Nafise Sadat Moosavi

Also published as: Nafise Moosavi, Nafise Sadat Moosavi


2023

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FERMAT: An Alternative to Accuracy for Numerical Reasoning
Jasivan Sivakumar | Nafise Sadat Moosavi
Proceedings of the 61st Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

While pre-trained language models achieve impressive performance on various NLP benchmarks, they still struggle with tasks that require numerical reasoning. Recent advances in improving numerical reasoning are mostly achieved using very large language models that contain billions of parameters and are not accessible to everyone. In addition, numerical reasoning is measured using a single score on existing datasets. As a result, we do not have a clear understanding of the strengths and shortcomings of existing models on different numerical reasoning aspects and therefore, potential ways to improve them apart from scaling them up. Inspired by CheckList (Ribeiro et al., 2020), we introduce a multi-view evaluation set for numerical reasoning in English, called FERMAT. Instead of reporting a single score on a whole dataset, FERMAT evaluates models on various key numerical reasoning aspects such as number understanding, mathematical operations, and training dependency. Apart from providing a comprehensive evaluation of models on different numerical reasoning aspects, FERMAT enables a systematic and automated generation of an arbitrarily large training or evaluation set for each aspect. The datasets and codes are publicly available to generate further multi-view data for ulterior tasks and languages.

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Proceedings of The Fourth Workshop on Simple and Efficient Natural Language Processing (SustaiNLP)
Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Iryna Gurevych | Yufang Hou | Gyuwan Kim | Young Jin Kim | Tal Schuster | Ameeta Agrawal
Proceedings of The Fourth Workshop on Simple and Efficient Natural Language Processing (SustaiNLP)

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Arithmetic-Based Pretraining Improving Numeracy of Pretrained Language Models
Dominic Petrak | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Iryna Gurevych
Proceedings of the 12th Joint Conference on Lexical and Computational Semantics (*SEM 2023)

State-of-the-art pretrained language models tend to perform below their capabilities when applied out-of-the-box on tasks that require understanding and working with numbers (usually referred to as numeracy). Recent work suggests two main reasons for this: (1) popular tokenisation algorithms have limited expressiveness for numbers, and (2) common pretraining objectives do not target numeracy. Approaches that address these shortcomings usually require architectural changes or pretraining from scratch. In this paper, we propose a new extended pretraining approach called Arithmetic-Based Pretraining that jointly addresses both in one extended pretraining step without requiring architectural changes or pretraining from scratch. Arithmetic-Based Pretraining combines contrastive learning to improve the number representation, and a novel extended pretraining objective called Inferable Number Prediction Task to improve numeracy. Our experiments show the effectiveness of Arithmetic-Based Pretraining in three different tasks that require improved numeracy, i.e., reading comprehension in the DROP dataset, inference-on-tables in the InfoTabs dataset, and table-to-text generation in the WikiBio and SciGen datasets.

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Transformers with Learnable Activation Functions
Haishuo Fang | Ji-Ung Lee | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Iryna Gurevych
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EACL 2023

Activation functions can have a significant impact on reducing the topological complexity of input data and therefore, improving a model’s performance. However, the choice of activation functions is seldom discussed or explored in Transformer-based language models. As a common practice, commonly used activation functions like Gaussian Error Linear Unit (GELU) are chosen beforehand and then remain fixed from pre-training to fine-tuning. In this paper, we investigate the impact of activation functions on Transformer-based models by utilizing rational activation functions (RAFs). In contrast to fixed activation functions (FAF), RAFs are capable of learning the optimal activation functions from data. Our experiments show that the RAF-based Transformer model (RAFT) achieves a better performance than its FAF-based counterpart (). For instance, we find that RAFT outperforms on the GLUE benchmark by 5.71 points when using only 100 training examples and by 2.05 points on SQuAD with all available data. Analyzing the shapes of the learned RAFs further unveils that they vary across different layers and different tasks; opening a promising way to better analyze and understand large, pre-trained language models.

