Max Müller-Eberstein


2022

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Sort by Structure: Language Model Ranking as Dependency Probing
Max Müller-Eberstein | Rob van der Goot | Barbara Plank
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Making an informed choice of pre-trained language model (LM) is critical for performance, yet environmentally costly, and as such widely underexplored. The field of Computer Vision has begun to tackle encoder ranking, with promising forays into Natural Language Processing, however they lack coverage of linguistic tasks such as structured prediction. We propose probing to rank LMs, specifically for parsing dependencies in a given language, by measuring the degree to which labeled trees are recoverable from an LM’s contextualized embeddings. Across 46 typologically and architecturally diverse LM-language pairs, our probing approach predicts the best LM choice 79% of the time using orders of magnitude less compute than training a full parser. Within this study, we identify and analyze one recently proposed decoupled LM—RemBERT—and find it strikingly contains less inherent dependency information, but often yields the best parser after full fine-tuning. Without this outlier our approach identifies the best LM in 89% of cases.

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Frustratingly Easy Performance Improvements for Low-resource Setups: A Tale on BERT and Segment Embeddings
Rob van der Goot | Max Müller-Eberstein | Barbara Plank
Proceedings of the Thirteenth Language Resources and Evaluation Conference

As input representation for each sub-word, the original BERT architecture proposes the sum of the sub-word embedding, position embedding and a segment embedding. Sub-word and position embeddings are well-known and studied, and encode lexical information and word position, respectively. In contrast, segment embeddings are less known and have so far received no attention, despite being ubiquitous in large pre-trained language models. The key idea of segment embeddings is to encode to which of the two sentences (segments) a word belongs to — the intuition is to inform the model about the separation of sentences for the next sentence prediction pre-training task. However, little is known on whether the choice of segment impacts performance. In this work, we try to fill this gap and empirically study the impact of the segment embedding during inference time for a variety of pre-trained embeddings and target tasks. We hypothesize that for single-sentence prediction tasks performance is not affected — neither in mono- nor multilingual setups — while it matters when swapping segment IDs in paired-sentence tasks. To our surprise, this is not the case. Although for classification tasks and monolingual BERT models no large differences are observed, particularly word-level multilingual prediction tasks are heavily impacted. For low-resource syntactic tasks, we observe impacts of segment embedding and multilingual BERT choice. We find that the default setting for the most used multilingual BERT model underperforms heavily, and a simple swap of the segment embeddings yields an average improvement of 2.5 points absolute LAS score for dependency parsing over 9 different treebanks.

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On Language Spaces, Scales and Cross-Lingual Transfer of UD Parsers
Tanja Samardžić | Ximena Gutierrez-Vasques | Rob van der Goot | Max Müller-Eberstein | Olga Pelloni | Barbara Plank
Proceedings of the 26th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning (CoNLL)

Cross-lingual transfer of parsing models has been shown to work well for several closely-related languages, but predicting the success in other cases remains hard. Our study is a comprehensive analysis of the impact of linguistic distance on the transfer of UD parsers. As an alternative to syntactic typological distances extracted from URIEL, we propose three text-based feature spaces and show that they can be more precise predictors, especially on a more local scale, when only shorter distances are taken into account. Our analyses also reveal that the good coverage in typological databases is not among the factors that explain good transfer.

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Probing for Labeled Dependency Trees
Max Müller-Eberstein | Rob van der Goot | Barbara Plank
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Probing has become an important tool for analyzing representations in Natural Language Processing (NLP). For graphical NLP tasks such as dependency parsing, linear probes are currently limited to extracting undirected or unlabeled parse trees which do not capture the full task. This work introduces DepProbe, a linear probe which can extract labeled and directed dependency parse trees from embeddings while using fewer parameters and compute than prior methods. Leveraging its full task coverage and lightweight parametrization, we investigate its predictive power for selecting the best transfer language for training a full biaffine attention parser. Across 13 languages, our proposed method identifies the best source treebank 94% of the time, outperforming competitive baselines and prior work. Finally, we analyze the informativeness of task-specific subspaces in contextual embeddings as well as which benefits a full parser’s non-linear parametrization provides.

