Dawn Song


2022

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IELM: An Open Information Extraction Benchmark for Pre-Trained Language Models
Chenguang Wang | Xiao Liu | Dawn Song
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

We introduce a new open information extraction (OIE) benchmark for pre-trained language models (LM). Recent studies have demonstrated that pre-trained LMs, such as BERT and GPT, may store linguistic and relational knowledge. In particular, LMs are able to answer “fill-in-the-blank” questions when given a pre-defined relation category. Instead of focusing on pre-defined relations, we create an OIE benchmark aiming to fully examine the open relational information present in the pre-trained LMs. We accomplish this by turning pre-trained LMs into zero-shot OIE systems. Surprisingly, pre-trained LMs are able to obtain competitive performance on both standard OIE datasets (CaRB and Re-OIE2016) and two new large-scale factual OIE datasets (TAC KBP-OIE and Wikidata-OIE) that we establish via distant supervision. For instance, the zero-shot pre-trained LMs outperform the F1 score of the state-of-the-art supervised OIE methods on our factual OIE datasets without needing to use any training sets.

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Joint Language Semantic and Structure Embedding for Knowledge Graph Completion
Jianhao Shen | Chenguang Wang | Linyuan Gong | Dawn Song
Proceedings of the 29th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

The task of completing knowledge triplets has broad downstream applications. Both structural and semantic information plays an important role in knowledge graph completion. Unlike previous approaches that rely on either the structures or semantics of the knowledge graphs, we propose to jointly embed the semantics in the natural language description of the knowledge triplets with their structure information. Our method embeds knowledge graphs for the completion task via fine-tuning pre-trained language models with respect to a probabilistic structured loss, where the forward pass of the language models captures semantics and the loss reconstructs structures. Our extensive experiments on a variety of knowledge graph benchmarks have demonstrated the state-of-the-art performance of our method. We also show that our method can significantly improve the performance in a low-resource regime, thanks to the better use of semantics. The code and datasets are available at https://github.com/pkusjh/LASS.

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DeepStruct: Pretraining of Language Models for Structure Prediction
Chenguang Wang | Xiao Liu | Zui Chen | Haoyun Hong | Jie Tang | Dawn Song
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL 2022

We introduce a method for improving the structural understanding abilities of language models. Unlike previous approaches that finetune the models with task-specific augmentation, we pretrain language models to generate structures from the text on a collection of task-agnostic corpora. Our structure pretraining enables zero-shot transfer of the learned knowledge that models have about the structure tasks. We study the performance of this approach on 28 datasets, spanning 10 structure prediction tasks including open information extraction, joint entity and relation extraction, named entity recognition, relation classification, semantic role labeling, event extraction, coreference resolution, factual probe, intent detection, and dialogue state tracking. We further enhance the pretraining with the task-specific training sets. We show that a 10B parameter language model transfers non-trivially to most tasks and obtains state-of-the-art performance on 21 of 28 datasets that we evaluate. Our code and datasets will be made publicly available.

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Benchmarking Language Models for Code Syntax Understanding
Da Shen | Xinyun Chen | Chenguang Wang | Koushik Sen | Dawn Song
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2022

Pre-trained language models have demonstrated impressive performance in both natural language processing and program understanding, which represent the input as a token sequence without explicitly modeling its structure. Some prior works show that pre-trained language models can capture the syntactic rules of natural languages without finetuning on syntax understanding tasks. However, there is limited understanding of how well pre-trained models understand the code structure so far. In this work, we perform the first thorough benchmarking of the state-of-the-art pre-trained models for identifying the syntactic structures of programs. Specifically, we introduce CodeSyntax, a large-scale dataset of programs annotated with the syntactic relationships in their corresponding abstract syntax trees. Our key observation is that pre-training on massive code data does not result in decent code syntax understanding. In fact, these pre-trained programming language models fail to match the performance of naive baselines based on positional offsets and keywords. We also present a natural language benchmark to highlight the differences between natural languages and programming languages in terms of understanding corresponding syntactic structures. Our findings point out key limitations of existing pre-training methods and suggest the importance of modeling syntactic structures for the programming language.

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PALT: Parameter-Lite Transfer of Language Models for Knowledge Graph Completion
Jianhao Shen | Chenguang Wang | Ye Yuan | Jiawei Han | Heng Ji | Koushik Sen | Ming Zhang | Dawn Song
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2022

This paper presents a parameter-lite transfer learning approach of pretrained language models (LM) for knowledge graph (KG) completion. Instead of finetuning, which modifies all LM parameters, we only tune a few new parameters while keeping the original LM parameters fixed. We establish this via reformulating KG completion as a “fill-in-the-blank” task, and introducing a parameter-lite encoder on top of the original LMs. We show that, by tuning far fewer parameters than finetuning, LMs transfer non-trivially to most tasks and reach competitiveness with prior state-of-the-art approaches. For instance, we outperform the fully finetuning approaches on a KG completion benchmark by tuning only 1% of the parameters.

