Nathan Chi


2022

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RNRE-NLP at SemEval-2022 Task 4: Patronizing and Condescending Language Detection
Rylan Yang | Ethan Chi | Nathan Chi
Proceedings of the 16th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation (SemEval-2022)

An understanding of patronizing and condescending language detection is an important part of identifying and addressing discrimination and prejudice in various forms of communication. In this paper, we investigate several methods for detecting patronizing and condescending language in short statements as part of SemEval-2022 Task 4. For Task 1a, we investigate applying both lightweight (tree-based and linear) machine learning classification models and fine-tuned pre-trained large language models. Our final system achieves an F1-score of 0.4321, recall-score of 0.5016, and a precision-score of 0.3795 (ranked 53 / 78) on Task 1a.

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ISD at SemEval-2022 Task 6: Sarcasm Detection Using Lightweight Models
Samantha Huang | Ethan Chi | Nathan Chi
Proceedings of the 16th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation (SemEval-2022)

A robust comprehension of sarcasm detection iscritical for creating artificial systems that can ef-fectively perform sentiment analysis in writtentext. In this work, we investigate AI approachesto identifying whether a text is sarcastic or notas part of SemEval-2022 Task 6. We focus oncreating systems for Task A, where we experi-ment with lightweight statistical classificationapproaches trained on both GloVe features andmanually-selected features. Additionally, weinvestigate fine-tuning the transformer modelBERT. Our final system for Task A is an Ex-treme Gradient Boosting Classifier trained onmanually-engineered features. Our final sys-tem achieved an F1-score of 0.2403 on SubtaskA and was ranked 32 of 43.

2021

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RedwoodNLP at SemEval-2021 Task 7: Ensembled Pretrained and Lightweight Models for Humor Detection
Nathan Chi | Ryan Chi
Proceedings of the 15th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation (SemEval-2021)

An understanding of humor is an essential component of human-facing NLP systems. In this paper, we investigate several methods for detecting humor in short statements as part of Semeval-2021 Shared Task 7. For Task 1a, we apply an ensemble of fine-tuned pre-trained language models; for Tasks 1b, 1c, and 2a, we investigate various tree-based and linear machine learning models. Our final system achieves an F1-score of 0.9571 (ranked 24 / 58) on Task 1a, an RMSE of 0.5580 (ranked 18 / 50) on Task 1b, an F1-score of 0.5024 (ranked 26 / 36) on Task 1c, and an RMSE of 0.7229 (ranked 45 / 48) on Task 2a.