Paweł Kamocki

Also published as: Pawel Kamocki


2020

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Privacy by Design and Language Resources
Pawel Kamocki | Andreas Witt
Proceedings of the 12th Language Resources and Evaluation Conference

Privacy by Design (also referred to as Data Protection by Design) is an approach in which solutions and mechanisms addressing privacy and data protection are embedded through the entire project lifecycle, from the early design stage, rather than just added as an additional lawyer to the final product. Formulated in the 1990 by the Privacy Commissionner of Ontario, the principle of Privacy by Design has been discussed by institutions and policymakers on both sides of the Atlantic, and mentioned already in the 1995 EU Data Protection Directive (95/46/EC). More recently, Privacy by Design was introduced as one of the requirements of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), obliging data controllers to define and adopt, already at the conception phase, appropriate measures and safeguards to implement data protection principles and protect the rights of the data subject. Failing to meet this obligation may result in a hefty fine, as it was the case in the Uniontrad decision by the French Data Protection Authority (CNIL). The ambition of the proposed paper is to analyse the practical meaning of Privacy by Design in the context of Language Resources, and propose measures and safeguards that can be implemented by the community to ensure respect of this principle.

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Addressing Cha(lle)nges in Long-Term Archiving of Large Corpora
Denis Arnold | Bernhard Fisseni | Pawel Kamocki | Oliver Schonefeld | Marc Kupietz | Thomas Schmidt
Proceedings of the 8th Workshop on Challenges in the Management of Large Corpora

This paper addresses long-term archival for large corpora. Three aspects specific to language resources are focused, namely (1) the removal of resources for legal reasons, (2) versioning of (unchanged) objects in constantly growing resources, especially where objects can be part of multiple releases but also part of different collections, and (3) the conversion of data to new formats for digital preservation. It is motivated why language resources may have to be changed, and why formats may need to be converted. As a solution, the use of an intermediate proxy object called a signpost is suggested. The approach will be exemplified with respect to the corpora of the Leibniz Institute for the German Language in Mannheim, namely the German Reference Corpus (DeReKo) and the Archive for Spoken German (AGD).

2018

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Data Management Plan (DMP) for Language Data under the New General Da-ta Protection Regulation (GDPR)
Pawel Kamocki | Valérie Mapelli | Khalid Choukri
Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC 2018)

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New directions in ELRA activities
Valérie Mapelli | Victoria Arranz | Hélène Mazo | Pawel Kamocki | Vladimir Popescu
Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC 2018)

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The German Reference Corpus DeReKo: New Developments – New Opportunities
Marc Kupietz | Harald Lüngen | Paweł Kamocki | Andreas Witt
Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC 2018)

2016

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The Public License Selector: Making Open Licensing Easier
Pawel Kamocki | Pavel Straňák | Michal Sedlák
Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'16)

Researchers in Natural Language Processing rely on availability of data and software, ideally under open licenses, but little is done to actively encourage it. In fact, the current Copyright framework grants exclusive rights to authors to copy their works, make them available to the public and make derivative works (such as annotated language corpora). Moreover, in the EU databases are protected against unauthorized extraction and re-utilization of their contents. Therefore, proper public licensing plays a crucial role in providing access to research data. A public license is a license that grants certain rights not to one particular user, but to the general public (everybody). Our article presents a tool that we developed and whose purpose is to assist the user in the licensing process. As software and data should be licensed under different licenses, the tool is composed of two separate parts: Data and Software. The underlying logic as well as elements of the graphic interface are presented below.

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Privacy Issues in Online Machine Translation Services - European Perspective
Pawel Kamocki | Jim O’Regan
Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'16)

In order to develop its full potential, global communication needs linguistic support systems such as Machine Translation (MT). In the past decade, free online MT tools have become available to the general public, and the quality of their output is increasing. However, the use of such tools may entail various legal implications, especially as far as processing of personal data is concerned. This is even more evident if we take into account that their business model is largely based on providing translation in exchange for data, which can subsequently be used to improve the translation model, but also for commercial purposes. The purpose of this paper is to examine how free online MT tools fit in the European data protection framework, harmonised by the EU Data Protection Directive. The perspectives of both the user and the MT service provider are taken into account.

2014

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The liability of service providers in e-Research Infrastructures: killing the messenger?
Pawel Kamocki
Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'14)

Hosting Providers play an essential role in the development of Internet services such as e-Research Infrastructures. In order to promote the development of such services, legislators on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean introduced “safe harbour” provisions to protect Service Providers (a category which includes Hosting Providers) from legal claims (e.g. of copyright infringement). Relevant provisions can be found in § 512 of the United States Copyright Act and in art. 14 of the Directive 2000/31/EC (and its national implementations). The cornerstone of this framework is the passive role of the Hosting Provider through which he has no knowledge of the content that he hosts. With the arrival of Web 2.0, however, the role of Hosting Providers on the Internet changed; this change has been reflected in court decisions that have reached varying conclusions in the last few years. The purpose of this article is to present the existing framework (including recent case law from the US, Germany and France).