Nelson F. Liu

Also published as: Nelson Liu


2021

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Lexical Semantic Recognition
Nelson F. Liu | Daniel Hershcovich | Michael Kranzlein | Nathan Schneider
Proceedings of the 17th Workshop on Multiword Expressions (MWE 2021)

In lexical semantics, full-sentence segmentation and segment labeling of various phenomena are generally treated separately, despite their interdependence. We hypothesize that a unified lexical semantic recognition task is an effective way to encapsulate previously disparate styles of annotation, including multiword expression identification / classification and supersense tagging. Using the STREUSLE corpus, we train a neural CRF sequence tagger and evaluate its performance along various axes of annotation. As the label set generalizes that of previous tasks (PARSEME, DiMSUM), we additionally evaluate how well the model generalizes to those test sets, finding that it approaches or surpasses existing models despite training only on STREUSLE. Our work also establishes baseline models and evaluation metrics for integrated and accurate modeling of lexical semantics, facilitating future work in this area.

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Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Student Research Workshop
Esin Durmus | Vivek Gupta | Nelson Liu | Nanyun Peng | Yu Su
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Student Research Workshop

2020

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Evaluating Models’ Local Decision Boundaries via Contrast Sets
Matt Gardner | Yoav Artzi | Victoria Basmov | Jonathan Berant | Ben Bogin | Sihao Chen | Pradeep Dasigi | Dheeru Dua | Yanai Elazar | Ananth Gottumukkala | Nitish Gupta | Hannaneh Hajishirzi | Gabriel Ilharco | Daniel Khashabi | Kevin Lin | Jiangming Liu | Nelson F. Liu | Phoebe Mulcaire | Qiang Ning | Sameer Singh | Noah A. Smith | Sanjay Subramanian | Reut Tsarfaty | Eric Wallace | Ally Zhang | Ben Zhou
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2020

Standard test sets for supervised learning evaluate in-distribution generalization. Unfortunately, when a dataset has systematic gaps (e.g., annotation artifacts), these evaluations are misleading: a model can learn simple decision rules that perform well on the test set but do not capture the abilities a dataset is intended to test. We propose a more rigorous annotation paradigm for NLP that helps to close systematic gaps in the test data. In particular, after a dataset is constructed, we recommend that the dataset authors manually perturb the test instances in small but meaningful ways that (typically) change the gold label, creating contrast sets. Contrast sets provide a local view of a model’s decision boundary, which can be used to more accurately evaluate a model’s true linguistic capabilities. We demonstrate the efficacy of contrast sets by creating them for 10 diverse NLP datasets (e.g., DROP reading comprehension, UD parsing, and IMDb sentiment analysis). Although our contrast sets are not explicitly adversarial, model performance is significantly lower on them than on the original test sets—up to 25% in some cases. We release our contrast sets as new evaluation benchmarks and encourage future dataset construction efforts to follow similar annotation processes.

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Proceedings of Second Workshop for NLP Open Source Software (NLP-OSS)
Eunjeong L. Park | Masato Hagiwara | Dmitrijs Milajevs | Nelson F. Liu | Geeticka Chauhan | Liling Tan
Proceedings of Second Workshop for NLP Open Source Software (NLP-OSS)

2019

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Quoref: A Reading Comprehension Dataset with Questions Requiring Coreferential Reasoning
Pradeep Dasigi | Nelson F. Liu | Ana Marasović | Noah A. Smith | Matt Gardner
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing and the 9th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (EMNLP-IJCNLP)

Machine comprehension of texts longer than a single sentence often requires coreference resolution. However, most current reading comprehension benchmarks do not contain complex coreferential phenomena and hence fail to evaluate the ability of models to resolve coreference. We present a new crowdsourced dataset containing more than 24K span-selection questions that require resolving coreference among entities in over 4.7K English paragraphs from Wikipedia. Obtaining questions focused on such phenomena is challenging, because it is hard to avoid lexical cues that shortcut complex reasoning. We deal with this issue by using a strong baseline model as an adversary in the crowdsourcing loop, which helps crowdworkers avoid writing questions with exploitable surface cues. We show that state-of-the-art reading comprehension models perform significantly worse than humans on this benchmark—the best model performance is 70.5 F1, while the estimated human performance is 93.4 F1.

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Linguistic Knowledge and Transferability of Contextual Representations
Nelson F. Liu | Matt Gardner | Yonatan Belinkov | Matthew E. Peters | Noah A. Smith
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 1 (Long and Short Papers)

Contextual word representations derived from large-scale neural language models are successful across a diverse set of NLP tasks, suggesting that they encode useful and transferable features of language. To shed light on the linguistic knowledge they capture, we study the representations produced by several recent pretrained contextualizers (variants of ELMo, the OpenAI transformer language model, and BERT) with a suite of sixteen diverse probing tasks. We find that linear models trained on top of frozen contextual representations are competitive with state-of-the-art task-specific models in many cases, but fail on tasks requiring fine-grained linguistic knowledge (e.g., conjunct identification). To investigate the transferability of contextual word representations, we quantify differences in the transferability of individual layers within contextualizers, especially between recurrent neural networks (RNNs) and transformers. For instance, higher layers of RNNs are more task-specific, while transformer layers do not exhibit the same monotonic trend. In addition, to better understand what makes contextual word representations transferable, we compare language model pretraining with eleven supervised pretraining tasks. For any given task, pretraining on a closely related task yields better performance than language model pretraining (which is better on average) when the pretraining dataset is fixed. However, language model pretraining on more data gives the best results.

