Roma Patel


2021

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Game-theoretic Vocabulary Selection via the Shapley Value and Banzhaf Index
Roma Patel | Marta Garnelo | Ian Gemp | Chris Dyer | Yoram Bachrach
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

The input vocabulary and the representations learned are crucial to the performance of neural NLP models. Using the full vocabulary results in less explainable and more memory intensive models, with the embedding layer often constituting the majority of model parameters. It is thus common to use a smaller vocabulary to lower memory requirements and construct more interpertable models. We propose a vocabulary selection method that views words as members of a team trying to maximize the model’s performance. We apply power indices from cooperative game theory, including the Shapley value and Banzhaf index, that measure the relative importance of individual team members in accomplishing a joint task. We approximately compute these indices to identify the most influential words. Our empirical evaluation examines multiple NLP tasks, including sentence and document classification, question answering and textual entailment. We compare to baselines that select words based on frequency, TF-IDF and regression coefficients under L1 regularization, and show that this game-theoretic vocabulary selection outperforms all baseline on a range of different tasks and datasets.

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Recognizing Multimodal Entailment
Cesar Ilharco | Afsaneh Shirazi | Arjun Gopalan | Arsha Nagrani | Blaz Bratanic | Chris Bregler | Christina Funk | Felipe Ferreira | Gabriel Barcik | Gabriel Ilharco | Georg Osang | Jannis Bulian | Jared Frank | Lucas Smaira | Qin Cao | Ricardo Marino | Roma Patel | Thomas Leung | Vaiva Imbrasaite
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing: Tutorial Abstracts

How information is created, shared and consumed has changed rapidly in recent decades, in part thanks to new social platforms and technologies on the web. With ever-larger amounts of unstructured and limited labels, organizing and reconciling information from different sources and modalities is a central challenge in machine learning. This cutting-edge tutorial aims to introduce the multimodal entailment task, which can be useful for detecting semantic alignments when a single modality alone does not suffice for a whole content understanding. Starting with a brief overview of natural language processing, computer vision, structured data and neural graph learning, we lay the foundations for the multimodal sections to follow. We then discuss recent multimodal learning literature covering visual, audio and language streams, and explore case studies focusing on tasks which require fine-grained understanding of visual and linguistic semantics question answering, veracity and hatred classification. Finally, we introduce a new dataset for recognizing multimodal entailment, exploring it in a hands-on collaborative section. Overall, this tutorial gives an overview of multimodal learning, introduces a multimodal entailment dataset, and encourages future research in the topic.

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“Was it “stated” or was it “claimed”?: How linguistic bias affects generative language models
Roma Patel | Ellie Pavlick
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

People use language in subtle and nuanced ways to convey their beliefs. For instance, saying claimed instead of said casts doubt on the truthfulness of the underlying proposition, thus representing the author’s opinion on the matter. Several works have identified such linguistic classes of words that occur frequently in natural language text and are bias-inducing by virtue of their framing effects. In this paper, we test whether generative language models (including GPT-2 (CITATION) are sensitive to these linguistic framing effects. In particular, we test whether prompts that contain linguistic markers of author bias (e.g., hedges, implicatives, subjective intensifiers, assertives) influence the distribution of the generated text. Although these framing effects are subtle and stylistic, we find evidence that they lead to measurable style and topic differences in the generated text, leading to language that is, on average, more polarised and more skewed towards controversial entities and events.

2020

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Room-Across-Room: Multilingual Vision-and-Language Navigation with Dense Spatiotemporal Grounding
Alexander Ku | Peter Anderson | Roma Patel | Eugene Ie | Jason Baldridge
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

We introduce Room-Across-Room (RxR), a new Vision-and-Language Navigation (VLN) dataset. RxR is multilingual (English, Hindi, and Telugu) and larger (more paths and instructions) than other VLN datasets. It emphasizes the role of language in VLN by addressing known biases in paths and eliciting more references to visible entities. Furthermore, each word in an instruction is time-aligned to the virtual poses of instruction creators and validators. We establish baseline scores for monolingual and multilingual settings and multitask learning when including Room-to-Room annotations (Anderson et al., 2018). We also provide results for a model that learns from synchronized pose traces by focusing only on portions of the panorama attended to in human demonstrations. The size, scope and detail of RxR dramatically expands the frontier for research on embodied language agents in photorealistic simulated environments.