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Learning From Free-Text Human Feedback – Collect New Datasets Or Extend Existing Ones?
Dominic Petrak | Nafise Moosavi | Ye Tian | Nikolai Rozanov | Iryna Gurevych
Proceedings of the 2023 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Continuous learning from free-text human feedback, such as error corrections, new knowledge, or alternative responses, is essential for today’s chatbots and virtual assistants to stay up-to-date, engaging, and socially acceptable. However, for research on methods for learning from such data, annotated data is scarce. To address this, we examine the error and user response types of six popular dialogue datasets from various types, including MultiWoZ, PersonaChat, Wizards-of-Wikipedia, and others, to assess their extendibility with the needed annotations. For this corpus study, we manually annotate a subset of each dataset with error and user response types using an improved version of the Integrated Error Taxonomy and a newly proposed user response type taxonomy. We provide the resulting dataset (EURTAD) to the community. Our findings provide new insights into dataset composition, including error types, user response types, and the relations between them.

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The Universal Anaphora Scorer 2.0
Juntao Yu | Michal Novák | Abdulrahman Aloraini | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Silviu Paun | Sameer Pradhan | Massimo Poesio
Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computational Semantics

The aim of the Universal Anaphora initiative is to push forward the state of the art both in anaphora (coreference) annotation and in the evaluation of models for anaphora resolution. The first release of the Universal Anaphora Scorer (Yu et al., 2022b) supported the scoring not only of identity anaphora as in the Reference Coreference Scorer (Pradhan et al., 2014) but also of split antecedent anaphoric reference, bridging references, and discourse deixis. That scorer was used in the CODI-CRAC 2021/2022 Shared Tasks on Anaphora Resolution in Dialogues (Khosla et al., 2021; Yu et al., 2022a). A modified version of the scorer supporting discontinuous markables and the COREFUD markup format was also used in the CRAC 2022 Shared Task on Multilingual Coreference Resolution (Zabokrtsky et al., 2022). In this paper, we introduce the second release of the scorer, merging the two previous versions, which can score reference with discontinuous markables and zero anaphora resolution.

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Lessons Learned from a Citizen Science Project for Natural Language Processing
Jan-Christoph Klie | Ji-Ung Lee | Kevin Stowe | Gözde Şahin | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Luke Bates | Dominic Petrak | Richard Eckart De Castilho | Iryna Gurevych
Proceedings of the 17th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Many Natural Language Processing (NLP) systems use annotated corpora for training and evaluation. However, labeled data is often costly to obtain and scaling annotation projects is difficult, which is why annotation tasks are often outsourced to paid crowdworkers. Citizen Science is an alternative to crowdsourcing that is relatively unexplored in the context of NLP. To investigate whether and how well Citizen Science can be applied in this setting, we conduct an exploratory study into engaging different groups of volunteers in Citizen Science for NLP by re-annotating parts of a pre-existing crowdsourced dataset. Our results show that this can yield high-quality annotations and at- tract motivated volunteers, but also requires considering factors such as scalability, participation over time, and legal and ethical issues. We summarize lessons learned in the form of guidelines and provide our code and data to aid future work on Citizen Science.

2022

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Layer or Representation Space: What Makes BERT-based Evaluation Metrics Robust?
Doan Nam Long Vu | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Steffen Eger
Proceedings of the 29th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

The evaluation of recent embedding-based evaluation metrics for text generation is primarily based on measuring their correlation with human evaluations on standard benchmarks. However, these benchmarks are mostly from similar domains to those used for pretraining word embeddings. This raises concerns about the (lack of) generalization of embedding-based metrics to new and noisy domains that contain a different vocabulary than the pretraining data. In this paper, we examine the robustness of BERTScore, one of the most popular embedding-based metrics for text generation. We show that (a) an embedding-based metric that has the highest correlation with human evaluations on a standard benchmark can have the lowest correlation if the amount of input noise or unknown tokens increases, (b) taking embeddings from the first layer of pretrained models improves the robustness of all metrics, and (c) the highest robustness is achieved when using character-level embeddings, instead of token-based embeddings, from the first layer of the pretrained model.

