Ron Artstein


2020

pdf bib
Dialogue-AMR: Abstract Meaning Representation for Dialogue
Claire Bonial | Lucia Donatelli | Mitchell Abrams | Stephanie M. Lukin | Stephen Tratz | Matthew Marge | Ron Artstein | David Traum | Clare Voss
Proceedings of the 12th Language Resources and Evaluation Conference

This paper describes a schema that enriches Abstract Meaning Representation (AMR) in order to provide a semantic representation for facilitating Natural Language Understanding (NLU) in dialogue systems. AMR offers a valuable level of abstraction of the propositional content of an utterance; however, it does not capture the illocutionary force or speaker’s intended contribution in the broader dialogue context (e.g., make a request or ask a question), nor does it capture tense or aspect. We explore dialogue in the domain of human-robot interaction, where a conversational robot is engaged in search and navigation tasks with a human partner. To address the limitations of standard AMR, we develop an inventory of speech acts suitable for our domain, and present “Dialogue-AMR”, an enhanced AMR that represents not only the content of an utterance, but the illocutionary force behind it, as well as tense and aspect. To showcase the coverage of the schema, we use both manual and automatic methods to construct the “DialAMR” corpus—a corpus of human-robot dialogue annotated with standard AMR and our enriched Dialogue-AMR schema. Our automated methods can be used to incorporate AMR into a larger NLU pipeline supporting human-robot dialogue.

2019

pdf bib
Augmenting Abstract Meaning Representation for Human-Robot Dialogue
Claire Bonial | Lucia Donatelli | Stephanie M. Lukin | Stephen Tratz | Ron Artstein | David Traum | Clare Voss
Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Designing Meaning Representations

We detail refinements made to Abstract Meaning Representation (AMR) that make the representation more suitable for supporting a situated dialogue system, where a human remotely controls a robot for purposes of search and rescue and reconnaissance. We propose 36 augmented AMRs that capture speech acts, tense and aspect, and spatial information. This linguistic information is vital for representing important distinctions, for example whether the robot has moved, is moving, or will move. We evaluate two existing AMR parsers for their performance on dialogue data. We also outline a model for graph-to-graph conversion, in which output from AMR parsers is converted into our refined AMRs. The design scheme presented here, though task-specific, is extendable for broad coverage of speech acts using AMR in future task-independent work.

2018

pdf bib
Dialogue Structure Annotation for Multi-Floor Interaction
David Traum | Cassidy Henry | Stephanie Lukin | Ron Artstein | Felix Gervits | Kimberly Pollard | Claire Bonial | Su Lei | Clare Voss | Matthew Marge | Cory Hayes | Susan Hill
Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC 2018)

pdf bib
The Niki and Julie Corpus: Collaborative Multimodal Dialogues between Humans, Robots, and Virtual Agents
Ron Artstein | Jill Boberg | Alesia Gainer | Jonathan Gratch | Emmanuel Johnson | Anton Leuski | Gale Lucas | David Traum
Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC 2018)

pdf bib
Chahta Anumpa: A multimodal corpus of the Choctaw Language
Jacqueline Brixey | Eli Pincus | Ron Artstein
Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC 2018)

pdf bib
Edit me: A Corpus and a Framework for Understanding Natural Language Image Editing
Ramesh Manuvinakurike | Jacqueline Brixey | Trung Bui | Walter Chang | Doo Soon Kim | Ron Artstein | Kallirroi Georgila
Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC 2018)

pdf bib
DialEdit: Annotations for Spoken Conversational Image Editing
Ramesh Manuvirakurike | Jacqueline Brixey | Trung Bui | Walter Chang | Ron Artstein | Kallirroi Georgila
Proceedings 14th Joint ACL - ISO Workshop on Interoperable Semantic Annotation

pdf bib
Consequences and Factors of Stylistic Differences in Human-Robot Dialogue
Stephanie Lukin | Kimberly Pollard | Claire Bonial | Matthew Marge | Cassidy Henry | Ron Artstein | David Traum | Clare Voss
Proceedings of the 19th Annual SIGdial Meeting on Discourse and Dialogue

This paper identifies stylistic differences in instruction-giving observed in a corpus of human-robot dialogue. Differences in verbosity and structure (i.e., single-intent vs. multi-intent instructions) arose naturally without restrictions or prior guidance on how users should speak with the robot. Different styles were found to produce different rates of miscommunication, and correlations were found between style differences and individual user variation, trust, and interaction experience with the robot. Understanding potential consequences and factors that influence style can inform design of dialogue systems that are robust to natural variation from human users.

