Pararth Shah


2022

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Improving Top-K Decoding for Non-Autoregressive Semantic Parsing via Intent Conditioning
Geunseob Oh | Rahul Goel | Chris Hidey | Shachi Paul | Aditya Gupta | Pararth Shah | Rushin Shah
Proceedings of the 29th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

Semantic parsing (SP) is a core component of modern virtual assistants like Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa. While sequence-to-sequence based auto-regressive (AR) approaches are common for conversational SP, recent studies employ non-autoregressive (NAR) decoders and reduce inference latency while maintaining competitive parsing quality. However, a major drawback of NAR decoders is the difficulty of generating top-k (i.e., k-best) outputs with approaches such as beam search. To address this challenge, we propose a novel NAR semantic parser that introduces intent conditioning on the decoder. Inspired by the traditional intent and slot tagging parsers, we decouple the top-level intent prediction from the rest of a parse. As the top-level intent largely governs the syntax and semantics of a parse, the intent conditioning allows the model to better control beam search and improves the quality and diversity of top-k outputs. We introduce a hybrid teacher-forcing approach to avoid training and inference mismatch. We evaluate the proposed NAR on conversational SP datasets, TOP & TOPv2. Like the existing NAR models, we maintain the O(1) decoding time complexity while generating more diverse outputs and improving top-3 exact match (EM) by 2.4 points. In comparison with AR models, our model speeds up beam search inference by 6.7 times on CPU with competitive top-k EM.

2020

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User Memory Reasoning for Conversational Recommendation
Hu Xu | Seungwhan Moon | Honglei Liu | Bing Liu | Pararth Shah | Bing Liu | Philip Yu
Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

We study an end-to-end approach for conversational recommendation that dynamically manages and reasons over users’ past (offline) preferences and current (online) requests through a structured and cumulative user memory knowledge graph. This formulation extends existing state tracking beyond the boundary of a single dialog to user state tracking (UST). For this study, we create a new Memory Graph (MG) <-> Conversational Recommendation parallel corpus called MGConvRex with 7K+ human-to-human role-playing dialogs, grounded on a large-scale user memory bootstrapped from real-world user scenarios. MGConvRex captures human-level reasoning over user memory and has disjoint training/testing sets of users for zero-shot (cold-start) reasoning for recommendation. We propose a simple yet expandable formulation for constructing and updating the MG, and an end-to-end graph-based reasoning model that updates MG from unstructured utterances and predicts optimal dialog policies (eg recommendation) based on updated MG. The prediction of our proposed model inherits the graph structure, providing a natural way to explain policies. Experiments are conducted for both offline metrics and online simulation, showing competitive results.

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Resource Constrained Dialog Policy Learning Via Differentiable Inductive Logic Programming
Zhenpeng Zhou | Ahmad Beirami | Paul Crook | Pararth Shah | Rajen Subba | Alborz Geramifard
Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

Motivated by the needs of resource constrained dialog policy learning, we introduce dialog policy via differentiable inductive logic (DILOG). We explore the tasks of one-shot learning and zero-shot domain transfer with DILOG on SimDial and MultiWoZ. Using a single representative dialog from the restaurant domain, we train DILOG on the SimDial dataset and obtain 99+% in-domain test accuracy. We also show that the trained DILOG zero-shot transfers to all other domains with 99+% accuracy, proving the suitability of DILOG to slot-filling dialogs. We further extend our study to the MultiWoZ dataset achieving 90+% inform and success metrics. We also observe that these metrics are not capturing some of the shortcomings of DILOG in terms of false positives, prompting us to measure an auxiliary Action F1 score. We show that DILOG is 100x more data efficient than state-of-the-art neural approaches on MultiWoZ while achieving similar performance metrics. We conclude with a discussion on the strengths and weaknesses of DILOG.

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Multi-Action Dialog Policy Learning with Interactive Human Teaching
Megha Jhunjhunwala | Caleb Bryant | Pararth Shah
Proceedings of the 21th Annual Meeting of the Special Interest Group on Discourse and Dialogue

We present a framework for improving task-oriented dialog systems through online interactive teaching with human trainers. A dialog policy trained with imitation learning on a limited corpus may not generalize well to novel dialog flows often uncovered in live interactions. This issue is magnified in multi-action dialog policies which have a more expressive action space. In our approach, a pre-trained dialog policy model interacts with human trainers, and at each turn the trainers choose the best output among N-best multi-action outputs. We present a novel multi-domain, multi-action dialog policy architecture trained on MultiWOZ, and show that small amounts of online supervision can lead to significant improvement in model performance. We also present transfer learning results which show that interactive learning in one domain improves policy model performance in related domains.

2019

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OpenDialKG: Explainable Conversational Reasoning with Attention-based Walks over Knowledge Graphs
Seungwhan Moon | Pararth Shah | Anuj Kumar | Rajen Subba
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

We study a conversational reasoning model that strategically traverses through a large-scale common fact knowledge graph (KG) to introduce engaging and contextually diverse entities and attributes. For this study, we collect a new Open-ended Dialog <-> KG parallel corpus called OpenDialKG, where each utterance from 15K human-to-human role-playing dialogs is manually annotated with ground-truth reference to corresponding entities and paths from a large-scale KG with 1M+ facts. We then propose the DialKG Walker model that learns the symbolic transitions of dialog contexts as structured traversals over KG, and predicts natural entities to introduce given previous dialog contexts via a novel domain-agnostic, attention-based graph path decoder. Automatic and human evaluations show that our model can retrieve more natural and human-like responses than the state-of-the-art baselines or rule-based models, in both in-domain and cross-domain tasks. The proposed model also generates a KG walk path for each entity retrieved, providing a natural way to explain conversational reasoning.