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Evaluating Coreference Resolvers on Community-based Question Answering: From Rule-based to State of the Art
Haixia Chai | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Iryna Gurevych | Michael Strube
Proceedings of the Fifth Workshop on Computational Models of Reference, Anaphora and Coreference

Coreference resolution is a key step in natural language understanding. Developments in coreference resolution are mainly focused on improving the performance on standard datasets annotated for coreference resolution. However, coreference resolution is an intermediate step for text understanding and it is not clear how these improvements translate into downstream task performance. In this paper, we perform a thorough investigation on the impact of coreference resolvers in multiple settings of community-based question answering task, i.e., answer selection with long answers. Our settings cover multiple text domains and encompass several answer selection methods. We first inspect extrinsic evaluation of coreference resolvers on answer selection by using coreference relations to decontextualize individual sentences of candidate answers, and then annotate a subset of answers with coreference information for intrinsic evaluation. The results of our extrinsic evaluation show that while there is a significant difference between the performance of the rule-based system vs. state-of-the-art neural model on coreference resolution datasets, we do not observe a considerable difference on their impact on downstream models. Our intrinsic evaluation shows that (i) resolving coreference relations on less-formal text genres is more difficult even for trained annotators, and (ii) the values of linguistic-agnostic coreference evaluation metrics do not correlate with the impact on downstream data.

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The Universal Anaphora Scorer
Juntao Yu | Sopan Khosla | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Silviu Paun | Sameer Pradhan | Massimo Poesio
Proceedings of the Thirteenth Language Resources and Evaluation Conference

The aim of the Universal Anaphora initiative is to push forward the state of the art in anaphora and anaphora resolution by expanding the aspects of anaphoric interpretation which are or can be reliably annotated in anaphoric corpora, producing unified standards to annotate and encode these annotations, deliver datasets encoded according to these standards, and developing methods for evaluating models carrying out this type of interpretation. Such expansion of the scope of anaphora resolution requires a comparable expansion of the scope of the scorers used to evaluate this work. In this paper, we introduce an extended version of the Reference Coreference Scorer (Pradhan et al., 2014) that can be used to evaluate the extended range of anaphoric interpretation included in the current Universal Anaphora proposal. The UA scorer supports the evaluation of identity anaphora resolution and of bridging reference resolution, for which scorers already existed but not integrated in a single package. It also supports the evaluation of split antecedent anaphora and discourse deixis, for which no tools existed. The proposed approach to the evaluation of split antecedent anaphora is entirely novel; the proposed approach to the evaluation of discourse deixis leverages the encoding of discourse deixis proposed in Universal Anaphora to enable the use for discourse deixis of the same metrics already used for identity anaphora. The scorer was tested in the recent CODI-CRAC 2021 Shared Task on Anaphora Resolution in Dialogues.

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Proceedings of The Third Workshop on Simple and Efficient Natural Language Processing (SustaiNLP)
Angela Fan | Iryna Gurevych | Yufang Hou | Zornitsa Kozareva | Sasha Luccioni | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Sujith Ravi | Gyuwan Kim | Roy Schwartz | Andreas Rücklé
Proceedings of The Third Workshop on Simple and Efficient Natural Language Processing (SustaiNLP)

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Falsesum: Generating Document-level NLI Examples for Recognizing Factual Inconsistency in Summarization
Prasetya Utama | Joshua Bambrick | Nafise Moosavi | Iryna Gurevych
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Neural abstractive summarization models are prone to generate summaries that are factually inconsistent with their source documents. Previous work has introduced the task of recognizing such factual inconsistency as a downstream application of natural language inference (NLI). However, state-of-the-art NLI models perform poorly in this context due to their inability to generalize to the target task. In this work, we show that NLI models can be effective for this task when the training data is augmented with high-quality task-oriented examples. We introduce Falsesum, a data generation pipeline leveraging a controllable text generation model to perturb human-annotated summaries, introducing varying types of factual inconsistencies. Unlike previously introduced document-level NLI datasets, our generated dataset contains examples that are diverse and inconsistent yet plausible. We show that models trained on a Falsesum-augmented NLI dataset improve the state-of-the-art performance across four benchmarks for detecting factual inconsistency in summarization.

