Devansh Gautam


2021

pdf bib
Translate and Classify: Improving Sequence Level Classification for English-Hindi Code-Mixed Data
Devansh Gautam | Kshitij Gupta | Manish Shrivastava
Proceedings of the Fifth Workshop on Computational Approaches to Linguistic Code-Switching

Code-mixing is a common phenomenon in multilingual societies around the world and is especially common in social media texts. Traditional NLP systems, usually trained on monolingual corpora, do not perform well on code-mixed texts. Training specialized models for code-switched texts is difficult due to the lack of large-scale datasets. Translating code-mixed data into standard languages like English could improve performance on various code-mixed tasks since we can use transfer learning from state-of-the-art English models for processing the translated data. This paper focuses on two sequence-level classification tasks for English-Hindi code mixed texts, which are part of the GLUECoS benchmark - Natural Language Inference and Sentiment Analysis. We propose using various pre-trained models that have been fine-tuned for similar English-only tasks and have shown state-of-the-art performance. We further fine-tune these models on the translated code-mixed datasets and achieve state-of-the-art performance in both tasks. To translate English-Hindi code-mixed data to English, we use mBART, a pre-trained multilingual sequence-to-sequence model that has shown competitive performance on various low-resource machine translation pairs and has also shown performance gains in languages that were not in its pre-training corpus.

pdf bib
CoMeT: Towards Code-Mixed Translation Using Parallel Monolingual Sentences
Devansh Gautam | Prashant Kodali | Kshitij Gupta | Anmol Goel | Manish Shrivastava | Ponnurangam Kumaraguru
Proceedings of the Fifth Workshop on Computational Approaches to Linguistic Code-Switching

Code-mixed languages are very popular in multilingual societies around the world, yet the resources lag behind to enable robust systems on such languages. A major contributing factor is the informal nature of these languages which makes it difficult to collect code-mixed data. In this paper, we propose our system for Task 1 of CACLS 2021 to generate a machine translation system for English to Hinglish in a supervised setting. Translating in the given direction can help expand the set of resources for several tasks by translating valuable datasets from high resource languages. We propose to use mBART, a pre-trained multilingual sequence-to-sequence model, and fully utilize the pre-training of the model by transliterating the roman Hindi words in the code-mixed sentences to Devanagri script. We evaluate how expanding the input by concatenating Hindi translations of the English sentences improves mBART’s performance. Our system gives a BLEU score of 12.22 on test set. Further, we perform a detailed error analysis of our proposed systems and explore the limitations of the provided dataset and metrics.

pdf bib
ViTA: Visual-Linguistic Translation by Aligning Object Tags
Kshitij Gupta | Devansh Gautam | Radhika Mamidi
Proceedings of the 8th Workshop on Asian Translation (WAT2021)

Multimodal Machine Translation (MMT) enriches the source text with visual information for translation. It has gained popularity in recent years, and several pipelines have been proposed in the same direction. Yet, the task lacks quality datasets to illustrate the contribution of visual modality in the translation systems. In this paper, we propose our system under the team name Volta for the Multimodal Translation Task of WAT 2021 from English to Hindi. We also participate in the textual-only subtask of the same language pair for which we use mBART, a pretrained multilingual sequence-to-sequence model. For multimodal translation, we propose to enhance the textual input by bringing the visual information to a textual domain by extracting object tags from the image. We also explore the robustness of our system by systematically degrading the source text. Finally, we achieve a BLEU score of 44.6 and 51.6 on the test set and challenge set of the multimodal task.

pdf bib
Volta at SemEval-2021 Task 6: Towards Detecting Persuasive Texts and Images using Textual and Multimodal Ensemble
Kshitij Gupta | Devansh Gautam | Radhika Mamidi
Proceedings of the 15th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation (SemEval-2021)

Memes are one of the most popular types of content used to spread information online. They can influence a large number of people through rhetorical and psychological techniques. The task, Detection of Persuasion Techniques in Texts and Images, is to detect these persuasive techniques in memes. It consists of three subtasks: (A) Multi-label classification using textual content, (B) Multi-label classification and span identification using textual content, and (C) Multi-label classification using visual and textual content. In this paper, we propose a transfer learning approach to fine-tune BERT-based models in different modalities. We also explore the effectiveness of ensembles of models trained in different modalities. We achieve an F1-score of 57.0, 48.2, and 52.1 in the corresponding subtasks.

pdf bib
Volta at SemEval-2021 Task 9: Statement Verification and Evidence Finding with Tables using TAPAS and Transfer Learning
Devansh Gautam | Kshitij Gupta | Manish Shrivastava
Proceedings of the 15th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation (SemEval-2021)

Tables are widely used in various kinds of documents to present information concisely. Understanding tables is a challenging problem that requires an understanding of language and table structure, along with numerical and logical reasoning. In this paper, we present our systems to solve Task 9 of SemEval-2021: Statement Verification and Evidence Finding with Tables (SEM-TAB-FACTS). The task consists of two subtasks: (A) Given a table and a statement, predicting whether the table supports the statement and (B) Predicting which cells in the table provide evidence for/against the statement. We fine-tune TAPAS (a model which extends BERT’s architecture to capture tabular structure) for both the subtasks as it has shown state-of-the-art performance in various table understanding tasks. In subtask A, we evaluate how transfer learning and standardizing tables to have a single header row improves TAPAS’ performance. In subtask B, we evaluate how different fine-tuning strategies can improve TAPAS’ performance. Our systems achieve an F1 score of 67.34 in subtask A three-way classification, 72.89 in subtask A two-way classification, and 62.95 in subtask B.