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Inoculation by Fine-Tuning: A Method for Analyzing Challenge Datasets
Nelson F. Liu | Roy Schwartz | Noah A. Smith
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 1 (Long and Short Papers)

Several datasets have recently been constructed to expose brittleness in models trained on existing benchmarks. While model performance on these challenge datasets is significantly lower compared to the original benchmark, it is unclear what particular weaknesses they reveal. For example, a challenge dataset may be difficult because it targets phenomena that current models cannot capture, or because it simply exploits blind spots in a model’s specific training set. We introduce inoculation by fine-tuning, a new analysis method for studying challenge datasets by exposing models (the metaphorical patient) to a small amount of data from the challenge dataset (a metaphorical pathogen) and assessing how well they can adapt. We apply our method to analyze the NLI “stress tests” (Naik et al., 2018) and the Adversarial SQuAD dataset (Jia and Liang, 2017). We show that after slight exposure, some of these datasets are no longer challenging, while others remain difficult. Our results indicate that failures on challenge datasets may lead to very different conclusions about models, training datasets, and the challenge datasets themselves.

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Barack’s Wife Hillary: Using Knowledge Graphs for Fact-Aware Language Modeling
Robert Logan | Nelson F. Liu | Matthew E. Peters | Matt Gardner | Sameer Singh
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Modeling human language requires the ability to not only generate fluent text but also encode factual knowledge. However, traditional language models are only capable of remembering facts seen at training time, and often have difficulty recalling them. To address this, we introduce the knowledge graph language model (KGLM), a neural language model with mechanisms for selecting and copying facts from a knowledge graph that are relevant to the context. These mechanisms enable the model to render information it has never seen before, as well as generate out-of-vocabulary tokens. We also introduce the Linked WikiText-2 dataset, a corpus of annotated text aligned to the Wikidata knowledge graph whose contents (roughly) match the popular WikiText-2 benchmark. In experiments, we demonstrate that the KGLM achieves significantly better performance than a strong baseline language model. We additionally compare different language model’s ability to complete sentences requiring factual knowledge, showing that the KGLM outperforms even very large language models in generating facts.

2018

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Discovering Phonesthemes with Sparse Regularization
Nelson F. Liu | Gina-Anne Levow | Noah A. Smith
Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Subword/Character LEvel Models

We introduce a simple method for extracting non-arbitrary form-meaning representations from a collection of semantic vectors. We treat the problem as one of feature selection for a model trained to predict word vectors from subword features. We apply this model to the problem of automatically discovering phonesthemes, which are submorphemic sound clusters that appear in words with similar meaning. Many of our model-predicted phonesthemes overlap with those proposed in the linguistics literature, and we validate our approach with human judgments.

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AllenNLP: A Deep Semantic Natural Language Processing Platform
Matt Gardner | Joel Grus | Mark Neumann | Oyvind Tafjord | Pradeep Dasigi | Nelson F. Liu | Matthew Peters | Michael Schmitz | Luke Zettlemoyer
Proceedings of Workshop for NLP Open Source Software (NLP-OSS)

Modern natural language processing (NLP) research requires writing code. Ideally this code would provide a precise definition of the approach, easy repeatability of results, and a basis for extending the research. However, many research codebases bury high-level parameters under implementation details, are challenging to run and debug, and are difficult enough to extend that they are more likely to be rewritten. This paper describes AllenNLP, a library for applying deep learning methods to NLP research that addresses these issues with easy-to-use command-line tools, declarative configuration-driven experiments, and modular NLP abstractions. AllenNLP has already increased the rate of research experimentation and the sharing of NLP components at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence, and we are working to have the same impact across the field.

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LSTMs Exploit Linguistic Attributes of Data
Nelson F. Liu | Omer Levy | Roy Schwartz | Chenhao Tan | Noah A. Smith
Proceedings of The Third Workshop on Representation Learning for NLP

While recurrent neural networks have found success in a variety of natural language processing applications, they are general models of sequential data. We investigate how the properties of natural language data affect an LSTM’s ability to learn a nonlinguistic task: recalling elements from its input. We find that models trained on natural language data are able to recall tokens from much longer sequences than models trained on non-language sequential data. Furthermore, we show that the LSTM learns to solve the memorization task by explicitly using a subset of its neurons to count timesteps in the input. We hypothesize that the patterns and structure in natural language data enable LSTMs to learn by providing approximate ways of reducing loss, but understanding the effect of different training data on the learnability of LSTMs remains an open question.

2017

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Crowdsourcing Multiple Choice Science Questions
Johannes Welbl | Nelson F. Liu | Matt Gardner
Proceedings of the 3rd Workshop on Noisy User-generated Text

We present a novel method for obtaining high-quality, domain-targeted multiple choice questions from crowd workers. Generating these questions can be difficult without trading away originality, relevance or diversity in the answer options. Our method addresses these problems by leveraging a large corpus of domain-specific text and a small set of existing questions. It produces model suggestions for document selection and answer distractor choice which aid the human question generation process. With this method we have assembled SciQ, a dataset of 13.7K multiple choice science exam questions. We demonstrate that the method produces in-domain questions by providing an analysis of this new dataset and by showing that humans cannot distinguish the crowdsourced questions from original questions. When using SciQ as additional training data to existing questions, we observe accuracy improvements on real science exams.