Mosha Chen


2022

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CBLUE: A Chinese Biomedical Language Understanding Evaluation Benchmark
Ningyu Zhang | Mosha Chen | Zhen Bi | Xiaozhuan Liang | Lei Li | Xin Shang | Kangping Yin | Chuanqi Tan | Jian Xu | Fei Huang | Luo Si | Yuan Ni | Guotong Xie | Zhifang Sui | Baobao Chang | Hui Zong | Zheng Yuan | Linfeng Li | Jun Yan | Hongying Zan | Kunli Zhang | Buzhou Tang | Qingcai Chen
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Artificial Intelligence (AI), along with the recent progress in biomedical language understanding, is gradually offering great promise for medical practice. With the development of biomedical language understanding benchmarks, AI applications are widely used in the medical field. However, most benchmarks are limited to English, which makes it challenging to replicate many of the successes in English for other languages. To facilitate research in this direction, we collect real-world biomedical data and present the first Chinese Biomedical Language Understanding Evaluation (CBLUE) benchmark: a collection of natural language understanding tasks including named entity recognition, information extraction, clinical diagnosis normalization, single-sentence/sentence-pair classification, and an associated online platform for model evaluation, comparison, and analysis. To establish evaluation on these tasks, we report empirical results with the current 11 pre-trained Chinese models, and experimental results show that state-of-the-art neural models perform by far worse than the human ceiling.

2021

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damo_nlp at MEDIQA 2021: Knowledge-based Preprocessing and Coverage-oriented Reranking for Medical Question Summarization
Yifan He | Mosha Chen | Songfang Huang
Proceedings of the 20th Workshop on Biomedical Language Processing

Medical question summarization is an important but difficult task, where the input is often complex and erroneous while annotated data is expensive to acquire. We report our participation in the MEDIQA 2021 question summarization task in which we are required to address these challenges. We start from pre-trained conditional generative language models, use knowledge bases to help correct input errors, and rerank single system outputs to boost coverage. Experimental results show significant improvement in string-based metrics.

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Noisy-Labeled NER with Confidence Estimation
Kun Liu | Yao Fu | Chuanqi Tan | Mosha Chen | Ningyu Zhang | Songfang Huang | Sheng Gao
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Recent studies in deep learning have shown significant progress in named entity recognition (NER). However, most existing works assume clean data annotation, while real-world scenarios typically involve a large amount of noises from a variety of sources (e.g., pseudo, weak, or distant annotations). This work studies NER under a noisy labeled setting with calibrated confidence estimation. Based on empirical observations of different training dynamics of noisy and clean labels, we propose strategies for estimating confidence scores based on local and global independence assumptions. We partially marginalize out labels of low confidence with a CRF model. We further propose a calibration method for confidence scores based on the structure of entity labels. We integrate our approach into a self-training framework for boosting performance. Experiments in general noisy settings with four languages and distantly labeled settings demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

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OntoED: Low-resource Event Detection with Ontology Embedding
Shumin Deng | Ningyu Zhang | Luoqiu Li | Chen Hui | Tou Huaixiao | Mosha Chen | Fei Huang | Huajun Chen
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Event Detection (ED) aims to identify event trigger words from a given text and classify it into an event type. Most current methods to ED rely heavily on training instances, and almost ignore the correlation of event types. Hence, they tend to suffer from data scarcity and fail to handle new unseen event types. To address these problems, we formulate ED as a process of event ontology population: linking event instances to pre-defined event types in event ontology, and propose a novel ED framework entitled OntoED with ontology embedding. We enrich event ontology with linkages among event types, and further induce more event-event correlations. Based on the event ontology, OntoED can leverage and propagate correlation knowledge, particularly from data-rich to data-poor event types. Furthermore, OntoED can be applied to new unseen event types, by establishing linkages to existing ones. Experiments indicate that OntoED is more predominant and robust than previous approaches to ED, especially in data-scarce scenarios.

2020

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Predicting Clinical Trial Results by Implicit Evidence Integration
Qiao Jin | Chuanqi Tan | Mosha Chen | Xiaozhong Liu | Songfang Huang
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

Clinical trials provide essential guidance for practicing Evidence-Based Medicine, though often accompanying with unendurable costs and risks. To optimize the design of clinical trials, we introduce a novel Clinical Trial Result Prediction (CTRP) task. In the CTRP framework, a model takes a PICO-formatted clinical trial proposal with its background as input and predicts the result, i.e. how the Intervention group compares with the Comparison group in terms of the measured Outcome in the studied Population. While structured clinical evidence is prohibitively expensive for manual collection, we exploit large-scale unstructured sentences from medical literature that implicitly contain PICOs and results as evidence. Specifically, we pre-train a model to predict the disentangled results from such implicit evidence and fine-tune the model with limited data on the downstream datasets. Experiments on the benchmark Evidence Integration dataset show that the proposed model outperforms the baselines by large margins, e.g., with a 10.7% relative gain over BioBERT in macro-F1. Moreover, the performance improvement is also validated on another dataset composed of clinical trials related to COVID-19.

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OpenUE: An Open Toolkit of Universal Extraction from Text
Ningyu Zhang | Shumin Deng | Zhen Bi | Haiyang Yu | Jiacheng Yang | Mosha Chen | Fei Huang | Wei Zhang | Huajun Chen
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing: System Demonstrations

Natural language processing covers a wide variety of tasks with token-level or sentence-level understandings. In this paper, we provide a simple insight that most tasks can be represented in a single universal extraction format. We introduce a prototype model and provide an open-source and extensible toolkit called OpenUE for various extraction tasks. OpenUE allows developers to train custom models to extract information from the text and supports quick model validation for researchers. Besides, OpenUE provides various functional modules to maintain sufficient modularity and extensibility. Except for the toolkit, we also deploy an online demo with restful APIs to support real-time extraction without training and deploying. Additionally, the online system can extract information in various tasks, including relational triple extraction, slot & intent detection, event extraction, and so on. We release the source code, datasets, and pre-trained models to promote future researches in http://github.com/zjunlp/openue.

2018

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NLP_HZ at SemEval-2018 Task 9: a Nearest Neighbor Approach
Wei Qiu | Mosha Chen | Linlin Li | Luo Si
Proceedings of The 12th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation

Hypernym discovery aims to discover the hypernym word sets given a hyponym word and proper corpus. This paper proposes a simple but effective method for the discovery of hypernym sets based on word embedding, which can be used to measure the contextual similarities between words. Given a test hyponym word, we get its hypernym lists by computing the similarities between the hyponym word and words in the training data, and fill the test word’s hypernym lists with the hypernym list in the training set of the nearest similarity distance to the test word. In SemEval 2018 task9, our results, achieve 1st on Spanish, 2nd on Italian, 6th on English in the metric of MAP.