valuable resource for the study of suicidal ideation and the assessment of suicide risk. Among social media platforms, Reddit has emerged as the most promising one due to its anonymity and its focus on topic-based communities (subreddits) that can be indicative of someone’s state of mind or interest regarding mental health disorders such as r/SuicideWatch, r/Anxiety, r/depression. A challenge for previous work on suicide risk assessment has been the small amount of labeled data. We propose an empirical investigation into several classes of weakly-supervised approaches, and show that using pseudo-labeling based on related issues around mental health (e.g., anxiety, depression) helps improve model performance for suicide risk assessment.

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Narrative Question Answering with Cutting-Edge Open-Domain QA Techniques: A Comprehensive Study
Xiangyang Mou | Chenghao Yang | Mo Yu | Bingsheng Yao | Xiaoxiao Guo | Saloni Potdar | Hui Su
Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics, Volume 9

Recent advancements in open-domain question answering (ODQA), that is, finding answers from large open-domain corpus like Wikipedia, have led to human-level performance on many datasets. However, progress in QA over book stories (Book QA) lags despite its similar task formulation to ODQA. This work provides a comprehensive and quantitative analysis about the difficulty of Book QA: (1) We benchmark the research on the NarrativeQA dataset with extensive experiments with cutting-edge ODQA techniques. This quantifies the challenges Book QA poses, as well as advances the published state-of-the-art with a ∼7% absolute improvement on ROUGE-L. (2) We further analyze the detailed challenges in Book QA through human studies.1 Our findings indicate that the event-centric questions dominate this task, which exemplifies the inability of existing QA models to handle event-oriented scenarios.

2020

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Frustratingly Hard Evidence Retrieval for QA Over Books
Xiangyang Mou | Mo Yu | Bingsheng Yao | Chenghao Yang | Xiaoxiao Guo | Saloni Potdar | Hui Su
Proceedings of the First Joint Workshop on Narrative Understanding, Storylines, and Events

A lot of progress has been made to improve question answering (QA) in recent years, but the special problem of QA over narrative book stories has not been explored in-depth. We formulate BookQA as an open-domain QA task given its similar dependency on evidence retrieval. We further investigate how state-of-the-art open-domain QA approaches can help BookQA. Besides achieving state-of-the-art on the NarrativeQA benchmark, our study also reveals the difficulty of evidence retrieval in books with a wealth of experiments and analysis - which necessitates future effort on novel solutions for evidence retrieval in BookQA.

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Word-level Textual Adversarial Attacking as Combinatorial Optimization
Yuan Zang | Fanchao Qi | Chenghao Yang | Zhiyuan Liu | Meng Zhang | Qun Liu | Maosong Sun
Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Adversarial attacks are carried out to reveal the vulnerability of deep neural networks. Textual adversarial attacking is challenging because text is discrete and a small perturbation can bring significant change to the original input. Word-level attacking, which can be regarded as a combinatorial optimization problem, is a well-studied class of textual attack methods. However, existing word-level attack models are far from perfect, largely because unsuitable search space reduction methods and inefficient optimization algorithms are employed. In this paper, we propose a novel attack model, which incorporates the sememe-based word substitution method and particle swarm optimization-based search algorithm to solve the two problems separately. We conduct exhaustive experiments to evaluate our attack model by attacking BiLSTM and BERT on three benchmark datasets. Experimental results demonstrate that our model consistently achieves much higher attack success rates and crafts more high-quality adversarial examples as compared to baseline methods. Also, further experiments show our model has higher transferability and can bring more robustness enhancement to victim models by adversarial training. All the code and data of this paper can be obtained on https://github.com/thunlp/SememePSO-Attack.

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Enhancing Transformer with Sememe Knowledge
Yuhui Zhang | Chenghao Yang | Zhengping Zhou | Zhiyuan Liu
Proceedings of the 5th Workshop on Representation Learning for NLP

While large-scale pretraining has achieved great success in many NLP tasks, it has not been fully studied whether external linguistic knowledge can improve data-driven models. In this work, we introduce sememe knowledge into Transformer and propose three sememe-enhanced Transformer models. Sememes, by linguistic definition, are the minimum semantic units of language, which can well represent implicit semantic meanings behind words. Our experiments demonstrate that introducing sememe knowledge into Transformer can consistently improve language modeling and downstream tasks. The adversarial test further demonstrates that sememe knowledge can substantially improve model robustness.

2019

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Modeling Semantic Compositionality with Sememe Knowledge
Fanchao Qi | Junjie Huang | Chenghao Yang | Zhiyuan Liu | Xiao Chen | Qun Liu | Maosong Sun
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Semantic compositionality (SC) refers to the phenomenon that the meaning of a complex linguistic unit can be composed of the meanings of its constituents. Most related works focus on using complicated compositionality functions to model SC while few works consider external knowledge in models. In this paper, we verify the effectiveness of sememes, the minimum semantic units of human languages, in modeling SC by a confirmatory experiment. Furthermore, we make the first attempt to incorporate sememe knowledge into SC models, and employ the sememe-incorporated models in learning representations of multiword expressions, a typical task of SC. In experiments, we implement our models by incorporating knowledge from a famous sememe knowledge base HowNet and perform both intrinsic and extrinsic evaluations. Experimental results show that our models achieve significant performance boost as compared to the baseline methods without considering sememe knowledge. We further conduct quantitative analysis and case studies to demonstrate the effectiveness of applying sememe knowledge in modeling SC.All the code and data of this paper can be obtained on https://github.com/thunlp/Sememe-SC.