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Adaptable Adapters
Nafise Moosavi | Quentin Delfosse | Kristian Kersting | Iryna Gurevych
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

State-of-the-art pretrained NLP models contain a hundred million to trillion parameters. Adapters provide a parameter-efficient alternative for the full finetuning in which we can only finetune lightweight neural network layers on top of pretrained weights. Adapter layers are initialized randomly. However, existing work uses the same adapter architecture—i.e., the same adapter layer on top of each layer of the pretrained model—for every dataset, regardless of the properties of the dataset or the amount of available training data. In this work, we introduce adaptable adapters that contain (1) learning different activation functions for different layers and different input data, and (2) a learnable switch to select and only use the beneficial adapter layers. We show that adaptable adapters achieve on-par performances with the standard adapter architecture while using a considerably smaller number of adapter layers. In addition, we show that the selected adapter architecture by adaptable adapters transfers well across different data settings and similar tasks. We propose to use adaptable adapters for designing efficient and effective adapter architectures. The resulting adapters (a) contain about 50% of the learning parameters of the standard adapter and are therefore more efficient at training and inference, and require less storage space, and (b) achieve considerably higher performances in low-data settings.

2021

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Coreference Reasoning in Machine Reading Comprehension
Mingzhu Wu | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Dan Roth | Iryna Gurevych
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Coreference resolution is essential for natural language understanding and has been long studied in NLP. In recent years, as the format of Question Answering (QA) became a standard for machine reading comprehension (MRC), there have been data collection efforts, e.g., Dasigi et al. (2019), that attempt to evaluate the ability of MRC models to reason about coreference. However, as we show, coreference reasoning in MRC is a greater challenge than earlier thought; MRC datasets do not reflect the natural distribution and, consequently, the challenges of coreference reasoning. Specifically, success on these datasets does not reflect a model’s proficiency in coreference reasoning. We propose a methodology for creating MRC datasets that better reflect the challenges of coreference reasoning and use it to create a sample evaluation set. The results on our dataset show that state-of-the-art models still struggle with these phenomena. Furthermore, we develop an effective way to use naturally occurring coreference phenomena from existing coreference resolution datasets when training MRC models. This allows us to show an improvement in the coreference reasoning abilities of state-of-the-art models.

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Stay Together: A System for Single and Split-antecedent Anaphora Resolution
Juntao Yu | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Silviu Paun | Massimo Poesio
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

The state-of-the-art on basic, single-antecedent anaphora has greatly improved in recent years. Researchers have therefore started to pay more attention to more complex cases of anaphora such as split-antecedent anaphora, as in “Time-Warner is considering a legal challenge to Telecommunications Inc’s plan to buy half of Showtime Networks Inc–a move that could lead to all-out war between the two powerful companies”. Split-antecedent anaphora is rarer and more complex to resolve than single-antecedent anaphora; as a result, it is not annotated in many datasets designed to test coreference, and previous work on resolving this type of anaphora was carried out in unrealistic conditions that assume gold mentions and/or gold split-antecedent anaphors are available. These systems also focus on split-antecedent anaphors only. In this work, we introduce a system that resolves both single and split-antecedent anaphors, and evaluate it in a more realistic setting that uses predicted mentions. We also start addressing the question of how to evaluate single and split-antecedent anaphors together using standard coreference evaluation metrics.

