Lingjuan Lyu


2023

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Are You Copying My Model? Protecting the Copyright of Large Language Models for EaaS via Backdoor Watermark
Wenjun Peng | Jingwei Yi | Fangzhao Wu | Shangxi Wu | Bin Bin Zhu | Lingjuan Lyu | Binxing Jiao | Tong Xu | Guangzhong Sun | Xing Xie
Proceedings of the 61st Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Large language models (LLMs) have demonstrated powerful capabilities in both text understanding and generation. Companies have begun to offer Embedding as a Service (EaaS) based on these LLMs, which can benefit various natural language processing (NLP) tasks for customers. However, previous studies have shown that EaaS is vulnerable to model extraction attacks, which can cause significant losses for the owners of LLMs, as training these models is extremely expensive. To protect the copyright of LLMs for EaaS, we propose an Embedding Watermark method called {pasted macro ‘METHOD’} that implants backdoors on embeddings. Our method selects a group of moderate-frequency words from a general text corpus to form a trigger set, then selects a target embedding as the watermark, and inserts it into the embeddings of texts containing trigger words as the backdoor. The weight of insertion is proportional to the number of trigger words included in the text. This allows the watermark backdoor to be effectively transferred to EaaS-stealer’s model for copyright verification while minimizing the adverse impact on the original embeddings’ utility. Our extensive experiments on various datasets show that our method can effectively protect the copyright of EaaS models without compromising service quality. Our code is available at https://github.com/yjw1029/EmbMarker.

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GNN-SL: Sequence Labeling Based on Nearest Examples via GNN
Shuhe Wang | Yuxian Meng | Rongbin Ouyang | Jiwei Li | Tianwei Zhang | Lingjuan Lyu | Guoyin Wang
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL 2023

To better handle long-tail cases in the sequence labeling (SL) task, in this work, we introduce graph neural networks sequence labeling (GNN-SL), which augments the vanilla SL model output with similar tagging examples retrieved from the whole training set. Since not all the retrieved tagging examples benefit the model prediction, we construct a heterogeneous graph, and leverage graph neural networks (GNNs) to transfer information between the retrieved tagging examples and the input word sequence. The augmented node which aggregates information from neighbors is used to do prediction. This strategy enables the model to directly acquire similar tagging examples and improves the general quality of predictions. We conduct a variety of experiments on three typical sequence labeling tasks: Named Entity Recognition (NER), Part of Speech Tagging (POS), and Chinese Word Segmentation (CWS) to show the significant performance of our GNN-SL. Notably, GNN-SL achieves SOTA results of 96.9 (+0.2) on PKU, 98.3 (+0.4) on CITYU, 98.5 (+0.2) on MSR, and 96.9 (+0.2) on AS for the CWS task, and resultscomparable to SOTA performances on NER datasets, and POS datasets.

2022

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Student Surpasses Teacher: Imitation Attack for Black-Box NLP APIs
Qiongkai Xu | Xuanli He | Lingjuan Lyu | Lizhen Qu | Gholamreza Haffari
Proceedings of the 29th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

Machine-learning-as-a-service (MLaaS) has attracted millions of users to their splendid large-scale models. Although published as black-box APIs, the valuable models behind these services are still vulnerable to imitation attacks. Recently, a series of works have demonstrated that attackers manage to steal or extract the victim models. Nonetheless, none of the previous stolen models can outperform the original black-box APIs. In this work, we conduct unsupervised domain adaptation and multi-victim ensemble to showing that attackers could potentially surpass victims, which is beyond previous understanding of model extraction. Extensive experiments on both benchmark datasets and real-world APIs validate that the imitators can succeed in outperforming the original black-box models on transferred domains. We consider our work as a milestone in the research of imitation attack, especially on NLP APIs, as the superior performance could influence the defense or even publishing strategy of API providers.

