Jay-Yoon Lee

Also published as: Jay Yoon Lee


2022

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Event-Event Relation Extraction using Probabilistic Box Embedding
EunJeong Hwang | Jay-Yoon Lee | Tianyi Yang | Dhruvesh Patel | Dongxu Zhang | Andrew McCallum
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 2: Short Papers)

To understand a story with multiple events, it is important to capture the proper relations across these events. However, existing event relation extraction (ERE) framework regards it as a multi-class classification task and do not guarantee any coherence between different relation types, such as anti-symmetry. If a phone line “died” after “storm”, then it is obvious that the “storm” happened before the “died”. Current framework of event relation extraction do not guarantee this coherence and thus enforces it via constraint loss function (Wang et al., 2020). In this work, we propose to modify the underlying ERE model to guarantee coherence by representing each event as a box representation (BERE) without applying explicit constraints. From our experiments, BERE also shows stronger conjunctive constraint satisfaction while performing on par or better in F1 compared to previous models with constraint injection.

2021

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StructSum: Summarization via Structured Representations
Vidhisha Balachandran | Artidoro Pagnoni | Jay Yoon Lee | Dheeraj Rajagopal | Jaime Carbonell | Yulia Tsvetkov
Proceedings of the 16th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Main Volume

Abstractive text summarization aims at compressing the information of a long source document into a rephrased, condensed summary. Despite advances in modeling techniques, abstractive summarization models still suffer from several key challenges: (i) layout bias: they overfit to the style of training corpora; (ii) limited abstractiveness: they are optimized to copying n-grams from the source rather than generating novel abstractive summaries; (iii) lack of transparency: they are not interpretable. In this work, we propose a framework based on document-level structure induction for summarization to address these challenges. To this end, we propose incorporating latent and explicit dependencies across sentences in the source document into end-to-end single-document summarization models. Our framework complements standard encoder-decoder summarization models by augmenting them with rich structure-aware document representations based on implicitly learned (latent) structures and externally-derived linguistic (explicit) structures. We show that our summarization framework, trained on the CNN/DM dataset, improves the coverage of content in the source documents, generates more abstractive summaries by generating more novel n-grams, and incorporates interpretable sentence-level structures, while performing on par with standard baselines.

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Improved Latent Tree Induction with Distant Supervision via Span Constraints
Zhiyang Xu | Andrew Drozdov | Jay Yoon Lee | Tim O’Gorman | Subendhu Rongali | Dylan Finkbeiner | Shilpa Suresh | Mohit Iyyer | Andrew McCallum
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

For over thirty years, researchers have developed and analyzed methods for latent tree induction as an approach for unsupervised syntactic parsing. Nonetheless, modern systems still do not perform well enough compared to their supervised counterparts to have any practical use as structural annotation of text. In this work, we present a technique that uses distant supervision in the form of span constraints (i.e. phrase bracketing) to improve performance in unsupervised constituency parsing. Using a relatively small number of span constraints we can substantially improve the output from DIORA, an already competitive unsupervised parsing system. Compared with full parse tree annotation, span constraints can be acquired with minimal effort, such as with a lexicon derived from Wikipedia, to find exact text matches. Our experiments show span constraints based on entities improves constituency parsing on English WSJ Penn Treebank by more than 5 F1. Furthermore, our method extends to any domain where span constraints are easily attainable, and as a case study we demonstrate its effectiveness by parsing biomedical text from the CRAFT dataset.

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Case-based Reasoning for Natural Language Queries over Knowledge Bases
Rajarshi Das | Manzil Zaheer | Dung Thai | Ameya Godbole | Ethan Perez | Jay Yoon Lee | Lizhen Tan | Lazaros Polymenakos | Andrew McCallum
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

It is often challenging to solve a complex problem from scratch, but much easier if we can access other similar problems with their solutions — a paradigm known as case-based reasoning (CBR). We propose a neuro-symbolic CBR approach (CBR-KBQA) for question answering over large knowledge bases. CBR-KBQA consists of a nonparametric memory that stores cases (question and logical forms) and a parametric model that can generate a logical form for a new question by retrieving cases that are relevant to it. On several KBQA datasets that contain complex questions, CBR-KBQA achieves competitive performance. For example, on the CWQ dataset, CBR-KBQA outperforms the current state of the art by 11% on accuracy. Furthermore, we show that CBR-KBQA is capable of using new cases without any further training: by incorporating a few human-labeled examples in the case memory, CBR-KBQA is able to successfully generate logical forms containing unseen KB entities as well as relations.

2018

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Towards Semi-Supervised Learning for Deep Semantic Role Labeling
Sanket Vaibhav Mehta | Jay Yoon Lee | Jaime Carbonell
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Neural models have shown several state-of-the-art performances on Semantic Role Labeling (SRL). However, the neural models require an immense amount of semantic-role corpora and are thus not well suited for low-resource languages or domains. The paper proposes a semi-supervised semantic role labeling method that outperforms the state-of-the-art in limited SRL training corpora. The method is based on explicitly enforcing syntactic constraints by augmenting the training objective with a syntactic-inconsistency loss component and uses SRL-unlabeled instances to train a joint-objective LSTM. On CoNLL-2012 English section, the proposed semi-supervised training with 1%, 10% SRL-labeled data and varying amounts of SRL-unlabeled data achieves +1.58, +0.78 F1, respectively, over the pre-trained models that were trained on SOTA architecture with ELMo on the same SRL-labeled data. Additionally, by using the syntactic-inconsistency loss on inference time, the proposed model achieves +3.67, +2.1 F1 over pre-trained model on 1%, 10% SRL-labeled data, respectively.