Mujeen Sung


2021

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Can Language Models be Biomedical Knowledge Bases?
Mujeen Sung | Jinhyuk Lee | Sean Yi | Minji Jeon | Sungdong Kim | Jaewoo Kang
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Pre-trained language models (LMs) have become ubiquitous in solving various natural language processing (NLP) tasks. There has been increasing interest in what knowledge these LMs contain and how we can extract that knowledge, treating LMs as knowledge bases (KBs). While there has been much work on probing LMs in the general domain, there has been little attention to whether these powerful LMs can be used as domain-specific KBs. To this end, we create the BioLAMA benchmark, which is comprised of 49K biomedical factual knowledge triples for probing biomedical LMs. We find that biomedical LMs with recently proposed probing methods can achieve up to 18.51% Acc@5 on retrieving biomedical knowledge. Although this seems promising given the task difficulty, our detailed analyses reveal that most predictions are highly correlated with prompt templates without any subjects, hence producing similar results on each relation and hindering their capabilities to be used as domain-specific KBs. We hope that BioLAMA can serve as a challenging benchmark for biomedical factual probing.

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Learning Dense Representations of Phrases at Scale
Jinhyuk Lee | Mujeen Sung | Jaewoo Kang | Danqi Chen
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Open-domain question answering can be reformulated as a phrase retrieval problem, without the need for processing documents on-demand during inference (Seo et al., 2019). However, current phrase retrieval models heavily depend on sparse representations and still underperform retriever-reader approaches. In this work, we show for the first time that we can learn dense representations of phrases alone that achieve much stronger performance in open-domain QA. We present an effective method to learn phrase representations from the supervision of reading comprehension tasks, coupled with novel negative sampling methods. We also propose a query-side fine-tuning strategy, which can support transfer learning and reduce the discrepancy between training and inference. On five popular open-domain QA datasets, our model DensePhrases improves over previous phrase retrieval models by 15%-25% absolute accuracy and matches the performance of state-of-the-art retriever-reader models. Our model is easy to parallelize due to pure dense representations and processes more than 10 questions per second on CPUs. Finally, we directly use our pre-indexed dense phrase representations for two slot filling tasks, showing the promise of utilizing DensePhrases as a dense knowledge base for downstream tasks.

2020

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Biomedical Entity Representations with Synonym Marginalization
Mujeen Sung | Hwisang Jeon | Jinhyuk Lee | Jaewoo Kang
Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Biomedical named entities often play important roles in many biomedical text mining tools. However, due to the incompleteness of provided synonyms and numerous variations in their surface forms, normalization of biomedical entities is very challenging. In this paper, we focus on learning representations of biomedical entities solely based on the synonyms of entities. To learn from the incomplete synonyms, we use a model-based candidate selection and maximize the marginal likelihood of the synonyms present in top candidates. Our model-based candidates are iteratively updated to contain more difficult negative samples as our model evolves. In this way, we avoid the explicit pre-selection of negative samples from more than 400K candidates. On four biomedical entity normalization datasets having three different entity types (disease, chemical, adverse reaction), our model BioSyn consistently outperforms previous state-of-the-art models almost reaching the upper bound on each dataset.

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Answering Questions on COVID-19 in Real-Time
Jinhyuk Lee | Sean S. Yi | Minbyul Jeong | Mujeen Sung | WonJin Yoon | Yonghwa Choi | Miyoung Ko | Jaewoo Kang
Proceedings of the 1st Workshop on NLP for COVID-19 (Part 2) at EMNLP 2020

The recent outbreak of the novel coronavirus is wreaking havoc on the world and researchers are struggling to effectively combat it. One reason why the fight is difficult is due to the lack of information and knowledge. In this work, we outline our effort to contribute to shrinking this knowledge vacuum by creating covidAsk, a question answering (QA) system that combines biomedical text mining and QA techniques to provide answers to questions in real-time. Our system also leverages information retrieval (IR) approaches to provide entity-level answers that are complementary to QA models. Evaluation of covidAsk is carried out by using a manually created dataset called COVID-19 Questions which is based on information from various sources, including the CDC and the WHO. We hope our system will be able to aid researchers in their search for knowledge and information not only for COVID-19, but for future pandemics as well.

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Adversarial Subword Regularization for Robust Neural Machine Translation
Jungsoo Park | Mujeen Sung | Jinhyuk Lee | Jaewoo Kang
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2020

Exposing diverse subword segmentations to neural machine translation (NMT) models often improves the robustness of machine translation as NMT models can experience various subword candidates. However, the diversification of subword segmentations mostly relies on the pre-trained subword language models from which erroneous segmentations of unseen words are less likely to be sampled. In this paper, we present adversarial subword regularization (ADVSR) to study whether gradient signals during training can be a substitute criterion for exposing diverse subword segmentations. We experimentally show that our model-based adversarial samples effectively encourage NMT models to be less sensitive to segmentation errors and improve the performance of NMT models in low-resource and out-domain datasets.