Panupong Pasupat


2023

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Retrieval-Augmented Parsing for Complex Graphs by Exploiting Structure and Uncertainty
Zi Lin | Quan Yuan | Panupong Pasupat | Jeremiah Liu | Jingbo Shang
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2023

Retrieval augmentation enhances generative language models by retrieving informative exemplars relevant for output prediction. However, in realistic graph parsing problems where the output space is large and complex, classic retrieval methods based on input-sentence similarity can fail to identify the most informative exemplars that target graph elements the model is most struggling about, leading to suboptimal retrieval and compromised prediction under limited retrieval budget. In this work, we improve retrieval-augmented parsing for complex graph problems by exploiting two unique sources of information (1) structural similarity and (2) model uncertainty. We propose Structure-aware and Uncertainty-Guided Adaptive Retrieval (SUGAR) that first quantify the model uncertainty in graph prediction and identify its most uncertain subgraphs, and then retrieve exemplars based on their structural similarity with the identified uncertain subgraphs. On a suite of real-world parsing benchmarks with non-trivial graph structure (SMCalflow and E-commerce), SUGAR exhibits a strong advantage over its classic counterparts that do not leverage structure or model uncertainty.

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RARR: Researching and Revising What Language Models Say, Using Language Models
Luyu Gao | Zhuyun Dai | Panupong Pasupat | Anthony Chen | Arun Tejasvi Chaganty | Yicheng Fan | Vincent Zhao | Ni Lao | Hongrae Lee | Da-Cheng Juan | Kelvin Guu
Proceedings of the 61st Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Language models (LMs) now excel at many tasks such as question answering, reasoning, and dialog. However, they sometimes generate unsupported or misleading content. A user cannot easily determine whether their outputs are trustworthy or not, because most LMs do not have any built-in mechanism for attribution to external evidence. To enable attribution while still preserving all the powerful advantages of recent generation models, we propose RARR (Retrofit Attribution using Research and Revision), a system that 1) automatically finds attribution for the output of any text generation model, and 2) post-edits the output to fix unsupported content while preserving the original output as much as possible. When applied to the output of several state-of-the-art LMs on a diverse set of generation tasks, we find that RARR significantly improves attribution while otherwise preserving the original input to a much greater degree than previously explored edit models. Furthermore, the implementation of RARR requires only a handful of training examples, a large language model, and standard web search.

2022

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Generate-and-Retrieve: Use Your Predictions to Improve Retrieval for Semantic Parsing
Yury Zemlyanskiy | Michiel de Jong | Joshua Ainslie | Panupong Pasupat | Peter Shaw | Linlu Qiu | Sumit Sanghai | Fei Sha
Proceedings of the 29th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

A common recent approach to semantic parsing augments sequence-to-sequence models by retrieving and appending a set of training samples, called exemplars. The effectiveness of this recipe is limited by the ability to retrieve informative exemplars that help produce the correct parse, which is especially challenging in low-resource settings. Existing retrieval is commonly based on similarity of query and exemplar inputs. We propose GandR, a retrieval procedure that retrieves exemplars for which outputs are also similar. GandR first generates a preliminary prediction with input-based retrieval. Then, it retrieves exemplars with outputs similar to the preliminary prediction which are used to generate a final prediction. GandR sets the state of the art on multiple low-resource semantic parsing tasks.

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Improving Compositional Generalization with Latent Structure and Data Augmentation
Linlu Qiu | Peter Shaw | Panupong Pasupat | Pawel Nowak | Tal Linzen | Fei Sha | Kristina Toutanova
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Generic unstructured neural networks have been shown to struggle on out-of-distribution compositional generalization. Compositional data augmentation via example recombination has transferred some prior knowledge about compositionality to such black-box neural models for several semantic parsing tasks, but this often required task-specific engineering or provided limited gains. We present a more powerful data recombination method using a model called Compositional Structure Learner (CSL). CSL is a generative model with a quasi-synchronous context-free grammar backbone, which we induce from the training data. We sample recombined examples from CSL and add them to the fine-tuning data of a pre-trained sequence-to-sequence model (T5). This procedure effectively transfers most of CSL’s compositional bias to T5 for diagnostic tasks, and results in a model even stronger than a T5-CSL ensemble on two real world compositional generalization tasks. This results in new state-of-the-art performance for these challenging semantic parsing tasks requiring generalization to both natural language variation and novel compositions of elements.

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Evaluating the Impact of Model Scale for Compositional Generalization in Semantic Parsing
Linlu Qiu | Peter Shaw | Panupong Pasupat | Tianze Shi | Jonathan Herzig | Emily Pitler | Fei Sha | Kristina Toutanova
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Despite their strong performance on many tasks, pre-trained language models have been shown to struggle on out-of-distribution compositional generalization. Meanwhile, recent work has shown considerable improvements on many NLP tasks from model scaling. Can scaling up model size also improve compositional generalization in semantic parsing? We evaluate encoder-decoder models up to 11B parameters and decoder-only models up to 540B parameters, and compare model scaling curves for three different methods for applying a pre-trained language model to a new task: fine-tuning all parameters, prompt tuning, and in-context learning. We observe that fine-tuning generally has flat or negative scaling curves on out-of-distribution compositional generalization in semantic parsing evaluations. In-context learning has positive scaling curves, but is generally outperformed by much smaller fine-tuned models. Prompt-tuning can outperform fine-tuning, suggesting further potential improvements from scaling as it exhibits a more positive scaling curve. Additionally, we identify several error trends that vary with model scale. For example, larger models are generally better at modeling the syntax of the output space, but are also more prone to certain types of overfitting. Overall, our study highlights limitations of current techniques for effectively leveraging model scale for compositional generalization, while our analysis also suggests promising directions for future work.