2017

pdf bib
Exploring Variation of Natural Human Commands to a Robot in a Collaborative Navigation Task
Matthew Marge | Claire Bonial | Ashley Foots | Cory Hayes | Cassidy Henry | Kimberly Pollard | Ron Artstein | Clare Voss | David Traum
Proceedings of the First Workshop on Language Grounding for Robotics

Robot-directed communication is variable, and may change based on human perception of robot capabilities. To collect training data for a dialogue system and to investigate possible communication changes over time, we developed a Wizard-of-Oz study that (a) simulates a robot’s limited understanding, and (b) collects dialogues where human participants build a progressively better mental model of the robot’s understanding. With ten participants, we collected ten hours of human-robot dialogue. We analyzed the structure of instructions that participants gave to a remote robot before it responded. Our findings show a general initial preference for including metric information (e.g., move forward 3 feet) over landmarks (e.g., move to the desk) in motion commands, but this decreased over time, suggesting changes in perception.

pdf bib
Lessons in Dialogue System Deployment
Anton Leuski | Ron Artstein
Proceedings of the 18th Annual SIGdial Meeting on Discourse and Dialogue

We analyze deployment of an interactive dialogue system in an environment where deep technical expertise might not be readily available. The initial version was created using a collection of research tools. We summarize a number of challenges with its deployment at two museums and describe a new system that simplifies the installation and user interface; reduces reliance on 3rd-party software; and provides a robust data collection mechanism.

pdf bib
SHIHbot: A Facebook chatbot for Sexual Health Information on HIV/AIDS
Jacqueline Brixey | Rens Hoegen | Wei Lan | Joshua Rusow | Karan Singla | Xusen Yin | Ron Artstein | Anton Leuski
Proceedings of the 18th Annual SIGdial Meeting on Discourse and Dialogue

We present the implementation of an autonomous chatbot, SHIHbot, deployed on Facebook, which answers a wide variety of sexual health questions on HIV/AIDS. The chatbot’s response database is com-piled from professional medical and public health resources in order to provide reliable information to users. The system’s backend is NPCEditor, a response selection platform trained on linked questions and answers; to our knowledge this is the first retrieval-based chatbot deployed on a large public social network.

2016

pdf bib
Proceedings of the 17th Annual Meeting of the Special Interest Group on Discourse and Dialogue
Raquel Fernandez | Wolfgang Minker | Giuseppe Carenini | Ryuichiro Higashinaka | Ron Artstein | Alesia Gainer
Proceedings of the 17th Annual Meeting of the Special Interest Group on Discourse and Dialogue

pdf bib
Language Portability for Dialogue Systems: Translating a Question-Answering System from English into Tamil
Satheesh Ravi | Ron Artstein
Proceedings of the 17th Annual Meeting of the Special Interest Group on Discourse and Dialogue

pdf bib
New Dimensions in Testimony Demonstration
Ron Artstein | Alesia Gainer | Kallirroi Georgila | Anton Leuski | Ari Shapiro | David Traum
Proceedings of the 2016 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Demonstrations

pdf bib
ARRAU: Linguistically-Motivated Annotation of Anaphoric Descriptions
Olga Uryupina | Ron Artstein | Antonella Bristot | Federica Cavicchio | Kepa Rodriguez | Massimo Poesio
Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'16)