2019

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Probing What Different NLP Tasks Teach Machines about Function Word Comprehension
Najoung Kim | Roma Patel | Adam Poliak | Patrick Xia | Alex Wang | Tom McCoy | Ian Tenney | Alexis Ross | Tal Linzen | Benjamin Van Durme | Samuel R. Bowman | Ellie Pavlick
Proceedings of the Eighth Joint Conference on Lexical and Computational Semantics (*SEM 2019)

We introduce a set of nine challenge tasks that test for the understanding of function words. These tasks are created by structurally mutating sentences from existing datasets to target the comprehension of specific types of function words (e.g., prepositions, wh-words). Using these probing tasks, we explore the effects of various pretraining objectives for sentence encoders (e.g., language modeling, CCG supertagging and natural language inference (NLI)) on the learned representations. Our results show that pretraining on CCG—our most syntactic objective—performs the best on average across our probing tasks, suggesting that syntactic knowledge helps function word comprehension. Language modeling also shows strong performance, supporting its widespread use for pretraining state-of-the-art NLP models. Overall, no pretraining objective dominates across the board, and our function word probing tasks highlight several intuitive differences between pretraining objectives, e.g., that NLI helps the comprehension of negation.

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Can You Tell Me How to Get Past Sesame Street? Sentence-Level Pretraining Beyond Language Modeling
Alex Wang | Jan Hula | Patrick Xia | Raghavendra Pappagari | R. Thomas McCoy | Roma Patel | Najoung Kim | Ian Tenney | Yinghui Huang | Katherin Yu | Shuning Jin | Berlin Chen | Benjamin Van Durme | Edouard Grave | Ellie Pavlick | Samuel R. Bowman
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Natural language understanding has recently seen a surge of progress with the use of sentence encoders like ELMo (Peters et al., 2018a) and BERT (Devlin et al., 2019) which are pretrained on variants of language modeling. We conduct the first large-scale systematic study of candidate pretraining tasks, comparing 19 different tasks both as alternatives and complements to language modeling. Our primary results support the use language modeling, especially when combined with pretraining on additional labeled-data tasks. However, our results are mixed across pretraining tasks and show some concerning trends: In ELMo’s pretrain-then-freeze paradigm, random baselines are worryingly strong and results vary strikingly across target tasks. In addition, fine-tuning BERT on an intermediate task often negatively impacts downstream transfer. In a more positive trend, we see modest gains from multitask training, suggesting the development of more sophisticated multitask and transfer learning techniques as an avenue for further research.

2018

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Syntactic Patterns Improve Information Extraction for Medical Search
Roma Patel | Yinfei Yang | Iain Marshall | Ani Nenkova | Byron Wallace
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 2 (Short Papers)

Medical professionals search the published literature by specifying the type of patients, the medical intervention(s) and the outcome measure(s) of interest. In this paper we demonstrate how features encoding syntactic patterns improve the performance of state-of-the-art sequence tagging models (both neural and linear) for information extraction of these medically relevant categories. We present an analysis of the type of patterns exploited and of the semantic space induced for these, i.e., the distributed representations learned for identified multi-token patterns. We show that these learned representations differ substantially from those of the constituent unigrams, suggesting that the patterns capture contextual information that is otherwise lost.

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A Corpus with Multi-Level Annotations of Patients, Interventions and Outcomes to Support Language Processing for Medical Literature
Benjamin Nye | Junyi Jessy Li | Roma Patel | Yinfei Yang | Iain Marshall | Ani Nenkova | Byron Wallace
Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

We present a corpus of 5,000 richly annotated abstracts of medical articles describing clinical randomized controlled trials. Annotations include demarcations of text spans that describe the Patient population enrolled, the Interventions studied and to what they were Compared, and the Outcomes measured (the ‘PICO’ elements). These spans are further annotated at a more granular level, e.g., individual interventions within them are marked and mapped onto a structured medical vocabulary. We acquired annotations from a diverse set of workers with varying levels of expertise and cost. We describe our data collection process and the corpus itself in detail. We then outline a set of challenging NLP tasks that would aid searching of the medical literature and the practice of evidence-based medicine.