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Avoiding Inference Heuristics in Few-shot Prompt-based Finetuning
Prasetya Utama | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Victor Sanh | Iryna Gurevych
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Recent prompt-based approaches allow pretrained language models to achieve strong performances on few-shot finetuning by reformulating downstream tasks as a language modeling problem. In this work, we demonstrate that, despite its advantages on low data regimes, finetuned prompt-based models for sentence pair classification tasks still suffer from a common pitfall of adopting inference heuristics based on lexical overlap, e.g., models incorrectly assuming a sentence pair is of the same meaning because they consist of the same set of words. Interestingly, we find that this particular inference heuristic is significantly less present in the zero-shot evaluation of the prompt-based model, indicating how finetuning can be destructive to useful knowledge learned during the pretraining. We then show that adding a regularization that preserves pretraining weights is effective in mitigating this destructive tendency of few-shot finetuning. Our evaluation on three datasets demonstrates promising improvements on the three corresponding challenge datasets used to diagnose the inference heuristics.

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Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Simple and Efficient Natural Language Processing
Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Iryna Gurevych | Angela Fan | Thomas Wolf | Yufang Hou | Ana Marasović | Sujith Ravi
Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Simple and Efficient Natural Language Processing

2020

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Towards Debiasing NLU Models from Unknown Biases
Prasetya Ajie Utama | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Iryna Gurevych
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

NLU models often exploit biases to achieve high dataset-specific performance without properly learning the intended task. Recently proposed debiasing methods are shown to be effective in mitigating this tendency. However, these methods rely on a major assumption that the types of bias should be known a-priori, which limits their application to many NLU tasks and datasets. In this work, we present the first step to bridge this gap by introducing a self-debiasing framework that prevents models from mainly utilizing biases without knowing them in advance. The proposed framework is general and complementary to the existing debiasing methods. We show that it allows these existing methods to retain the improvement on the challenge datasets (i.e., sets of examples designed to expose models’ reliance on biases) without specifically targeting certain biases. Furthermore, the evaluation suggests that applying the framework results in improved overall robustness.

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Mind the Trade-off: Debiasing NLU Models without Degrading the In-distribution Performance
Prasetya Ajie Utama | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Iryna Gurevych
Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Models for natural language understanding (NLU) tasks often rely on the idiosyncratic biases of the dataset, which make them brittle against test cases outside the training distribution. Recently, several proposed debiasing methods are shown to be very effective in improving out-of-distribution performance. However, their improvements come at the expense of performance drop when models are evaluated on the in-distribution data, which contain examples with higher diversity. This seemingly inevitable trade-off may not tell us much about the changes in the reasoning and understanding capabilities of the resulting models on broader types of examples beyond the small subset represented in the out-of-distribution data. In this paper, we address this trade-off by introducing a novel debiasing method, called confidence regularization, which discourage models from exploiting biases while enabling them to receive enough incentive to learn from all the training examples. We evaluate our method on three NLU tasks and show that, in contrast to its predecessors, it improves the performance on out-of-distribution datasets (e.g., 7pp gain on HANS dataset) while maintaining the original in-distribution accuracy.

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Free the Plural: Unrestricted Split-Antecedent Anaphora Resolution
Juntao Yu | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Silviu Paun | Massimo Poesio
Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

Now that the performance of coreference resolvers on the simpler forms of anaphoric reference has greatly improved, more attention is devoted to more complex aspects of anaphora. One limitation of virtually all coreference resolution models is the focus on single-antecedent anaphors. Plural anaphors with multiple antecedents-so-called split-antecedent anaphors (as in John met Mary. They went to the movies) have not been widely studied, because they are not annotated in ONTONOTES and are relatively infrequent in other corpora. In this paper, we introduce the first model for unrestricted resolution of split-antecedent anaphors. We start with a strong baseline enhanced by BERT embeddings, and show that we can substantially improve its performance by addressing the sparsity issue. To do this, we experiment with auxiliary corpora where split-antecedent anaphors were annotated by the crowd, and with transfer learning models using element-of bridging references and single-antecedent coreference as auxiliary tasks. Evaluation on the gold annotated ARRAU corpus shows that the out best model uses a combination of three auxiliary corpora achieved F1 scores of 70% and 43.6% when evaluated in a lenient and strict setting, respectively, i.e., 11 and 21 percentage points gain when compared with our baseline.

