Hitomi Yanaka


2022

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Logical Inference for Counting on Semi-structured Tables
Tomoya Kurosawa | Hitomi Yanaka
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Student Research Workshop

Recently, the Natural Language Inference (NLI) task has been studied for semi-structured tables that do not have a strict format. Although neural approaches have achieved high performance in various types of NLI, including NLI between semi-structured tables and texts, they still have difficulty in performing a numerical type of inference, such as counting. To handle a numerical type of inference, we propose a logical inference system for reasoning between semi-structured tables and texts. We use logical representations as meaning representations for tables and texts and use model checking to handle a numerical type of inference between texts and tables. To evaluate the extent to which our system can perform inference with numerical comparatives, we make an evaluation protocol that focuses on numerical understanding between semi-structured tables and texts in English. We show that our system can more robustly perform inference between tables and texts that requires numerical understanding compared with current neural approaches.

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Compositional Semantics and Inference System for Temporal Order based on Japanese CCG
Tomoki Sugimoto | Hitomi Yanaka
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Student Research Workshop

Natural Language Inference (NLI) is the task of determining whether a premise entails a hypothesis. NLI with temporal order is a challenging task because tense and aspect are complex linguistic phenomena involving interactions with temporal adverbs and temporal connectives. To tackle this, temporal and aspectual inference has been analyzed in various ways in the field of formal semantics. However, a Japanese NLI system for temporal order based on the analysis of formal semantics has not been sufficiently developed. We present a logic-based NLI system that considers temporal order in Japanese based on compositional semantics via Combinatory Categorial Grammar (CCG) syntactic analysis. Our system performs inference involving temporal order by using axioms for temporal relations and automated theorem provers. We evaluate our system by experimenting with Japanese NLI datasets that involve temporal order. We show that our system outperforms previous logic-based systems as well as current deep learning-based models.

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Compositional Evaluation on Japanese Textual Entailment and Similarity
Hitomi Yanaka | Koji Mineshima
Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics, Volume 10

Natural Language Inference (NLI) and Semantic Textual Similarity (STS) are widely used benchmark tasks for compositional evaluation of pre-trained language models. Despite growing interest in linguistic universals, most NLI/STS studies have focused almost exclusively on English. In particular, there are no available multilingual NLI/STS datasets in Japanese, which is typologically different from English and can shed light on the currently controversial behavior of language models in matters such as sensitivity to word order and case particles. Against this background, we introduce JSICK, a Japanese NLI/STS dataset that was manually translated from the English dataset SICK. We also present a stress-test dataset for compositional inference, created by transforming syntactic structures of sentences in JSICK to investigate whether language models are sensitive to word order and case particles. We conduct baseline experiments on different pre-trained language models and compare the performance of multilingual models when applied to Japanese and other languages. The results of the stress-test experiments suggest that the current pre-trained language models are insensitive to word order and case marking.

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Annotating Japanese Numeral Expressions for a Logical and Pragmatic Inference Dataset
Kana Koyano | Hitomi Yanaka | Koji Mineshima | Daisuke Bekki
Proceedings of the 18th Joint ACL - ISO Workshop on Interoperable Semantic Annotation within LREC2022

Numeral expressions in Japanese are characterized by the flexibility of quantifier positions and the variety of numeral suffixes. However, little work has been done to build annotated corpora focusing on these features and datasets for testing the understanding of Japanese numeral expressions. In this study, we build a corpus that annotates each numeral expression in an existing phrase structure-based Japanese treebank with its usage and numeral suffix types. We also construct an inference test set for numerical expressions based on this annotated corpus. In this test set, we particularly pay attention to inferences where the correct label differs between logical entailment and implicature and those contexts such as negations and conditionals where the entailment labels can be reversed. The baseline experiment with Japanese BERT models shows that our inference test set poses challenges for inference involving various types of numeral expressions.

2021

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Exploring Transitivity in Neural NLI Models through Veridicality
Hitomi Yanaka | Koji Mineshima | Kentaro Inui
Proceedings of the 16th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Main Volume

Despite the recent success of deep neural networks in natural language processing, the extent to which they can demonstrate human-like generalization capacities for natural language understanding remains unclear. We explore this issue in the domain of natural language inference (NLI), focusing on the transitivity of inference relations, a fundamental property for systematically drawing inferences. A model capturing transitivity can compose basic inference patterns and draw new inferences. We introduce an analysis method using synthetic and naturalistic NLI datasets involving clause-embedding verbs to evaluate whether models can perform transitivity inferences composed of veridical inferences and arbitrary inference types. We find that current NLI models do not perform consistently well on transitivity inference tasks, suggesting that they lack the generalization capacity for drawing composite inferences from provided training examples. The data and code for our analysis are publicly available at https://github.com/verypluming/transitivity.

