Han He


2021

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The Stem Cell Hypothesis: Dilemma behind Multi-Task Learning with Transformer Encoders
Han He | Jinho D. Choi
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Multi-task learning with transformer encoders (MTL) has emerged as a powerful technique to improve performance on closely-related tasks for both accuracy and efficiency while a question still remains whether or not it would perform as well on tasks that are distinct in nature. We first present MTL results on five NLP tasks, POS, NER, DEP, CON, and SRL, and depict its deficiency over single-task learning. We then conduct an extensive pruning analysis to show that a certain set of attention heads get claimed by most tasks during MTL, who interfere with one another to fine-tune those heads for their own objectives. Based on this finding, we propose the Stem Cell Hypothesis to reveal the existence of attention heads naturally talented for many tasks that cannot be jointly trained to create adequate embeddings for all of those tasks. Finally, we design novel parameter-free probes to justify our hypothesis and demonstrate how attention heads are transformed across the five tasks during MTL through label analysis.

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Levi Graph AMR Parser using Heterogeneous Attention
Han He | Jinho D. Choi
Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Parsing Technologies and the IWPT 2021 Shared Task on Parsing into Enhanced Universal Dependencies (IWPT 2021)

Coupled with biaffine decoders, transformers have been effectively adapted to text-to-graph transduction and achieved state-of-the-art performance on AMR parsing. Many prior works, however, rely on the biaffine decoder for either or both arc and label predictions although most features used by the decoder may be learned by the transformer already. This paper presents a novel approach to AMR parsing by combining heterogeneous data (tokens, concepts, labels) as one input to a transformer to learn attention, and use only attention matrices from the transformer to predict all elements in AMR graphs (concepts, arcs, labels). Although our models use significantly fewer parameters than the previous state-of-the-art graph parser, they show similar or better accuracy on AMR 2.0 and 3.0.

2020

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Analysis of the Penn Korean Universal Dependency Treebank (PKT-UD): Manual Revision to Build Robust Parsing Model in Korean
Tae Hwan Oh | Ji Yoon Han | Hyonsu Choe | Seokwon Park | Han He | Jinho D. Choi | Na-Rae Han | Jena D. Hwang | Hansaem Kim
Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Parsing Technologies and the IWPT 2020 Shared Task on Parsing into Enhanced Universal Dependencies

In this paper, we first open on important issues regarding the Penn Korean Universal Treebank (PKT-UD) and address these issues by revising the entire corpus manually with the aim of producing cleaner UD annotations that are more faithful to Korean grammar. For compatibility to the rest of UD corpora, we follow the UDv2 guidelines, and extensively revise the part-of-speech tags and the dependency relations to reflect morphological features and flexible word- order aspects in Korean. The original and the revised versions of PKT-UD are experimented with transformer-based parsing models using biaffine attention. The parsing model trained on the revised corpus shows a significant improvement of 3.0% in labeled attachment score over the model trained on the previous corpus. Our error analysis demonstrates that this revision allows the parsing model to learn relations more robustly, reducing several critical errors that used to be made by the previous model.

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Adaptation of Multilingual Transformer Encoder for Robust Enhanced Universal Dependency Parsing
Han He | Jinho D. Choi
Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Parsing Technologies and the IWPT 2020 Shared Task on Parsing into Enhanced Universal Dependencies

This paper presents our enhanced dependency parsing approach using transformer encoders, coupled with a simple yet powerful ensemble algorithm that takes advantage of both tree and graph dependency parsing. Two types of transformer encoders are compared, a multilingual encoder and language-specific encoders. Our dependency tree parsing (DTP) approach generates only primary dependencies to form trees whereas our dependency graph parsing (DGP) approach handles both primary and secondary dependencies to form graphs. Since DGP does not guarantee the generated graphs are acyclic, the ensemble algorithm is designed to add secondary arcs predicted by DGP to primary arcs predicted by DTP. Our results show that models using the multilingual encoder outperform ones using the language specific encoders for most languages. The ensemble models generally show higher labeled attachment score on enhanced dependencies (ELAS) than the DTP and DGP models. As the result, our best models rank the third place on the macro-average ELAS over 17 languages.