Joris Pelemans


2017

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Character-Word LSTM Language Models
Lyan Verwimp | Joris Pelemans | Hugo Van hamme | Patrick Wambacq
Proceedings of the 15th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Volume 1, Long Papers

We present a Character-Word Long Short-Term Memory Language Model which both reduces the perplexity with respect to a baseline word-level language model and reduces the number of parameters of the model. Character information can reveal structural (dis)similarities between words and can even be used when a word is out-of-vocabulary, thus improving the modeling of infrequent and unknown words. By concatenating word and character embeddings, we achieve up to 2.77% relative improvement on English compared to a baseline model with a similar amount of parameters and 4.57% on Dutch. Moreover, we also outperform baseline word-level models with a larger number of parameters.

2016

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Sparse Non-negative Matrix Language Modeling
Joris Pelemans | Noam Shazeer | Ciprian Chelba
Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics, Volume 4

We present Sparse Non-negative Matrix (SNM) estimation, a novel probability estimation technique for language modeling that can efficiently incorporate arbitrary features. We evaluate SNM language models on two corpora: the One Billion Word Benchmark and a subset of the LDC English Gigaword corpus. Results show that SNM language models trained with n-gram features are a close match for the well-established Kneser-Ney models. The addition of skip-gram features yields a model that is in the same league as the state-of-the-art recurrent neural network language models, as well as complementary: combining the two modeling techniques yields the best known result on the One Billion Word Benchmark. On the Gigaword corpus further improvements are observed using features that cross sentence boundaries. The computational advantages of SNM estimation over both maximum entropy and neural network estimation are probably its main strength, promising an approach that has large flexibility in combining arbitrary features and yet scales gracefully to large amounts of data.

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SCALE: A Scalable Language Engineering Toolkit
Joris Pelemans | Lyan Verwimp | Kris Demuynck | Hugo Van hamme | Patrick Wambacq
Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'16)

In this paper we present SCALE, a new Python toolkit that contains two extensions to n-gram language models. The first extension is a novel technique to model compound words called Semantic Head Mapping (SHM). The second extension, Bag-of-Words Language Modeling (BagLM), bundles popular models such as Latent Semantic Analysis and Continuous Skip-grams. Both extensions scale to large data and allow the integration into first-pass ASR decoding. The toolkit is open source, includes working examples and can be found on http://github.com/jorispelemans/scale.

2015

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Smart Computer Aided Translation Environment
Vincent Vandeghinste | Tom Vanallemeersch | Frank Van Eynde | Geert Heyman | Sien Moens | Joris Pelemans | Patrick Wambacq | Iulianna Van der Lek - Ciudin | Arda Tezcan | Lieve Macken | Véronique Hoste | Eva Geurts | Mieke Haesen
Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference of the European Association for Machine Translation

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Smart Computer Aided Translation Environment - SCATE
Vincent Vandeghinste | Tom Vanallemeersch | Frank Van Eynde | Geert Heyman | Sien Moens | Joris Pelemans | Patrick Wambacq | Iulianna Van der Lek - Ciudin | Arda Tezcan | Lieve Macken | Véronique Hoste | Eva Geurts | Mieke Haesen
Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference of the European Association for Machine Translation

2014

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Speech Recognition Web Services for Dutch
Joris Pelemans | Kris Demuynck | Hugo Van hamme | Patrick Wambacq
Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'14)

In this paper we present 3 applications in the domain of Automatic Speech Recognition for Dutch, all of which are developed using our in-house speech recognition toolkit SPRAAK. The speech-to-text transcriber is a large vocabulary continuous speech recognizer, optimized for Southern Dutch. It is capable to select components and adjust parameters on the fly, based on the observed conditions in the audio and was recently extended with the capability of adding new words to the lexicon. The grapheme-to-phoneme converter generates possible pronunciations for Dutch words, based on lexicon lookup and linguistic rules. The speech-text alignment system takes audio and text as input and constructs a time aligned output where every word receives exact begin and end times. All three of the applications (and others) are freely available, after registration, as a web application on http://www.spraak.org/webservice/ and in addition, can be accessed as a web service in automated tools.