Jenny Chim


2022

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Identifying Moments of Change from Longitudinal User Text
Adam Tsakalidis | Federico Nanni | Anthony Hills | Jenny Chim | Jiayu Song | Maria Liakata
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Identifying changes in individuals’ behaviour and mood, as observed via content shared on online platforms, is increasingly gaining importance. Most research to-date on this topic focuses on either: (a) identifying individuals at risk or with a certain mental health condition given a batch of posts or (b) providing equivalent labels at the post level. A disadvantage of such work is the lack of a strong temporal component and the inability to make longitudinal assessments following an individual’s trajectory and allowing timely interventions. Here we define a new task, that of identifying moments of change in individuals on the basis of their shared content online. The changes we consider are sudden shifts in mood (switches) or gradual mood progression (escalations). We have created detailed guidelines for capturing moments of change and a corpus of 500 manually annotated user timelines (18.7K posts). We have developed a variety of baseline models drawing inspiration from related tasks and show that the best performance is obtained through context aware sequential modelling. We also introduce new metrics for capturing rare events in temporal windows.

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Overview of the CLPsych 2022 Shared Task: Capturing Moments of Change in Longitudinal User Posts
Adam Tsakalidis | Jenny Chim | Iman Munire Bilal | Ayah Zirikly | Dana Atzil-Slonim | Federico Nanni | Philip Resnik | Manas Gaur | Kaushik Roy | Becky Inkster | Jeff Leintz | Maria Liakata
Proceedings of the Eighth Workshop on Computational Linguistics and Clinical Psychology

We provide an overview of the CLPsych 2022 Shared Task, which focusses on the automatic identification of ‘Moments of Change’ in lon- gitudinal posts by individuals on social media and its connection with information regarding mental health . This year’s task introduced the notion of longitudinal modelling of the text generated by an individual online over time, along with appropriate temporally sen- sitive evaluation metrics. The Shared Task con- sisted of two subtasks: (a) the main task of cap- turing changes in an individual’s mood (dras- tic changes-‘Switches’- and gradual changes -‘Escalations’- on the basis of textual content shared online; and subsequently (b) the sub- task of identifying the suicide risk level of an individual – a continuation of the CLPsych 2019 Shared Task– where participants were encouraged to explore how the identification of changes in mood in task (a) can help with assessing suicidality risk in task (b).