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Meta-Learning Fast Weight Language Models
Kevin Clark | Kelvin Guu | Ming-Wei Chang | Panupong Pasupat | Geoffrey Hinton | Mohammad Norouzi
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Dynamic evaluation of language models (LMs) adapts model parameters at test time using gradient information from previous tokens and substantially improves LM performance. However, it requires over 3x more compute than standard inference. We present Fast Weight Layers (FWLs), a neural component that provides the benefits of dynamic evaluation much more efficiently by expressing gradient updates as linear attention. A key improvement over dynamic evaluation is that FWLs can also be applied at training time, so the model learns to make good use of gradient updates. FWLs can easily be added on top of existing transformer models, require relatively little extra compute or memory to run, and significantly improve language modeling perplexity.

2021

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Few-shot Intent Classification and Slot Filling with Retrieved Examples
Dian Yu | Luheng He | Yuan Zhang | Xinya Du | Panupong Pasupat | Qi Li
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Few-shot learning arises in important practical scenarios, such as when a natural language understanding system needs to learn new semantic labels for an emerging, resource-scarce domain. In this paper, we explore retrieval-based methods for intent classification and slot filling tasks in few-shot settings. Retrieval-based methods make predictions based on labeled examples in the retrieval index that are similar to the input, and thus can adapt to new domains simply by changing the index without having to retrain the model. However, it is non-trivial to apply such methods on tasks with a complex label space like slot filling. To this end, we propose a span-level retrieval method that learns similar contextualized representations for spans with the same label via a novel batch-softmax objective. At inference time, we use the labels of the retrieved spans to construct the final structure with the highest aggregated score. Our method outperforms previous systems in various few-shot settings on the CLINC and SNIPS benchmarks.

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Graph-Based Decoding for Task Oriented Semantic Parsing
Jeremy Cole | Nanjiang Jiang | Panupong Pasupat | Luheng He | Peter Shaw
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2021

The dominant paradigm for semantic parsing in recent years is to formulate parsing as a sequence-to-sequence task, generating predictions with auto-regressive sequence decoders. In this work, we explore an alternative paradigm. We formulate semantic parsing as a dependency parsing task, applying graph-based decoding techniques developed for syntactic parsing. We compare various decoding techniques given the same pre-trained Transformer encoder on the TOP dataset, including settings where training data is limited or contains only partially-annotated examples. We find that our graph-based approach is competitive with sequence decoders on the standard setting, and offers significant improvements in data efficiency and settings where partially-annotated data is available.

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Compositional Generalization and Natural Language Variation: Can a Semantic Parsing Approach Handle Both?
Peter Shaw | Ming-Wei Chang | Panupong Pasupat | Kristina Toutanova
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Sequence-to-sequence models excel at handling natural language variation, but have been shown to struggle with out-of-distribution compositional generalization. This has motivated new specialized architectures with stronger compositional biases, but most of these approaches have only been evaluated on synthetically-generated datasets, which are not representative of natural language variation. In this work we ask: can we develop a semantic parsing approach that handles both natural language variation and compositional generalization? To better assess this capability, we propose new train and test splits of non-synthetic datasets. We demonstrate that strong existing approaches do not perform well across a broad set of evaluations. We also propose NQG-T5, a hybrid model that combines a high-precision grammar-based approach with a pre-trained sequence-to-sequence model. It outperforms existing approaches across several compositional generalization challenges on non-synthetic data, while also being competitive with the state-of-the-art on standard evaluations. While still far from solving this problem, our study highlights the importance of diverse evaluations and the open challenge of handling both compositional generalization and natural language variation in semantic parsing.

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QA-Driven Zero-shot Slot Filling with Weak Supervision Pretraining
Xinya Du | Luheng He | Qi Li | Dian Yu | Panupong Pasupat | Yuan Zhang
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 2: Short Papers)

Slot-filling is an essential component for building task-oriented dialog systems. In this work, we focus on the zero-shot slot-filling problem, where the model needs to predict slots and their values, given utterances from new domains without training on the target domain. Prior methods directly encode slot descriptions to generalize to unseen slot types. However, raw slot descriptions are often ambiguous and do not encode enough semantic information, limiting the models’ zero-shot capability. To address this problem, we introduce QA-driven slot filling (QASF), which extracts slot-filler spans from utterances with a span-based QA model. We use a linguistically motivated questioning strategy to turn descriptions into questions, allowing the model to generalize to unseen slot types. Moreover, our QASF model can benefit from weak supervision signals from QA pairs synthetically generated from unlabeled conversations. Our full system substantially outperforms baselines by over 5% on the SNIPS benchmark.