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Building a Video-and-Language Dataset with Human Actions for Multimodal Logical Inference
Riko Suzuki | Hitomi Yanaka | Koji Mineshima | Daisuke Bekki
Proceedings of the 1st Workshop on Multimodal Semantic Representations (MMSR)

This paper introduces a new video-and-language dataset with human actions for multimodal logical inference, which focuses on intentional and aspectual expressions that describe dynamic human actions. The dataset consists of 200 videos, 5,554 action labels, and 1,942 action triplets of the form (subject, predicate, object) that can be easily translated into logical semantic representations. The dataset is expected to be useful for evaluating multimodal inference systems between videos and semantically complicated sentences including negation and quantification.

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SyGNS: A Systematic Generalization Testbed Based on Natural Language Semantics
Hitomi Yanaka | Koji Mineshima | Kentaro Inui
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL-IJCNLP 2021

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Do Grammatical Error Correction Models Realize Grammatical Generalization?
Masato Mita | Hitomi Yanaka
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL-IJCNLP 2021

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Assessing the Generalization Capacity of Pre-trained Language Models through Japanese Adversarial Natural Language Inference
Hitomi Yanaka | Koji Mineshima
Proceedings of the Fourth BlackboxNLP Workshop on Analyzing and Interpreting Neural Networks for NLP

Despite the success of multilingual pre-trained language models, it remains unclear to what extent these models have human-like generalization capacity across languages. The aim of this study is to investigate the out-of-distribution generalization of pre-trained language models through Natural Language Inference (NLI) in Japanese, the typological properties of which are different from those of English. We introduce a synthetically generated Japanese NLI dataset, called the Japanese Adversarial NLI (JaNLI) dataset, which is inspired by the English HANS dataset and is designed to require understanding of Japanese linguistic phenomena and illuminate the vulnerabilities of models. Through a series of experiments to evaluate the generalization performance of both Japanese and multilingual BERT models, we demonstrate that there is much room to improve current models trained on Japanese NLI tasks. Furthermore, a comparison of human performance and model performance on the different types of garden-path sentences in the JaNLI dataset shows that structural phenomena that ease interpretation of garden-path sentences for human readers do not help models in the same way, highlighting a difference between human readers and the models.

2020

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Do Neural Models Learn Systematicity of Monotonicity Inference in Natural Language?
Hitomi Yanaka | Koji Mineshima | Daisuke Bekki | Kentaro Inui
Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Despite the success of language models using neural networks, it remains unclear to what extent neural models have the generalization ability to perform inferences. In this paper, we introduce a method for evaluating whether neural models can learn systematicity of monotonicity inference in natural language, namely, the regularity for performing arbitrary inferences with generalization on composition. We consider four aspects of monotonicity inferences and test whether the models can systematically interpret lexical and logical phenomena on different training/test splits. A series of experiments show that three neural models systematically draw inferences on unseen combinations of lexical and logical phenomena when the syntactic structures of the sentences are similar between the training and test sets. However, the performance of the models significantly decreases when the structures are slightly changed in the test set while retaining all vocabularies and constituents already appearing in the training set. This indicates that the generalization ability of neural models is limited to cases where the syntactic structures are nearly the same as those in the training set.

2019

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HELP: A Dataset for Identifying Shortcomings of Neural Models in Monotonicity Reasoning
Hitomi Yanaka | Koji Mineshima | Daisuke Bekki | Kentaro Inui | Satoshi Sekine | Lasha Abzianidze | Johan Bos
Proceedings of the Eighth Joint Conference on Lexical and Computational Semantics (*SEM 2019)

Large crowdsourced datasets are widely used for training and evaluating neural models on natural language inference (NLI). Despite these efforts, neural models have a hard time capturing logical inferences, including those licensed by phrase replacements, so-called monotonicity reasoning. Since no large dataset has been developed for monotonicity reasoning, it is still unclear whether the main obstacle is the size of datasets or the model architectures themselves. To investigate this issue, we introduce a new dataset, called HELP, for handling entailments with lexical and logical phenomena. We add it to training data for the state-of-the-art neural models and evaluate them on test sets for monotonicity phenomena. The results showed that our data augmentation improved the overall accuracy. We also find that the improvement is better on monotonicity inferences with lexical replacements than on downward inferences with disjunction and modification. This suggests that some types of inferences can be improved by our data augmentation while others are immune to it.

