Ricardo Henao


2022

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Few-Shot Class-Incremental Learning for Named Entity Recognition
Rui Wang | Tong Yu | Handong Zhao | Sungchul Kim | Subrata Mitra | Ruiyi Zhang | Ricardo Henao
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Previous work of class-incremental learning for Named Entity Recognition (NER) relies on the assumption that there exists abundance of labeled data for the training of new classes. In this work, we study a more challenging but practical problem, i.e., few-shot class-incremental learning for NER, where an NER model is trained with only few labeled samples of the new classes, without forgetting knowledge of the old ones. To alleviate the problem of catastrophic forgetting in few-shot class-incremental learning, we reconstruct synthetic training data of the old classes using the trained NER model, augmenting the training of new classes. We further develop a framework that distills from the existing model with both synthetic data, and real data from the current training set. Experimental results show that our approach achieves significant improvements over existing baselines.

2021

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SpanPredict: Extraction of Predictive Document Spans with Neural Attention
Vivek Subramanian | Matthew Engelhard | Sam Berchuck | Liqun Chen | Ricardo Henao | Lawrence Carin
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

In many natural language processing applications, identifying predictive text can be as important as the predictions themselves. When predicting medical diagnoses, for example, identifying predictive content in clinical notes not only enhances interpretability, but also allows unknown, descriptive (i.e., text-based) risk factors to be identified. We here formalize this problem as predictive extraction and address it using a simple mechanism based on linear attention. Our method preserves differentiability, allowing scalable inference via stochastic gradient descent. Further, the model decomposes predictions into a sum of contributions of distinct text spans. Importantly, we require only document labels, not ground-truth spans. Results show that our model identifies semantically-cohesive spans and assigns them scores that agree with human ratings, while preserving classification performance.

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Unsupervised Paraphrasing Consistency Training for Low Resource Named Entity Recognition
Rui Wang | Ricardo Henao
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Unsupervised consistency training is a way of semi-supervised learning that encourages consistency in model predictions between the original and augmented data. For Named Entity Recognition (NER), existing approaches augment the input sequence with token replacement, assuming annotations on the replaced positions unchanged. In this paper, we explore the use of paraphrasing as a more principled data augmentation scheme for NER unsupervised consistency training. Specifically, we convert Conditional Random Field (CRF) into a multi-label classification module and encourage consistency on the entity appearance between the original and paraphrased sequences. Experiments show that our method is especially effective when annotations are limited.

2020

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Integrating Task Specific Information into Pretrained Language Models for Low Resource Fine Tuning
Rui Wang | Shijing Si | Guoyin Wang | Lei Zhang | Lawrence Carin | Ricardo Henao
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2020

Pretrained Language Models (PLMs) have improved the performance of natural language understanding in recent years. Such models are pretrained on large corpora, which encode the general prior knowledge of natural languages but are agnostic to information characteristic of downstream tasks. This often results in overfitting when fine-tuned with low resource datasets where task-specific information is limited. In this paper, we integrate label information as a task-specific prior into the self-attention component of pretrained BERT models. Experiments on several benchmarks and real-word datasets suggest that the proposed approach can largely improve the performance of pretrained models when fine-tuning with small datasets.

2018

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Improved Semantic-Aware Network Embedding with Fine-Grained Word Alignment
Dinghan Shen | Xinyuan Zhang | Ricardo Henao | Lawrence Carin
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Network embeddings, which learns low-dimensional representations for each vertex in a large-scale network, have received considerable attention in recent years. For a wide range of applications, vertices in a network are typically accompanied by rich textual information such as user profiles, paper abstracts, etc. In this paper, we propose to incorporate semantic features into network embeddings by matching important words between text sequences for all pairs of vertices. We introduce an word-by-word alignment framework that measures the compatibility of embeddings between word pairs, and then adaptively accumulates these alignment features with a simple yet effective aggregation function. In experiments, we evaluate the proposed framework on three real-world benchmarks for downstream tasks, including link prediction and multi-label vertex classification. The experimental results demonstrate that our model outperforms state-of-the-art network embedding methods by a large margin.