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Controllable Semantic Parsing via Retrieval Augmentation
Panupong Pasupat | Yuan Zhang | Kelvin Guu
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

In practical applications of semantic parsing, we often want to rapidly change the behavior of the parser, such as enabling it to handle queries in a new domain, or changing its predictions on certain targeted queries. While we can introduce new training examples exhibiting the target behavior, a mechanism for enacting such behavior changes without expensive model re-training would be preferable. To this end, we propose ControllAble Semantic Parser via Exemplar Retrieval (CASPER). Given an input query, the parser retrieves related exemplars from a retrieval index, augments them to the query, and then applies a generative seq2seq model to produce an output parse. The exemplars act as a control mechanism over the generic generative model: by manipulating the retrieval index or how the augmented query is constructed, we can manipulate the behavior of the parser. On the MTOP dataset, in addition to achieving state-of-the-art on the standard setup, we show that CASPER can parse queries in a new domain, adapt the prediction toward the specified patterns, or adapt to new semantic schemas without having to further re-train the model.

2019

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Span-based Hierarchical Semantic Parsing for Task-Oriented Dialog
Panupong Pasupat | Sonal Gupta | Karishma Mandyam | Rushin Shah | Mike Lewis | Luke Zettlemoyer
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing and the 9th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (EMNLP-IJCNLP)

We propose a semantic parser for parsing compositional utterances into Task Oriented Parse (TOP), a tree representation that has intents and slots as labels of nesting tree nodes. Our parser is span-based: it scores labels of the tree nodes covering each token span independently, but then decodes a valid tree globally. In contrast to previous sequence decoding approaches and other span-based parsers, we (1) improve the training speed by removing the need to run the decoder at training time; and (2) introduce edge scores, which model relations between parent and child labels, to mitigate the independence assumption between node labels and improve accuracy. Our best parser outperforms previous methods on the TOP dataset of mixed-domain task-oriented utterances in both accuracy and training speed.

2018

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Mapping natural language commands to web elements
Panupong Pasupat | Tian-Shun Jiang | Evan Liu | Kelvin Guu | Percy Liang
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

The web provides a rich, open-domain environment with textual, structural, and spatial properties. We propose a new task for grounding language in this environment: given a natural language command (e.g., “click on the second article”), choose the correct element on the web page (e.g., a hyperlink or text box). We collected a dataset of over 50,000 commands that capture various phenomena such as functional references (e.g. “find who made this site”), relational reasoning (e.g. “article by john”), and visual reasoning (e.g. “top-most article”). We also implemented and analyzed three baseline models that capture different phenomena present in the dataset.

2017

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Macro Grammars and Holistic Triggering for Efficient Semantic Parsing
Yuchen Zhang | Panupong Pasupat | Percy Liang
Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

To learn a semantic parser from denotations, a learning algorithm must search over a combinatorially large space of logical forms for ones consistent with the annotated denotations. We propose a new online learning algorithm that searches faster as training progresses. The two key ideas are using macro grammars to cache the abstract patterns of useful logical forms found thus far, and holistic triggering to efficiently retrieve the most relevant patterns based on sentence similarity. On the WikiTableQuestions dataset, we first expand the search space of an existing model to improve the state-of-the-art accuracy from 38.7% to 42.7%, and then use macro grammars and holistic triggering to achieve an 11x speedup and an accuracy of 43.7%.

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From Language to Programs: Bridging Reinforcement Learning and Maximum Marginal Likelihood
Kelvin Guu | Panupong Pasupat | Evan Liu | Percy Liang
Proceedings of the 55th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Our goal is to learn a semantic parser that maps natural language utterances into executable programs when only indirect supervision is available: examples are labeled with the correct execution result, but not the program itself. Consequently, we must search the space of programs for those that output the correct result, while not being misled by spurious programs: incorrect programs that coincidentally output the correct result. We connect two common learning paradigms, reinforcement learning (RL) and maximum marginal likelihood (MML), and then present a new learning algorithm that combines the strengths of both. The new algorithm guards against spurious programs by combining the systematic search traditionally employed in MML with the randomized exploration of RL, and by updating parameters such that probability is spread more evenly across consistent programs. We apply our learning algorithm to a new neural semantic parser and show significant gains over existing state-of-the-art results on a recent context-dependent semantic parsing task.

2016

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Inferring Logical Forms From Denotations
Panupong Pasupat | Percy Liang
Proceedings of the 54th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

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Simpler Context-Dependent Logical Forms via Model Projections
Reginald Long | Panupong Pasupat | Percy Liang
Proceedings of the 54th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

2015

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Compositional Semantic Parsing on Semi-Structured Tables
Panupong Pasupat | Percy Liang
Proceedings of the 53rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 7th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

2014

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Zero-shot Entity Extraction from Web Pages
Panupong Pasupat | Percy Liang
Proceedings of the 52nd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)