Kushal Chawla


2022

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Opponent Modeling in Negotiation Dialogues by Related Data Adaptation
Kushal Chawla | Gale Lucas | Jonathan May | Jonathan Gratch
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: NAACL 2022

Opponent modeling is the task of inferring another party’s mental state within the context of social interactions. In a multi-issue negotiation, it involves inferring the relative importance that the opponent assigns to each issue under discussion, which is crucial for finding high-value deals. A practical model for this task needs to infer these priorities of the opponent on the fly based on partial dialogues as input, without needing additional annotations for training. In this work, we propose a ranker for identifying these priorities from negotiation dialogues. The model takes in a partial dialogue as input and predicts the priority order of the opponent. We further devise ways to adapt related data sources for this task to provide more explicit supervision for incorporating the opponent’s preferences and offers, as a proxy to relying on granular utterance-level annotations. We show the utility of our proposed approach through extensive experiments based on two dialogue datasets. We find that the proposed data adaptations lead to strong performance in zero-shot and few-shot scenarios. Moreover, they allow the model to perform better than baselines while accessing fewer utterances from the opponent. We release our code to support future work in this direction.

2021

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CaSiNo: A Corpus of Campsite Negotiation Dialogues for Automatic Negotiation Systems
Kushal Chawla | Jaysa Ramirez | Rene Clever | Gale Lucas | Jonathan May | Jonathan Gratch
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Automated systems that negotiate with humans have broad applications in pedagogy and conversational AI. To advance the development of practical negotiation systems, we present CaSiNo: a novel corpus of over a thousand negotiation dialogues in English. Participants take the role of campsite neighbors and negotiate for food, water, and firewood packages for their upcoming trip. Our design results in diverse and linguistically rich negotiations while maintaining a tractable, closed-domain environment. Inspired by the literature in human-human negotiations, we annotate persuasion strategies and perform correlation analysis to understand how the dialogue behaviors are associated with the negotiation performance. We further propose and evaluate a multi-task framework to recognize these strategies in a given utterance. We find that multi-task learning substantially improves the performance for all strategy labels, especially for the ones that are the most skewed. We release the dataset, annotations, and the code to propel future work in human-machine negotiations: https://github.com/kushalchawla/CaSiNo

2020

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LynyrdSkynyrd at WNUT-2020 Task 2: Semi-Supervised Learning for Identification of Informative COVID-19 English Tweets
Abhilasha Sancheti | Kushal Chawla | Gaurav Verma
Proceedings of the Sixth Workshop on Noisy User-generated Text (W-NUT 2020)

In this work, we describe our system for WNUT-2020 shared task on the identification of informative COVID-19 English tweets. Our system is an ensemble of various machine learning methods, leveraging both traditional feature-based classifiers as well as recent advances in pre-trained language models that help in capturing the syntactic, semantic, and contextual features from the tweets. We further employ pseudo-labelling to incorporate the unlabelled Twitter data released on the pandemic. Our best performing model achieves an F1-score of 0.9179 on the provided validation set and 0.8805 on the blind test-set.

2019

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Generating Formality-Tuned Summaries Using Input-Dependent Rewards
Kushal Chawla | Balaji Vasan Srinivasan | Niyati Chhaya
Proceedings of the 23rd Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning (CoNLL)

Abstractive text summarization aims at generating human-like summaries by understanding and paraphrasing the given input content. Recent efforts based on sequence-to-sequence networks only allow the generation of a single summary. However, it is often desirable to accommodate the psycho-linguistic preferences of the intended audience while generating the summaries. In this work, we present a reinforcement learning based approach to generate formality-tailored summaries for an input article. Our novel input-dependent reward function aids in training the model with stylistic feedback on sampled and ground-truth summaries together. Once trained, the same model can generate formal and informal summary variants. Our automated and qualitative evaluations show the viability of the proposed framework.

2018

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Aff2Vec: Affect–Enriched Distributional Word Representations
Sopan Khosla | Niyati Chhaya | Kushal Chawla
Proceedings of the 27th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

Human communication includes information, opinions and reactions. Reactions are often captured by the affective-messages in written as well as verbal communications. While there has been work in affect modeling and to some extent affective content generation, the area of affective word distributions is not well studied. Synsets and lexica capture semantic relationships across words. These models, however, lack in encoding affective or emotional word interpretations. Our proposed model, Aff2Vec, provides a method for enriched word embeddings that are representative of affective interpretations of words. Aff2Vec outperforms the state-of-the-art in intrinsic word-similarity tasks. Further, the use of Aff2Vec representations outperforms baseline embeddings in downstream natural language understanding tasks including sentiment analysis, personality detection, and frustration prediction.

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Frustrated, Polite, or Formal: Quantifying Feelings and Tone in Email
Niyati Chhaya | Kushal Chawla | Tanya Goyal | Projjal Chanda | Jaya Singh
Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Computational Modeling of People’s Opinions, Personality, and Emotions in Social Media

Email conversations are the primary mode of communication in enterprises. The email content expresses an individual’s needs, requirements and intentions. Affective information in the email text can be used to get an insight into the sender’s mood or emotion. We present a novel approach to model human frustration in text. We identify linguistic features that influence human perception of frustration and model it as a supervised learning task. The paper provides a detailed comparison across traditional regression and word distribution-based models. We report a mean-squared error (MSE) of 0.018 against human-annotated frustration for the best performing model. The approach establishes the importance of affect features in frustration prediction for email data. We further evaluate the efficacy of the proposed feature set and model in predicting other tone or affects in text, namely formality and politeness; results demonstrate a comparable performance against the state-of-the-art baselines.

2017

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Investigating how well contextual features are captured by bi-directional recurrent neural network models
Kushal Chawla | Sunil Kumar Sahu | Ashish Anand
Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Natural Language Processing (ICON-2017)