This paper presents a second release of the ARRAU dataset: a multi-domain corpus with thorough linguistically motivated annotation of anaphora and related phenomena. Building upon the first release almost a decade ago, a considerable effort had been invested in improving the data both quantitatively and qualitatively. Thus, we have doubled the corpus size, expanded the selection of covered phenomena to include referentiality and genericity and designed and implemented a methodology for enforcing the consistency of the manual annotation. We believe that the new release of ARRAU provides a valuable material for ongoing research in complex cases of coreference as well as for a variety of related tasks. The corpus is publicly available through LDC.

pdf bib
The Negochat Corpus of Human-agent Negotiation Dialogues
Vasily Konovalov | Ron Artstein | Oren Melamud | Ido Dagan
Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'16)

Annotated in-domain corpora are crucial to the successful development of dialogue systems of automated agents, and in particular for developing natural language understanding (NLU) components of such systems. Unfortunately, such important resources are scarce. In this work, we introduce an annotated natural language human-agent dialogue corpus in the negotiation domain. The corpus was collected using Amazon Mechanical Turk following the ‘Wizard-Of-Oz’ approach, where a ‘wizard’ human translates the participants’ natural language utterances in real time into a semantic language. Once dialogue collection was completed, utterances were annotated with intent labels by two independent annotators, achieving high inter-annotator agreement. Our initial experiments with an SVM classifier show that automatically inferring such labels from the utterances is far from trivial. We make our corpus publicly available to serve as an aid in the development of dialogue systems for negotiation agents, and suggest that analogous corpora can be created following our methodology and using our available source code. To the best of our knowledge this is the first publicly available negotiation dialogue corpus.

2015

pdf bib
Evaluating Spoken Dialogue Processing for Time-Offset Interaction
David Traum | Kallirroi Georgila | Ron Artstein | Anton Leuski
Proceedings of the 16th Annual Meeting of the Special Interest Group on Discourse and Dialogue

2014

pdf bib
A Demonstration of Dialogue Processing in SimSensei Kiosk
Fabrizio Morbini | David DeVault | Kallirroi Georgila | Ron Artstein | David Traum | Louis-Philippe Morency
Proceedings of the 15th Annual Meeting of the Special Interest Group on Discourse and Dialogue (SIGDIAL)

pdf bib
The Distress Analysis Interview Corpus of human and computer interviews
Jonathan Gratch | Ron Artstein | Gale Lucas | Giota Stratou | Stefan Scherer | Angela Nazarian | Rachel Wood | Jill Boberg | David DeVault | Stacy Marsella | David Traum | Skip Rizzo | Louis-Philippe Morency
Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'14)

The Distress Analysis Interview Corpus (DAIC) contains clinical interviews designed to support the diagnosis of psychological distress conditions such as anxiety, depression, and post traumatic stress disorder. The interviews are conducted by humans, human controlled agents and autonomous agents, and the participants include both distressed and non-distressed individuals. Data collected include audio and video recordings and extensive questionnaire responses; parts of the corpus have been transcribed and annotated for a variety of verbal and non-verbal features. The corpus has been used to support the creation of an automated interviewer agent, and for research on the automatic identification of psychological distress.

2013

pdf bib
Verbal indicators of psychological distress in interactive dialogue with a virtual human
David DeVault | Kallirroi Georgila | Ron Artstein | Fabrizio Morbini | David Traum | Stefan Scherer | Albert Skip Rizzo | Louis-Philippe Morency
Proceedings of the SIGDIAL 2013 Conference

pdf bib
Which ASR should I choose for my dialogue system?
Fabrizio Morbini | Kartik Audhkhasi | Kenji Sagae | Ron Artstein | Doğan Can | Panayiotis Georgiou | Shri Narayanan | Anton Leuski | David Traum
Proceedings of the SIGDIAL 2013 Conference

2012

pdf bib
The Twins Corpus of Museum Visitor Questions
Priti Aggarwal | Ron Artstein | Jillian Gerten | Athanasios Katsamanis | Shrikanth Narayanan | Angela Nazarian | David Traum
Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'12)