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Proceedings of SustaiNLP: Workshop on Simple and Efficient Natural Language Processing
Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Angela Fan | Vered Shwartz | Goran Glavaš | Shafiq Joty | Alex Wang | Thomas Wolf
Proceedings of SustaiNLP: Workshop on Simple and Efficient Natural Language Processing

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Improving QA Generalization by Concurrent Modeling of Multiple Biases
Mingzhu Wu | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Andreas Rücklé | Iryna Gurevych
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2020

Existing NLP datasets contain various biases that models can easily exploit to achieve high performances on the corresponding evaluation sets. However, focusing on dataset-specific biases limits their ability to learn more generalizable knowledge about the task from more general data patterns. In this paper, we investigate the impact of debiasing methods for improving generalization and propose a general framework for improving the performance on both in-domain and out-of-domain datasets by concurrent modeling of multiple biases in the training data. Our framework weights each example based on the biases it contains and the strength of those biases in the training data. It then uses these weights in the training objective so that the model relies less on examples with high bias weights. We extensively evaluate our framework on extractive question answering with training data from various domains with multiple biases of different strengths. We perform the evaluations in two different settings, in which the model is trained on a single domain or multiple domains simultaneously, and show its effectiveness in both settings compared to state-of-the-art debiasing methods.

2019

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Using Automatically Extracted Minimum Spans to Disentangle Coreference Evaluation from Boundary Detection
Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Leo Born | Massimo Poesio | Michael Strube
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

The common practice in coreference resolution is to identify and evaluate the maximum span of mentions. The use of maximum spans tangles coreference evaluation with the challenges of mention boundary detection like prepositional phrase attachment. To address this problem, minimum spans are manually annotated in smaller corpora. However, this additional annotation is costly and therefore, this solution does not scale to large corpora. In this paper, we propose the MINA algorithm for automatically extracting minimum spans to benefit from minimum span evaluation in all corpora. We show that the extracted minimum spans by MINA are consistent with those that are manually annotated by experts. Our experiments show that using minimum spans is in particular important in cross-dataset coreference evaluation, in which detected mention boundaries are noisier due to domain shift. We have integrated MINA into https://github.com/ns-moosavi/coval for reporting standard coreference scores based on both maximum and automatically detected minimum spans.

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Neural Duplicate Question Detection without Labeled Training Data
Andreas Rücklé | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Iryna Gurevych
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing and the 9th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (EMNLP-IJCNLP)

Supervised training of neural models to duplicate question detection in community Question Answering (CQA) requires large amounts of labeled question pairs, which can be costly to obtain. To minimize this cost, recent works thus often used alternative methods, e.g., adversarial domain adaptation. In this work, we propose two novel methods—weak supervision using the title and body of a question, and the automatic generation of duplicate questions—and show that both can achieve improved performances even though they do not require any labeled data. We provide a comparison of popular training strategies and show that our proposed approaches are more effective in many cases because they can utilize larger amounts of data from the CQA forums. Finally, we show that weak supervision with question title and body information is also an effective method to train CQA answer selection models without direct answer supervision.

2018

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Using Linguistic Features to Improve the Generalization Capability of Neural Coreference Resolvers
Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Michael Strube
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Coreference resolution is an intermediate step for text understanding. It is used in tasks and domains for which we do not necessarily have coreference annotated corpora. Therefore, generalization is of special importance for coreference resolution. However, while recent coreference resolvers have notable improvements on the CoNLL dataset, they struggle to generalize properly to new domains or datasets. In this paper, we investigate the role of linguistic features in building more generalizable coreference resolvers. We show that generalization improves only slightly by merely using a set of additional linguistic features. However, employing features and subsets of their values that are informative for coreference resolution, considerably improves generalization. Thanks to better generalization, our system achieves state-of-the-art results in out-of-domain evaluations, e.g., on WikiCoref, our system, which is trained on CoNLL, achieves on-par performance with a system designed for this dataset.

