Qingkai Fang


2022

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Neural Machine Translation with Phrase-Level Universal Visual Representations
Qingkai Fang | Yang Feng
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Multimodal machine translation (MMT) aims to improve neural machine translation (NMT) with additional visual information, but most existing MMT methods require paired input of source sentence and image, which makes them suffer from shortage of sentence-image pairs. In this paper, we propose a phrase-level retrieval-based method for MMT to get visual information for the source input from existing sentence-image data sets so that MMT can break the limitation of paired sentence-image input. Our method performs retrieval at the phrase level and hence learns visual information from pairs of source phrase and grounded region, which can mitigate data sparsity. Furthermore, our method employs the conditional variational auto-encoder to learn visual representations which can filter redundant visual information and only retain visual information related to the phrase. Experiments show that the proposed method significantly outperforms strong baselines on multiple MMT datasets, especially when the textual context is limited.

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STEMM: Self-learning with Speech-text Manifold Mixup for Speech Translation
Qingkai Fang | Rong Ye | Lei Li | Yang Feng | Mingxuan Wang
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

How to learn a better speech representation for end-to-end speech-to-text translation (ST) with limited labeled data? Existing techniques often attempt to transfer powerful machine translation (MT) capabilities to ST, but neglect the representation discrepancy across modalities. In this paper, we propose the Speech-TExt Manifold Mixup (STEMM) method to calibrate such discrepancy. Specifically, we mix up the representation sequences of different modalities, and take both unimodal speech sequences and multimodal mixed sequences as input to the translation model in parallel, and regularize their output predictions with a self-learning framework. Experiments on MuST-C speech translation benchmark and further analysis show that our method effectively alleviates the cross-modal representation discrepancy, and achieves significant improvements over a strong baseline on eight translation directions.