Joshua Maynez


2022

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A Well-Composed Text is Half Done! Composition Sampling for Diverse Conditional Generation
Shashi Narayan | Gonçalo Simões | Yao Zhao | Joshua Maynez | Dipanjan Das | Michael Collins | Mirella Lapata
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

We propose Composition Sampling, a simple but effective method to generate diverse outputs for conditional generation of higher quality compared to previous stochastic decoding strategies. It builds on recently proposed plan-based neural generation models (FROST, Narayan et al, 2021) that are trained to first create a composition of the output and then generate by conditioning on it and the input. Our approach avoids text degeneration by first sampling a composition in the form of an entity chain and then using beam search to generate the best possible text grounded to this entity chain. Experiments on summarization (CNN/DailyMail and XSum) and question generation (SQuAD), using existing and newly proposed automaticmetrics together with human-based evaluation, demonstrate that Composition Sampling is currently the best available decoding strategy for generating diverse meaningful outputs.

2021

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A Thorough Evaluation of Task-Specific Pretraining for Summarization
Sascha Rothe | Joshua Maynez | Shashi Narayan
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Task-agnostic pretraining objectives like masked language models or corrupted span prediction are applicable to a wide range of NLP downstream tasks (Raffel et al.,2019), but are outperformed by task-specific pretraining objectives like predicting extracted gap sentences on summarization (Zhang et al.,2020). We compare three summarization specific pretraining objectives with the task agnostic corrupted span prediction pretraining in controlled study. We also extend our study to a low resource and zero shot setup, to understand how many training examples are needed in order to ablate the task-specific pretraining without quality loss. Our results show that task-agnostic pretraining is sufficient for most cases which hopefully reduces the need for costly task-specific pretraining. We also report new state-of-the-art number for two summarization task using a T5 model with 11 billion parameters and an optimal beam search length penalty.

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Planning with Learned Entity Prompts for Abstractive Summarization
Shashi Narayan | Yao Zhao | Joshua Maynez | Gonçalo Simões | Vitaly Nikolaev | Ryan McDonald
Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics, Volume 9

Abstract We introduce a simple but flexible mechanism to learn an intermediate plan to ground the generation of abstractive summaries. Specifically, we prepend (or prompt) target summaries with entity chains—ordered sequences of entities mentioned in the summary. Transformer-based sequence-to-sequence models are then trained to generate the entity chain and then continue generating the summary conditioned on the entity chain and the input. We experimented with both pretraining and finetuning with this content planning objective. When evaluated on CNN/DailyMail, XSum, SAMSum, and BillSum, we demonstrate empirically that the grounded generation with the planning objective improves entity specificity and planning in summaries for all datasets, and achieves state-of-the-art performance on XSum and SAMSum in terms of rouge. Moreover, we demonstrate empirically that planning with entity chains provides a mechanism to control hallucinations in abstractive summaries. By prompting the decoder with a modified content plan that drops hallucinated entities, we outperform state-of-the-art approaches for faithfulness when evaluated automatically and by humans.

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Focus Attention: Promoting Faithfulness and Diversity in Summarization
Rahul Aralikatte | Shashi Narayan | Joshua Maynez | Sascha Rothe | Ryan McDonald
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Professional summaries are written with document-level information, such as the theme of the document, in mind. This is in contrast with most seq2seq decoders which simultaneously learn to focus on salient content, while deciding what to generate, at each decoding step. With the motivation to narrow this gap, we introduce Focus Attention Mechanism, a simple yet effective method to encourage decoders to proactively generate tokens that are similar or topical to the input document. Further, we propose a Focus Sampling method to enable generation of diverse summaries, an area currently understudied in summarization. When evaluated on the BBC extreme summarization task, two state-of-the-art models augmented with Focus Attention generate summaries that are closer to the target and more faithful to their input documents, outperforming their vanilla counterparts on ROUGE and multiple faithfulness measures. We also empirically demonstrate that Focus Sampling is more effective in generating diverse and faithful summaries than top-k or nucleus sampling-based decoding methods.

2020

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On Faithfulness and Factuality in Abstractive Summarization
Joshua Maynez | Shashi Narayan | Bernd Bohnet | Ryan McDonald
Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

It is well known that the standard likelihood training and approximate decoding objectives in neural text generation models lead to less human-like responses for open-ended tasks such as language modeling and story generation. In this paper we have analyzed limitations of these models for abstractive document summarization and found that these models are highly prone to hallucinate content that is unfaithful to the input document. We conducted a large scale human evaluation of several neural abstractive summarization systems to better understand the types of hallucinations they produce. Our human annotators found substantial amounts of hallucinated content in all model generated summaries. However, our analysis does show that pretrained models are better summarizers not only in terms of raw metrics, i.e., ROUGE, but also in generating faithful and factual summaries as evaluated by humans. Furthermore, we show that textual entailment measures better correlate with faithfulness than standard metrics, potentially leading the way to automatic evaluation metrics as well as training and decoding criteria.

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Stepwise Extractive Summarization and Planning with Structured Transformers
Shashi Narayan | Joshua Maynez | Jakub Adamek | Daniele Pighin | Blaz Bratanic | Ryan McDonald
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

We propose encoder-centric stepwise models for extractive summarization using structured transformers – HiBERT and Extended Transformers. We enable stepwise summarization by injecting the previously generated summary into the structured transformer as an auxiliary sub-structure. Our models are not only efficient in modeling the structure of long inputs, but they also do not rely on task-specific redundancy-aware modeling, making them a general purpose extractive content planner for different tasks. When evaluated on CNN/DailyMail extractive summarization, stepwise models achieve state-of-the-art performance in terms of Rouge without any redundancy aware modeling or sentence filtering. This also holds true for Rotowire table-to-text generation, where our models surpass previously reported metrics for content selection, planning and ordering, highlighting the strength of stepwise modeling. Amongst the two structured transformers we test, stepwise Extended Transformers provides the best performance across both datasets and sets a new standard for these challenges.

2018

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Morphosyntactic Tagging with a Meta-BiLSTM Model over Context Sensitive Token Encodings
Bernd Bohnet | Ryan McDonald | Gonçalo Simões | Daniel Andor | Emily Pitler | Joshua Maynez
Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

The rise of neural networks, and particularly recurrent neural networks, has produced significant advances in part-of-speech tagging accuracy. One characteristic common among these models is the presence of rich initial word encodings. These encodings typically are composed of a recurrent character-based representation with dynamically and pre-trained word embeddings. However, these encodings do not consider a context wider than a single word and it is only through subsequent recurrent layers that word or sub-word information interacts. In this paper, we investigate models that use recurrent neural networks with sentence-level context for initial character and word-based representations. In particular we show that optimal results are obtained by integrating these context sensitive representations through synchronized training with a meta-model that learns to combine their states.