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Experimental Standards for Deep Learning in Natural Language Processing Research
Dennis Ulmer | Elisa Bassignana | Max Müller-Eberstein | Daniel Varab | Mike Zhang | Rob van der Goot | Christian Hardmeier | Barbara Plank
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2022

The field of Deep Learning (DL) has undergone explosive growth during the last decade, with a substantial impact on Natural Language Processing (NLP) as well. Yet, compared to more established disciplines, a lack of common experimental standards remains an open challenge to the field at large. Starting from fundamental scientific principles, we distill ongoing discussions on experimental standards in NLP into a single, widely-applicable methodology. Following these best practices is crucial to strengthen experimental evidence, improve reproducibility and enable scientific progress. These standards are further collected in a public repository to help them transparently adapt to future needs.

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Evidence > Intuition: Transferability Estimation for Encoder Selection
Elisa Bassignana | Max Müller-Eberstein | Mike Zhang | Barbara Plank
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

With the increase in availability of large pre-trained language models (LMs) in Natural Language Processing (NLP), it becomes critical to assess their fit for a specific target task a priori—as fine-tuning the entire space of available LMs is computationally prohibitive and unsustainable. However, encoder transferability estimation has received little to no attention in NLP. In this paper, we propose to generate quantitative evidence to predict which LM, out of a pool of models, will perform best on a target task without having to fine-tune all candidates. We provide a comprehensive study on LM ranking for 10 NLP tasks spanning the two fundamental problem types of classification and structured prediction. We adopt the state-of-the-art Logarithm of Maximum Evidence (LogME) measure from Computer Vision (CV) and find that it positively correlates with final LM performance in 94% of the setups.In the first study of its kind, we further compare transferability measures with the de facto standard of human practitioner ranking, finding that evidence from quantitative metrics is more robust than pure intuition and can help identify unexpected LM candidates.

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Spectral Probing
Max Müller-Eberstein | Rob van der Goot | Barbara Plank
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Linguistic information is encoded at varying timescales (subwords, phrases, etc.) and communicative levels, such as syntax and semantics. Contextualized embeddings have analogously been found to capture these phenomena at distinctive layers and frequencies. Leveraging these findings, we develop a fully learnable frequency filter to identify spectral profiles for any given task. It enables vastly more granular analyses than prior handcrafted filters, and improves on efficiency. After demonstrating the informativeness of spectral probing over manual filters in a monolingual setting, we investigate its multilingual characteristics across seven diverse NLP tasks in six languages. Our analyses identify distinctive spectral profiles which quantify cross-task similarity in a linguistically intuitive manner, while remaining consistent across languages—highlighting their potential as robust, lightweight task descriptors.

2021

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How Universal is Genre in Universal Dependencies?
Max Müller-Eberstein | Rob van der Goot | Barbara Plank
Proceedings of the 20th International Workshop on Treebanks and Linguistic Theories (TLT, SyntaxFest 2021)

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Genre as Weak Supervision for Cross-lingual Dependency Parsing
Max Müller-Eberstein | Rob van der Goot | Barbara Plank
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Recent work has shown that monolingual masked language models learn to represent data-driven notions of language variation which can be used for domain-targeted training data selection. Dataset genre labels are already frequently available, yet remain largely unexplored in cross-lingual setups. We harness this genre metadata as a weak supervision signal for targeted data selection in zero-shot dependency parsing. Specifically, we project treebank-level genre information to the finer-grained sentence level, with the goal to amplify information implicitly stored in unsupervised contextualized representations. We demonstrate that genre is recoverable from multilingual contextual embeddings and that it provides an effective signal for training data selection in cross-lingual, zero-shot scenarios. For 12 low-resource language treebanks, six of which are test-only, our genre-specific methods significantly outperform competitive baselines as well as recent embedding-based methods for data selection. Moreover, genre-based data selection provides new state-of-the-art results for three of these target languages.