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Multimodal Logical Inference System for Visual-Textual Entailment
Riko Suzuki | Hitomi Yanaka | Masashi Yoshikawa | Koji Mineshima | Daisuke Bekki
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Student Research Workshop

A large amount of research about multimodal inference across text and vision has been recently developed to obtain visually grounded word and sentence representations. In this paper, we use logic-based representations as unified meaning representations for texts and images and present an unsupervised multimodal logical inference system that can effectively prove entailment relations between them. We show that by combining semantic parsing and theorem proving, the system can handle semantically complex sentences for visual-textual inference.

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Can Neural Networks Understand Monotonicity Reasoning?
Hitomi Yanaka | Koji Mineshima | Daisuke Bekki | Kentaro Inui | Satoshi Sekine | Lasha Abzianidze | Johan Bos
Proceedings of the 2019 ACL Workshop BlackboxNLP: Analyzing and Interpreting Neural Networks for NLP

Monotonicity reasoning is one of the important reasoning skills for any intelligent natural language inference (NLI) model in that it requires the ability to capture the interaction between lexical and syntactic structures. Since no test set has been developed for monotonicity reasoning with wide coverage, it is still unclear whether neural models can perform monotonicity reasoning in a proper way. To investigate this issue, we introduce the Monotonicity Entailment Dataset (MED). Performance by state-of-the-art NLI models on the new test set is substantially worse, under 55%, especially on downward reasoning. In addition, analysis using a monotonicity-driven data augmentation method showed that these models might be limited in their generalization ability in upward and downward reasoning.

2018

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Neural sentence generation from formal semantics
Kana Manome | Masashi Yoshikawa | Hitomi Yanaka | Pascual Martínez-Gómez | Koji Mineshima | Daisuke Bekki
Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Natural Language Generation

Sequence-to-sequence models have shown strong performance in a wide range of NLP tasks, yet their applications to sentence generation from logical representations are underdeveloped. In this paper, we present a sequence-to-sequence model for generating sentences from logical meaning representations based on event semantics. We use a semantic parsing system based on Combinatory Categorial Grammar (CCG) to obtain data annotated with logical formulas. We augment our sequence-to-sequence model with masking for predicates to constrain output sentences. We also propose a novel evaluation method for generation using Recognizing Textual Entailment (RTE). Combining parsing and generation, we test whether or not the output sentence entails the original text and vice versa. Experiments showed that our model outperformed a baseline with respect to both BLEU scores and accuracies in RTE.

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Acquisition of Phrase Correspondences Using Natural Deduction Proofs
Hitomi Yanaka | Koji Mineshima | Pascual Martínez-Gómez | Daisuke Bekki
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 1 (Long Papers)

How to identify, extract, and use phrasal knowledge is a crucial problem for the task of Recognizing Textual Entailment (RTE). To solve this problem, we propose a method for detecting paraphrases via natural deduction proofs of semantic relations between sentence pairs. Our solution relies on a graph reformulation of partial variable unifications and an algorithm that induces subgraph alignments between meaning representations. Experiments show that our method can automatically detect various paraphrases that are absent from existing paraphrase databases. In addition, the detection of paraphrases using proof information improves the accuracy of RTE tasks.

2017

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Determining Semantic Textual Similarity using Natural Deduction Proofs
Hitomi Yanaka | Koji Mineshima | Pascual Martínez-Gómez | Daisuke Bekki
Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Determining semantic textual similarity is a core research subject in natural language processing. Since vector-based models for sentence representation often use shallow information, capturing accurate semantics is difficult. By contrast, logical semantic representations capture deeper levels of sentence semantics, but their symbolic nature does not offer graded notions of textual similarity. We propose a method for determining semantic textual similarity by combining shallow features with features extracted from natural deduction proofs of bidirectional entailment relations between sentence pairs. For the natural deduction proofs, we use ccg2lambda, a higher-order automatic inference system, which converts Combinatory Categorial Grammar (CCG) derivation trees into semantic representations and conducts natural deduction proofs. Experiments show that our system was able to outperform other logic-based systems and that features derived from the proofs are effective for learning textual similarity.