Jiho Jin


2022

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Two-Step Question Retrieval for Open-Domain QA
Yeon Seonwoo | Juhee Son | Jiho Jin | Sang-Woo Lee | Ji-Hoon Kim | Jung-Woo Ha | Alice Oh
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL 2022

The retriever-reader pipeline has shown promising performance in open-domain QA but suffers from a very slow inference speed. Recently proposed question retrieval models tackle this problem by indexing question-answer pairs and searching for similar questions. These models have shown a significant increase in inference speed, but at the cost of lower QA performance compared to the retriever-reader models. This paper proposes a two-step question retrieval model, SQuID (Sequential Question-Indexed Dense retrieval) and distant supervision for training. SQuID uses two bi-encoders for question retrieval. The first-step retriever selects top-k similar questions, and the second-step retriever finds the most similar question from the top-k questions. We evaluate the performance and the computational efficiency of SQuID. The results show that SQuID significantly increases the performance of existing question retrieval models with a negligible loss on inference speed.

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HUE: Pretrained Model and Dataset for Understanding Hanja Documents of Ancient Korea
Haneul Yoo | Jiho Jin | Juhee Son | JinYeong Bak | Kyunghyun Cho | Alice Oh
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: NAACL 2022

Historical records in Korea before the 20th century were primarily written in Hanja, an extinct language based on Chinese characters and not understood by modern Korean or Chinese speakers. Historians with expertise in this time period have been analyzing the documents, but that process is very difficult and time-consuming, and language models would significantly speed up the process. Toward building and evaluating language models for Hanja, we release the Hanja Understanding Evaluation dataset consisting of chronological attribution, topic classification, named entity recognition, and summary retrieval tasks. We also present BERT-based models continued training on the two major corpora from the 14th to the 19th centuries: the Annals of the Joseon Dynasty and Diaries of the Royal Secretariats. We compare the models with several baselines on all tasks and show there are significant improvements gained by training on the two corpora. Additionally, we run zero-shot experiments on the Daily Records of the Royal Court and Important Officials (DRRI). The DRRI dataset has not been studied much by the historians, and not at all by the NLP community.