Rahul Aralikatte


2021

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Itihasa: A large-scale corpus for Sanskrit to English translation
Rahul Aralikatte | Miryam de Lhoneux | Anoop Kunchukuttan | Anders Søgaard
Proceedings of the 8th Workshop on Asian Translation (WAT2021)

This work introduces Itihasa, a large-scale translation dataset containing 93,000 pairs of Sanskrit shlokas and their English translations. The shlokas are extracted from two Indian epics viz., The Ramayana and The Mahabharata. We first describe the motivation behind the curation of such a dataset and follow up with empirical analysis to bring out its nuances. We then benchmark the performance of standard translation models on this corpus and show that even state-of-the-art transformer architectures perform poorly, emphasizing the complexity of the dataset.

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How far can we get with one GPU in 100 hours? CoAStaL at MultiIndicMT Shared Task
Rahul Aralikatte | Héctor Ricardo Murrieta Bello | Miryam de Lhoneux | Daniel Hershcovich | Marcel Bollmann | Anders Søgaard
Proceedings of the 8th Workshop on Asian Translation (WAT2021)

This work shows that competitive translation results can be obtained in a constrained setting by incorporating the latest advances in memory and compute optimization. We train and evaluate large multilingual translation models using a single GPU for a maximum of 100 hours and get within 4-5 BLEU points of the top submission on the leaderboard. We also benchmark standard baselines on the PMI corpus and re-discover well-known shortcomings of translation systems and metrics.

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Ellipsis Resolution as Question Answering: An Evaluation
Rahul Aralikatte | Matthew Lamm | Daniel Hardt | Anders Søgaard
Proceedings of the 16th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Main Volume

Most, if not all forms of ellipsis (e.g., so does Mary) are similar to reading comprehension questions (what does Mary do), in that in order to resolve them, we need to identify an appropriate text span in the preceding discourse. Following this observation, we present an alternative approach for English ellipsis resolution relying on architectures developed for question answering (QA). We present both single-task models, and joint models trained on auxiliary QA and coreference resolution datasets, clearly outperforming the current state of the art for Sluice Ellipsis (from 70.00 to 86.01 F1) and Verb Phrase Ellipsis (from 72.89 to 78.66 F1).

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Focus Attention: Promoting Faithfulness and Diversity in Summarization
Rahul Aralikatte | Shashi Narayan | Joshua Maynez | Sascha Rothe | Ryan McDonald
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Professional summaries are written with document-level information, such as the theme of the document, in mind. This is in contrast with most seq2seq decoders which simultaneously learn to focus on salient content, while deciding what to generate, at each decoding step. With the motivation to narrow this gap, we introduce Focus Attention Mechanism, a simple yet effective method to encourage decoders to proactively generate tokens that are similar or topical to the input document. Further, we propose a Focus Sampling method to enable generation of diverse summaries, an area currently understudied in summarization. When evaluated on the BBC extreme summarization task, two state-of-the-art models augmented with Focus Attention generate summaries that are closer to the target and more faithful to their input documents, outperforming their vanilla counterparts on ROUGE and multiple faithfulness measures. We also empirically demonstrate that Focus Sampling is more effective in generating diverse and faithful summaries than top-k or nucleus sampling-based decoding methods.

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Minimax and Neyman–Pearson Meta-Learning for Outlier Languages
Edoardo Maria Ponti | Rahul Aralikatte | Disha Shrivastava | Siva Reddy | Anders Søgaard
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL-IJCNLP 2021

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Moses and the Character-Based Random Babbling Baseline: CoAStaL at AmericasNLP 2021 Shared Task
Marcel Bollmann | Rahul Aralikatte | Héctor Murrieta Bello | Daniel Hershcovich | Miryam de Lhoneux | Anders Søgaard
Proceedings of the First Workshop on Natural Language Processing for Indigenous Languages of the Americas

We evaluated a range of neural machine translation techniques developed specifically for low-resource scenarios. Unsuccessfully. In the end, we submitted two runs: (i) a standard phrase-based model, and (ii) a random babbling baseline using character trigrams. We found that it was surprisingly hard to beat (i), in spite of this model being, in theory, a bad fit for polysynthetic languages; and more interestingly, that (ii) was better than several of the submitted systems, highlighting how difficult low-resource machine translation for polysynthetic languages is.

2020

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Model-based Annotation of Coreference
Rahul Aralikatte | Anders Søgaard
Proceedings of the 12th Language Resources and Evaluation Conference

Humans do not make inferences over texts, but over models of what texts are about. When annotators are asked to annotate coreferent spans of text, it is therefore a somewhat unnatural task. This paper presents an alternative in which we preprocess documents, linking entities to a knowledge base, and turn the coreference annotation task – in our case limited to pronouns – into an annotation task where annotators are asked to assign pronouns to entities. Model-based annotation is shown to lead to faster annotation and higher inter-annotator agreement, and we argue that it also opens up an alternative approach to coreference resolution. We present two new coreference benchmark datasets, for English Wikipedia and English teacher-student dialogues, and evaluate state-of-the-art coreference resolvers on them.