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Baseline Needs More Love: On Simple Word-Embedding-Based Models and Associated Pooling Mechanisms
Dinghan Shen | Guoyin Wang | Wenlin Wang | Martin Renqiang Min | Qinliang Su | Yizhe Zhang | Chunyuan Li | Ricardo Henao | Lawrence Carin
Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Many deep learning architectures have been proposed to model the compositionality in text sequences, requiring substantial number of parameters and expensive computations. However, there has not been a rigorous evaluation regarding the added value of sophisticated compositional functions. In this paper, we conduct a point-by-point comparative study between Simple Word-Embedding-based Models (SWEMs), consisting of parameter-free pooling operations, relative to word-embedding-based RNN/CNN models. Surprisingly, SWEMs exhibit comparable or even superior performance in the majority of cases considered. Based upon this understanding, we propose two additional pooling strategies over learned word embeddings: (i) a max-pooling operation for improved interpretability; and (ii) a hierarchical pooling operation, which preserves spatial (n-gram) information within text sequences. We present experiments on 17 datasets encompassing three tasks: (i) (long) document classification; (ii) text sequence matching; and (iii) short text tasks, including classification and tagging.

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NASH: Toward End-to-End Neural Architecture for Generative Semantic Hashing
Dinghan Shen | Qinliang Su | Paidamoyo Chapfuwa | Wenlin Wang | Guoyin Wang | Ricardo Henao | Lawrence Carin
Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Semantic hashing has become a powerful paradigm for fast similarity search in many information retrieval systems. While fairly successful, previous techniques generally require two-stage training, and the binary constraints are handled ad-hoc. In this paper, we present an end-to-end Neural Architecture for Semantic Hashing (NASH), where the binary hashing codes are treated as Bernoulli latent variables. A neural variational inference framework is proposed for training, where gradients are directly backpropagated through the discrete latent variable to optimize the hash function. We also draw the connections between proposed method and rate-distortion theory, which provides a theoretical foundation for the effectiveness of our framework. Experimental results on three public datasets demonstrate that our method significantly outperforms several state-of-the-art models on both unsupervised and supervised scenarios.

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Joint Embedding of Words and Labels for Text Classification
Guoyin Wang | Chunyuan Li | Wenlin Wang | Yizhe Zhang | Dinghan Shen | Xinyuan Zhang | Ricardo Henao | Lawrence Carin
Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Word embeddings are effective intermediate representations for capturing semantic regularities between words, when learning the representations of text sequences. We propose to view text classification as a label-word joint embedding problem: each label is embedded in the same space with the word vectors. We introduce an attention framework that measures the compatibility of embeddings between text sequences and labels. The attention is learned on a training set of labeled samples to ensure that, given a text sequence, the relevant words are weighted higher than the irrelevant ones. Our method maintains the interpretability of word embeddings, and enjoys a built-in ability to leverage alternative sources of information, in addition to input text sequences. Extensive results on the several large text datasets show that the proposed framework outperforms the state-of-the-art methods by a large margin, in terms of both accuracy and speed.

2017

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Learning Generic Sentence Representations Using Convolutional Neural Networks
Zhe Gan | Yunchen Pu | Ricardo Henao | Chunyuan Li | Xiaodong He | Lawrence Carin
Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

We propose a new encoder-decoder approach to learn distributed sentence representations that are applicable to multiple purposes. The model is learned by using a convolutional neural network as an encoder to map an input sentence into a continuous vector, and using a long short-term memory recurrent neural network as a decoder. Several tasks are considered, including sentence reconstruction and future sentence prediction. Further, a hierarchical encoder-decoder model is proposed to encode a sentence to predict multiple future sentences. By training our models on a large collection of novels, we obtain a highly generic convolutional sentence encoder that performs well in practice. Experimental results on several benchmark datasets, and across a broad range of applications, demonstrate the superiority of the proposed model over competing methods.