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Anaphora Resolution with the ARRAU Corpus
Massimo Poesio | Yulia Grishina | Varada Kolhatkar | Nafise Moosavi | Ina Roesiger | Adam Roussel | Fabian Simonjetz | Alexandra Uma | Olga Uryupina | Juntao Yu | Heike Zinsmeister
Proceedings of the First Workshop on Computational Models of Reference, Anaphora and Coreference

The ARRAU corpus is an anaphorically annotated corpus of English providing rich linguistic information about anaphora resolution. The most distinctive feature of the corpus is the annotation of a wide range of anaphoric relations, including bridging references and discourse deixis in addition to identity (coreference). Other distinctive features include treating all NPs as markables, including non-referring NPs; and the annotation of a variety of morphosyntactic and semantic mention and entity attributes, including the genericity status of the entities referred to by markables. The corpus however has not been extensively used for anaphora resolution research so far. In this paper, we discuss three datasets extracted from the ARRAU corpus to support the three subtasks of the CRAC 2018 Shared Task–identity anaphora resolution over ARRAU-style markables, bridging references resolution, and discourse deixis; the evaluation scripts assessing system performance on those datasets; and preliminary results on these three tasks that may serve as baseline for subsequent research in these phenomena.

2017

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Lexical Features in Coreference Resolution: To be Used With Caution
Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Michael Strube
Proceedings of the 55th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 2: Short Papers)

Lexical features are a major source of information in state-of-the-art coreference resolvers. Lexical features implicitly model some of the linguistic phenomena at a fine granularity level. They are especially useful for representing the context of mentions. In this paper we investigate a drawback of using many lexical features in state-of-the-art coreference resolvers. We show that if coreference resolvers mainly rely on lexical features, they can hardly generalize to unseen domains. Furthermore, we show that the current coreference resolution evaluation is clearly flawed by only evaluating on a specific split of a specific dataset in which there is a notable overlap between the training, development and test sets.

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Revisiting Selectional Preferences for Coreference Resolution
Benjamin Heinzerling | Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Michael Strube
Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Selectional preferences have long been claimed to be essential for coreference resolution. However, they are modeled only implicitly by current coreference resolvers. We propose a dependency-based embedding model of selectional preferences which allows fine-grained compatibility judgments with high coverage. Incorporating our model improves performance, matching state-of-the-art results of a more complex system. However, it comes with a cost that makes it debatable how worthwhile are such improvements.

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Use Generalized Representations, But Do Not Forget Surface Features
Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Michael Strube
Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Coreference Resolution Beyond OntoNotes (CORBON 2017)

Only a year ago, all state-of-the-art coreference resolvers were using an extensive amount of surface features. Recently, there was a paradigm shift towards using word embeddings and deep neural networks, where the use of surface features is very limited. In this paper, we show that a simple SVM model with surface features outperforms more complex neural models for detecting anaphoric mentions. Our analysis suggests that using generalized representations and surface features have different strength that should be both taken into account for improving coreference resolution.

2016

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Search Space Pruning: A Simple Solution for Better Coreference Resolvers
Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Michael Strube
Proceedings of the 2016 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

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Which Coreference Evaluation Metric Do You Trust? A Proposal for a Link-based Entity Aware Metric
Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Michael Strube
Proceedings of the 54th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

2014

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Unsupervised Coreference Resolution by Utilizing the Most Informative Relations
Nafise Sadat Moosavi | Michael Strube
Proceedings of COLING 2014, the 25th International Conference on Computational Linguistics: Technical Papers