Jaewook Kang


2022

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Enhancing Out-of-Distribution Detection in Natural Language Understanding via Implicit Layer Ensemble
Hyunsoo Cho | Choonghyun Park | Jaewook Kang | Kang Min Yoo | Taeuk Kim | Sang-goo Lee
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2022

Out-of-distribution (OOD) detection aims to discern outliers from the intended data distribution, which is crucial to maintaining high reliability and a good user experience.Most recent studies in OOD detection utilize the information from a single representation that resides in the penultimate layer to determine whether the input is anomalous or not.Although such a method is straightforward, the potential of diverse information in the intermediate layers is overlooked.In this paper, we propose a novel framework based on contrastive learning that encourages intermediate features to learn layer-specialized representations and assembles them implicitly into a single representation to absorb rich information in the pre-trained language model. Extensive experiments in various intent classification and OOD datasets demonstrate that our approach is significantly more effective than other works.

2021

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What Changes Can Large-scale Language Models Bring? Intensive Study on HyperCLOVA: Billions-scale Korean Generative Pretrained Transformers
Boseop Kim | HyoungSeok Kim | Sang-Woo Lee | Gichang Lee | Donghyun Kwak | Jeon Dong Hyeon | Sunghyun Park | Sungju Kim | Seonhoon Kim | Dongpil Seo | Heungsub Lee | Minyoung Jeong | Sungjae Lee | Minsub Kim | Suk Hyun Ko | Seokhun Kim | Taeyong Park | Jinuk Kim | Soyoung Kang | Na-Hyeon Ryu | Kang Min Yoo | Minsuk Chang | Soobin Suh | Sookyo In | Jinseong Park | Kyungduk Kim | Hiun Kim | Jisu Jeong | Yong Goo Yeo | Donghoon Ham | Dongju Park | Min Young Lee | Jaewook Kang | Inho Kang | Jung-Woo Ha | Woomyoung Park | Nako Sung
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

GPT-3 shows remarkable in-context learning ability of large-scale language models (LMs) trained on hundreds of billion scale data. Here we address some remaining issues less reported by the GPT-3 paper, such as a non-English LM, the performances of different sized models, and the effect of recently introduced prompt optimization on in-context learning. To achieve this, we introduce HyperCLOVA, a Korean variant of 82B GPT-3 trained on a Korean-centric corpus of 560B tokens. Enhanced by our Korean-specific tokenization, HyperCLOVA with our training configuration shows state-of-the-art in-context zero-shot and few-shot learning performances on various downstream tasks in Korean. Also, we show the performance benefits of prompt-based learning and demonstrate how it can be integrated into the prompt engineering pipeline. Then we discuss the possibility of materializing the No Code AI paradigm by providing AI prototyping capabilities to non-experts of ML by introducing HyperCLOVA studio, an interactive prompt engineering interface. Lastly, we demonstrate the potential of our methods with three successful in-house applications.

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GPT3Mix: Leveraging Large-scale Language Models for Text Augmentation
Kang Min Yoo | Dongju Park | Jaewook Kang | Sang-Woo Lee | Woomyoung Park
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2021

Large-scale language models such as GPT-3 are excellent few-shot learners, allowing them to be controlled via natural text prompts. Recent studies report that prompt-based direct classification eliminates the need for fine-tuning but lacks data and inference scalability. This paper proposes a novel data augmentation technique that leverages large-scale language models to generate realistic text samples from a mixture of real samples. We also propose utilizing soft-labels predicted by the language models, effectively distilling knowledge from the large-scale language models and creating textual perturbations simultaneously. We perform data augmentation experiments on diverse classification tasks and show that our method hugely outperforms existing text augmentation methods. We also conduct experiments on our newly proposed benchmark to show that the augmentation effect is not only attributed to memorization. Further ablation studies and a qualitative analysis provide more insights into our approach.