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Recommendation as a Communication Game: Self-Supervised Bot-Play for Goal-oriented Dialogue
Dongyeop Kang | Anusha Balakrishnan | Pararth Shah | Paul Crook | Y-Lan Boureau | Jason Weston
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing and the 9th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (EMNLP-IJCNLP)

Traditional recommendation systems produce static rather than interactive recommendations invariant to a user’s specific requests, clarifications, or current mood, and can suffer from the cold-start problem if their tastes are unknown. These issues can be alleviated by treating recommendation as an interactive dialogue task instead, where an expert recommender can sequentially ask about someone’s preferences, react to their requests, and recommend more appropriate items. In this work, we collect a goal-driven recommendation dialogue dataset (GoRecDial), which consists of 9,125 dialogue games and 81,260 conversation turns between pairs of human workers recommending movies to each other. The task is specifically designed as a cooperative game between two players working towards a quantifiable common goal. We leverage the dataset to develop an end-to-end dialogue system that can simultaneously converse and recommend. Models are first trained to imitate the behavior of human players without considering the task goal itself (supervised training). We then finetune our models on simulated bot-bot conversations between two paired pre-trained models (bot-play), in order to achieve the dialogue goal. Our experiments show that models finetuned with bot-play learn improved dialogue strategies, reach the dialogue goal more often when paired with a human, and are rated as more consistent by humans compared to models trained without bot-play. The dataset and code are publicly available through the ParlAI framework.

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Memory Grounded Conversational Reasoning
Seungwhan Moon | Pararth Shah | Rajen Subba | Anuj Kumar
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing and the 9th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (EMNLP-IJCNLP): System Demonstrations

We demonstrate a conversational system which engages the user through a multi-modal, multi-turn dialog over the user’s memories. The system can perform QA over memories by responding to user queries to recall specific attributes and associated media (e.g. photos) of past episodic memories. The system can also make proactive suggestions to surface related events or facts from past memories to make conversations more engaging and natural. To implement such a system, we collect a new corpus of memory grounded conversations, which comprises human-to-human role-playing dialogs given synthetic memory graphs with simulated attributes. Our proof-of-concept system operates on these synthetic memory graphs, however it can be trained and applied to real-world user memory data (e.g. photo albums, etc.) We present the architecture of the proposed conversational system, and example queries that the system supports.

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Memory Graph Networks for Explainable Memory-grounded Question Answering
Seungwhan Moon | Pararth Shah | Anuj Kumar | Rajen Subba
Proceedings of the 23rd Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning (CoNLL)

We introduce Episodic Memory QA, the task of answering personal user questions grounded on memory graph (MG), where episodic memories and related entity nodes are connected via relational edges. We create a new benchmark dataset first by generating synthetic memory graphs with simulated attributes, and by composing 100K QA pairs for the generated MG with bootstrapped scripts. To address the unique challenges for the proposed task, we propose Memory Graph Networks (MGN), a novel extension of memory networks to enable dynamic expansion of memory slots through graph traversals, thus able to answer queries in which contexts from multiple linked episodes and external knowledge are required. We then propose the Episodic Memory QA Net with multiple module networks to effectively handle various question types. Empirical results show improvement over the QA baselines in top-k answer prediction accuracy in the proposed task. The proposed model also generates a graph walk path and attention vectors for each predicted answer, providing a natural way to explain its QA reasoning.

2018

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Dialogue Learning with Human Teaching and Feedback in End-to-End Trainable Task-Oriented Dialogue Systems
Bing Liu | Gokhan Tür | Dilek Hakkani-Tür | Pararth Shah | Larry Heck
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 1 (Long Papers)

In this work, we present a hybrid learning method for training task-oriented dialogue systems through online user interactions. Popular methods for learning task-oriented dialogues include applying reinforcement learning with user feedback on supervised pre-training models. Efficiency of such learning method may suffer from the mismatch of dialogue state distribution between offline training and online interactive learning stages. To address this challenge, we propose a hybrid imitation and reinforcement learning method, with which a dialogue agent can effectively learn from its interaction with users by learning from human teaching and feedback. We design a neural network based task-oriented dialogue agent that can be optimized end-to-end with the proposed learning method. Experimental results show that our end-to-end dialogue agent can learn effectively from the mistake it makes via imitation learning from user teaching. Applying reinforcement learning with user feedback after the imitation learning stage further improves the agent’s capability in successfully completing a task.

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Bootstrapping a Neural Conversational Agent with Dialogue Self-Play, Crowdsourcing and On-Line Reinforcement Learning
Pararth Shah | Dilek Hakkani-Tür | Bing Liu | Gokhan Tür
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 3 (Industry Papers)

End-to-end neural models show great promise towards building conversational agents that are trained from data and on-line experience using supervised and reinforcement learning. However, these models require a large corpus of dialogues to learn effectively. For goal-oriented dialogues, such datasets are expensive to collect and annotate, since each task involves a separate schema and database of entities. Further, the Wizard-of-Oz approach commonly used for dialogue collection does not provide sufficient coverage of salient dialogue flows, which is critical for guaranteeing an acceptable task completion rate in consumer-facing conversational agents. In this paper, we study a recently proposed approach for building an agent for arbitrary tasks by combining dialogue self-play and crowd-sourcing to generate fully-annotated dialogues with diverse and natural utterances. We discuss the advantages of this approach for industry applications of conversational agents, wherein an agent can be rapidly bootstrapped to deploy in front of users and further optimized via interactive learning from actual users of the system.

2015

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An Approach to Collective Entity Linking
Ashish Kulkarni | Kanika Agarwal | Pararth Shah | Sunny Raj Rathod | Ganesh Ramakrishnan
Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Natural Language Processing