2021

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Zero-Shot Information Extraction as a Unified Text-to-Triple Translation
Chenguang Wang | Xiao Liu | Zui Chen | Haoyun Hong | Jie Tang | Dawn Song
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

We cast a suite of information extraction tasks into a text-to-triple translation framework. Instead of solving each task relying on task-specific datasets and models, we formalize the task as a translation between task-specific input text and output triples. By taking the task-specific input, we enable a task-agnostic translation by leveraging the latent knowledge that a pre-trained language model has about the task. We further demonstrate that a simple pre-training task of predicting which relational information corresponds to which input text is an effective way to produce task-specific outputs. This enables the zero-shot transfer of our framework to downstream tasks. We study the zero-shot performance of this framework on open information extraction (OIE2016, NYT, WEB, PENN), relation classification (FewRel and TACRED), and factual probe (Google-RE and T-REx). The model transfers non-trivially to most tasks and is often competitive with a fully supervised method without the need for any task-specific training. For instance, we significantly outperform the F1 score of the supervised open information extraction without needing to use its training set.

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PlotCoder: Hierarchical Decoding for Synthesizing Visualization Code in Programmatic Context
Xinyun Chen | Linyuan Gong | Alvin Cheung | Dawn Song
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Creating effective visualization is an important part of data analytics. While there are many libraries for creating visualization, writing such code remains difficult given the myriad of parameters that users need to provide. In this paper, we propose the new task of synthesizing visualization programs from a combination of natural language utterances and code context. To tackle the learning problem, we introduce PlotCoder, a new hierarchical encoder-decoder architecture that models both the code context and the input utterance. We use PlotCoder to first determine the template of the visualization code, followed by predicting the data to be plotted. We use Jupyter notebooks containing visualization programs crawled from GitHub to train PlotCoder. On a comprehensive set of test samples from those notebooks, we show that PlotCoder correctly predicts the plot type of about 70% samples, and synthesizes the correct programs for 35% samples, performing 3-4.5% better than the baselines.

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Grounded Graph Decoding improves Compositional Generalization in Question Answering
Yu Gai | Paras Jain | Wendi Zhang | Joseph Gonzalez | Dawn Song | Ion Stoica
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2021

Question answering models struggle to generalize to novel compositions of training patterns. Current end-to-end models learn a flat input embedding which can lose input syntax context. Prior approaches improve generalization by learning permutation invariant models, but these methods do not scale to more complex train-test splits. We propose Grounded Graph Decoding, a method to improve compositional generalization of language representations by grounding structured predictions with an attention mechanism. Grounding enables the model to retain syntax information from the input that significantly improves generalization to complex inputs. By predicting a structured graph containing conjunctions of query clauses, we learn a group invariant representation without making assumptions on the target domain. Our model performs competitively on the Compositional Freebase Questions (CFQ) dataset, a challenging benchmark for compositional generalization in question answering. Especially, our model effectively solves the MCD1 split with 98% accuracy. All source is available at https://github.com/gaiyu0/cfq.

2020

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Pretrained Transformers Improve Out-of-Distribution Robustness
Dan Hendrycks | Xiaoyuan Liu | Eric Wallace | Adam Dziedzic | Rishabh Krishnan | Dawn Song
Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Although pretrained Transformers such as BERT achieve high accuracy on in-distribution examples, do they generalize to new distributions? We systematically measure out-of-distribution (OOD) generalization for seven NLP datasets by constructing a new robustness benchmark with realistic distribution shifts. We measure the generalization of previous models including bag-of-words models, ConvNets, and LSTMs, and we show that pretrained Transformers’ performance declines are substantially smaller. Pretrained transformers are also more effective at detecting anomalous or OOD examples, while many previous models are frequently worse than chance. We examine which factors affect robustness, finding that larger models are not necessarily more robust, distillation can be harmful, and more diverse pretraining data can enhance robustness. Finally, we show where future work can improve OOD robustness.

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Imitation Attacks and Defenses for Black-box Machine Translation Systems
Eric Wallace | Mitchell Stern | Dawn Song
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

Adversaries may look to steal or attack black-box NLP systems, either for financial gain or to exploit model errors. One setting of particular interest is machine translation (MT), where models have high commercial value and errors can be costly. We investigate possible exploitations of black-box MT systems and explore a preliminary defense against such threats. We first show that MT systems can be stolen by querying them with monolingual sentences and training models to imitate their outputs. Using simulated experiments, we demonstrate that MT model stealing is possible even when imitation models have different input data or architectures than their target models. Applying these ideas, we train imitation models that reach within 0.6 BLEU of three production MT systems on both high-resource and low-resource language pairs. We then leverage the similarity of our imitation models to transfer adversarial examples to the production systems. We use gradient-based attacks that expose inputs which lead to semantically-incorrect translations, dropped content, and vulgar model outputs. To mitigate these vulnerabilities, we propose a defense that modifies translation outputs in order to misdirect the optimization of imitation models. This defense degrades the adversary’s BLEU score and attack success rate at some cost in the defender’s BLEU and inference speed.