The Twins corpus is a collection of utterances spoken in interactions with two virtual characters who serve as guides at the Museum of Science in Boston. The corpus contains about 200,000 spoken utterances from museum visitors (primarily children) as well as from trained handlers who work at the museum. In addition to speech recordings, the corpus contains the outputs of speech recognition performed at the time of utterance as well as the system interpretation of the utterances. Parts of the corpus have been manually transcribed and annotated for question interpretation. The corpus has been used for improving performance of the museum characters and for a variety of research projects, such as phonetic-based Natural Language Understanding, creation of conversational characters from text resources, dialogue policy learning, and research on patterns of user interaction. It has the potential to be used for research on children's speech and on language used when talking to a virtual human.

2011

pdf bib
An Annotation Scheme for Cross-Cultural Argumentation and Persuasion Dialogues
Kallirroi Georgila | Ron Artstein | Angela Nazarian | Michael Rushforth | David Traum | Katia Sycara
Proceedings of the SIGDIAL 2011 Conference

pdf bib
Error Return Plots
Ron Artstein
Proceedings of the SIGDIAL 2011 Conference

2010

pdf bib
Don’t tell anyone! Two Experiments on Gossip Conversations
Jenny Brusk | Ron Artstein | David Traum
Proceedings of the SIGDIAL 2010 Conference

pdf bib
Practical Evaluation of Speech Recognizers for Virtual Human Dialogue Systems
Xuchen Yao | Pravin Bhutada | Kallirroi Georgila | Kenji Sagae | Ron Artstein | David Traum
Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'10)

We perform a large-scale evaluation of multiple off-the-shelf speech recognizers across diverse domains for virtual human dialogue systems. Our evaluation is aimed at speech recognition consumers and potential consumers with limited experience with readily available recognizers. We focus on practical factors to determine what levels of performance can be expected from different available recognizers in various projects featuring different types of conversational utterances. Our results show that there is no single recognizer that outperforms all other recognizers in all domains. The performance of each recognizer may vary significantly depending on the domain, the size and perplexity of the corpus, the out-of-vocabulary rate, and whether acoustic and language model adaptation has been used or not. We expect that our evaluation will prove useful to other speech recognition consumers, especially in the dialogue community, and will shed some light on the key problem in spoken dialogue systems of selecting the most suitable available speech recognition system for a particular application, and what impact training will have.

2008

pdf bib
Survey Article: Inter-Coder Agreement for Computational Linguistics
Ron Artstein | Massimo Poesio
Computational Linguistics, Volume 34, Number 4, December 2008

pdf bib
Anaphoric Annotation in the ARRAU Corpus
Massimo Poesio | Ron Artstein
Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'08)

Arrau is a new corpus annotated for anaphoric relations, with information about agreement and explicit representation of multiple antecedents for ambiguous anaphoric expressions and discourse antecedents for expressions which refer to abstract entities such as events, actions and plans. The corpus contains texts from different genres: task-oriented dialogues from the Trains-91 and Trains-93 corpus, narratives from the English Pear Stories corpus, newspaper articles from the Wall Street Journal portion of the Penn Treebank, and mixed text from the Gnome corpus.

pdf bib
Making Grammar-Based Generation Easier to Deploy in Dialogue Systems
David DeVault | David Traum | Ron Artstein
Proceedings of the 9th SIGdial Workshop on Discourse and Dialogue

pdf bib
Practical Grammar-Based NLG from Examples
David DeVault | David Traum | Ron Artstein
Proceedings of the Fifth International Natural Language Generation Conference

pdf bib
Coling 2008: Proceedings of the workshop on Human Judgements in Computational Linguistics
Ron Artstein | Gemma Boleda | Frank Keller | Sabine Schulte im Walde
Coling 2008: Proceedings of the workshop on Human Judgements in Computational Linguistics

2005

pdf bib
The Reliability of Anaphoric Annotation, Reconsidered: Taking Ambiguity into Account
Massimo Poesio | Ron Artstein
Proceedings of the Workshop on Frontiers in Corpus Annotations II: Pie in the Sky