Jungsoo Park


2022

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Consistency Training with Virtual Adversarial Discrete Perturbation
Jungsoo Park | Gyuwan Kim | Jaewoo Kang
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Consistency training regularizes a model by enforcing predictions of original and perturbed inputs to be similar. Previous studies have proposed various augmentation methods for the perturbation but are limited in that they are agnostic to the training model. Thus, the perturbed samples may not aid in regularization due to their ease of classification from the model. In this context, we propose an augmentation method of adding a discrete noise that would incur the highest divergence between predictions. This virtual adversarial discrete noise obtained by replacing a small portion of tokens while keeping original semantics as much as possible efficiently pushes a training model’s decision boundary. Experimental results show that our proposed method outperforms other consistency training baselines with text editing, paraphrasing, or a continuous noise on semi-supervised text classification tasks and a robustness benchmark.

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FaVIQ: FAct Verification from Information-seeking Questions
Jungsoo Park | Sewon Min | Jaewoo Kang | Luke Zettlemoyer | Hannaneh Hajishirzi
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Despite significant interest in developing general purpose fact checking models, it is challenging to construct a large-scale fact verification dataset with realistic real-world claims. Existing claims are either authored by crowdworkers, thereby introducing subtle biases thatare difficult to control for, or manually verified by professional fact checkers, causing them to be expensive and limited in scale. In this paper, we construct a large-scale challenging fact verification dataset called FAVIQ, consisting of 188k claims derived from an existing corpus of ambiguous information-seeking questions. The ambiguities in the questions enable automatically constructing true and false claims that reflect user confusions (e.g., the year of the movie being filmed vs. being released). Claims in FAVIQ are verified to be natural, contain little lexical bias, and require a complete understanding of the evidence for verification. Our experiments show that the state-of-the-art models are far from solving our new task. Moreover, training on our data helps in professional fact-checking, outperforming models trained on the widely used dataset FEVER or in-domain data by up to 17% absolute. Altogether, our data will serve as a challenging benchmark for natural language understanding and support future progress in professional fact checking.

2021

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Learn to Resolve Conversational Dependency: A Consistency Training Framework for Conversational Question Answering
Gangwoo Kim | Hyunjae Kim | Jungsoo Park | Jaewoo Kang
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

One of the main challenges in conversational question answering (CQA) is to resolve the conversational dependency, such as anaphora and ellipsis. However, existing approaches do not explicitly train QA models on how to resolve the dependency, and thus these models are limited in understanding human dialogues. In this paper, we propose a novel framework, ExCorD (Explicit guidance on how to resolve Conversational Dependency) to enhance the abilities of QA models in comprehending conversational context. ExCorD first generates self-contained questions that can be understood without the conversation history, then trains a QA model with the pairs of original and self-contained questions using a consistency-based regularizer. In our experiments, we demonstrate that ExCorD significantly improves the QA models’ performance by up to 1.2 F1 on QuAC, and 5.2 F1 on CANARD, while addressing the limitations of the existing approaches.

2020

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Adversarial Subword Regularization for Robust Neural Machine Translation
Jungsoo Park | Mujeen Sung | Jinhyuk Lee | Jaewoo Kang
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2020

Exposing diverse subword segmentations to neural machine translation (NMT) models often improves the robustness of machine translation as NMT models can experience various subword candidates. However, the diversification of subword segmentations mostly relies on the pre-trained subword language models from which erroneous segmentations of unseen words are less likely to be sampled. In this paper, we present adversarial subword regularization (ADVSR) to study whether gradient signals during training can be a substitute criterion for exposing diverse subword segmentations. We experimentally show that our model-based adversarial samples effectively encourage NMT models to be less sensitive to segmentation errors and improve the performance of NMT models in low-resource and out-domain datasets.