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Extracted BERT Model Leaks More Information than You Think!
Xuanli He | Lingjuan Lyu | Chen Chen | Qiongkai Xu
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

The collection and availability of big data, combined with advances in pre-trained models (e.g. BERT), have revolutionized the predictive performance of natural language processing tasks. This allows corporations to provide machine learning as a service (MLaaS) by encapsulating fine-tuned BERT-based models as APIs. Due to significant commercial interest, there has been a surge of attempts to steal remote services via model extraction. Although previous works have made progress in defending against model extraction attacks, there has been little discussion on their performance in preventing privacy leakage. This work bridges this gap by launching an attribute inference attack against the extracted BERT model. Our extensive experiments reveal that model extraction can cause severe privacy leakage even when victim models are facilitated with state-of-the-art defensive strategies.

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Fine-mixing: Mitigating Backdoors in Fine-tuned Language Models
Zhiyuan Zhang | Lingjuan Lyu | Xingjun Ma | Chenguang Wang | Xu Sun
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2022

Deep Neural Networks (DNNs) are known to be vulnerable to backdoor attacks. In Natural Language Processing (NLP), DNNs are often backdoored during the fine-tuning process of a large-scale Pre-trained Language Model (PLM) with poisoned samples. Although the clean weights of PLMs are readily available, existing methods have ignored this information in defending NLP models against backdoor attacks. In this work, we take the first step to exploit the pre-trained (unfine-tuned) weights to mitigate backdoors in fine-tuned language models. Specifically, we leverage the clean pre-trained weights via two complementary techniques: (1) a two-step Fine-mixing technique, which first mixes the backdoored weights (fine-tuned on poisoned data) with the pre-trained weights, then fine-tunes the mixed weights on a small subset of clean data; (2) an Embedding Purification (E-PUR) technique, which mitigates potential backdoors existing in the word embeddings. We compare Fine-mixing with typical backdoor mitigation methods on three single-sentence sentiment classification tasks and two sentence-pair classification tasks and show that it outperforms the baselines by a considerable margin in all scenarios. We also show that our E-PUR method can benefit existing mitigation methods. Our work establishes a simple but strong baseline defense for secure fine-tuned NLP models against backdoor attacks.

2021

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Model Extraction and Adversarial Transferability, Your BERT is Vulnerable!
Xuanli He | Lingjuan Lyu | Lichao Sun | Qiongkai Xu
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Natural language processing (NLP) tasks, ranging from text classification to text generation, have been revolutionised by the pretrained language models, such as BERT. This allows corporations to easily build powerful APIs by encapsulating fine-tuned BERT models for downstream tasks. However, when a fine-tuned BERT model is deployed as a service, it may suffer from different attacks launched by the malicious users. In this work, we first present how an adversary can steal a BERT-based API service (the victim/target model) on multiple benchmark datasets with limited prior knowledge and queries. We further show that the extracted model can lead to highly transferable adversarial attacks against the victim model. Our studies indicate that the potential vulnerabilities of BERT-based API services still hold, even when there is an architectural mismatch between the victim model and the attack model. Finally, we investigate two defence strategies to protect the victim model, and find that unless the performance of the victim model is sacrificed, both model extraction and adversarial transferability can effectively compromise the target models.

2020

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Differentially Private Representation for NLP: Formal Guarantee and An Empirical Study on Privacy and Fairness
Lingjuan Lyu | Xuanli He | Yitong Li
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2020

It has been demonstrated that hidden representation learned by deep model can encode private information of the input, hence can be exploited to recover such information with reasonable accuracy. To address this issue, we propose a novel approach called Differentially Private Neural Representation (DPNR) to preserve privacy of the extracted representation from text. DPNR utilises Differential Privacy (DP) to provide formal privacy guarantee. Further, we show that masking words via dropout can further enhance privacy. To maintain utility of the learned representation, we integrate DP-noisy representation into a robust training process to derive a robust target model, which also helps for model fairness over various demographic variables. Experimental results on benchmark datasets under various parameter settings demonstrate that DPNR largely reduces privacy leakage without significantly sacrificing the main task performance.