2019

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Rewarding Coreference Resolvers for Being Consistent with World Knowledge
Rahul Aralikatte | Heather Lent | Ana Valeria Gonzalez | Daniel Herschcovich | Chen Qiu | Anders Sandholm | Michael Ringaard | Anders Søgaard
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing and the 9th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (EMNLP-IJCNLP)

Unresolved coreference is a bottleneck for relation extraction, and high-quality coreference resolvers may produce an output that makes it a lot easier to extract knowledge triples. We show how to improve coreference resolvers by forwarding their input to a relation extraction system and reward the resolvers for producing triples that are found in knowledge bases. Since relation extraction systems can rely on different forms of supervision and be biased in different ways, we obtain the best performance, improving over the state of the art, using multi-task reinforcement learning.

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X-WikiRE: A Large, Multilingual Resource for Relation Extraction as Machine Comprehension
Mostafa Abdou | Cezar Sas | Rahul Aralikatte | Isabelle Augenstein | Anders Søgaard
Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Deep Learning Approaches for Low-Resource NLP (DeepLo 2019)

Although the vast majority of knowledge bases (KBs) are heavily biased towards English, Wikipedias do cover very different topics in different languages. Exploiting this, we introduce a new multilingual dataset (X-WikiRE), framing relation extraction as a multilingual machine reading problem. We show that by leveraging this resource it is possible to robustly transfer models cross-lingually and that multilingual support significantly improves (zero-shot) relation extraction, enabling the population of low-resourced KBs from their well-populated counterparts.

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Compositional Generalization in Image Captioning
Mitja Nikolaus | Mostafa Abdou | Matthew Lamm | Rahul Aralikatte | Desmond Elliott
Proceedings of the 23rd Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning (CoNLL)

Image captioning models are usually evaluated on their ability to describe a held-out set of images, not on their ability to generalize to unseen concepts. We study the problem of compositional generalization, which measures how well a model composes unseen combinations of concepts when describing images. State-of-the-art image captioning models show poor generalization performance on this task. We propose a multi-task model to address the poor performance, that combines caption generation and image–sentence ranking, and uses a decoding mechanism that re-ranks the captions according their similarity to the image. This model is substantially better at generalizing to unseen combinations of concepts compared to state-of-the-art captioning models.

2018

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DuoRC: Towards Complex Language Understanding with Paraphrased Reading Comprehension
Amrita Saha | Rahul Aralikatte | Mitesh M. Khapra | Karthik Sankaranarayanan
Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

We propose DuoRC, a novel dataset for Reading Comprehension (RC) that motivates several new challenges for neural approaches in language understanding beyond those offered by existing RC datasets. DuoRC contains 186,089 unique question-answer pairs created from a collection of 7680 pairs of movie plots where each pair in the collection reflects two versions of the same movie - one from Wikipedia and the other from IMDb - written by two different authors. We asked crowdsourced workers to create questions from one version of the plot and a different set of workers to extract or synthesize answers from the other version. This unique characteristic of DuoRC where questions and answers are created from different versions of a document narrating the same underlying story, ensures by design, that there is very little lexical overlap between the questions created from one version and the segments containing the answer in the other version. Further, since the two versions have different levels of plot detail, narration style, vocabulary, etc., answering questions from the second version requires deeper language understanding and incorporating external background knowledge. Additionally, the narrative style of passages arising from movie plots (as opposed to typical descriptive passages in existing datasets) exhibits the need to perform complex reasoning over events across multiple sentences. Indeed, we observe that state-of-the-art neural RC models which have achieved near human performance on the SQuAD dataset, even when coupled with traditional NLP techniques to address the challenges presented in DuoRC exhibit very poor performance (F1 score of 37.42% on DuoRC v/s 86% on SQuAD dataset). This opens up several interesting research avenues wherein DuoRC could complement other RC datasets to explore novel neural approaches for studying language understanding.

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Sanskrit Sandhi Splitting using seq2(seq)2
Rahul Aralikatte | Neelamadhav Gantayat | Naveen Panwar | Anush Sankaran | Senthil Mani
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

In Sanskrit, small words (morphemes) are combined to form compound words through a process known as Sandhi. Sandhi splitting is the process of splitting a given compound word into its constituent morphemes. Although rules governing word splitting exists in the language, it is highly challenging to identify the location of the splits in a compound word. Though existing Sandhi splitting systems incorporate these pre-defined splitting rules, they have a low accuracy as the same compound word might be broken down in multiple ways to provide syntactically correct splits. In this research, we propose a novel deep learning architecture called Double Decoder RNN (DD-RNN), which (i) predicts the location of the split(s) with 95% accuracy, and (ii) predicts the constituent words (learning the Sandhi splitting rules) with 79.5% accuracy, outperforming the state-of-art by 20%. Additionally, we show the generalization capability of our deep learning model, by showing competitive results in the problem of Chinese word segmentation, as well.