Sagnik Mukherjee


2022

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On the Robustness of Reading Comprehension Models to Entity Renaming
Jun Yan | Yang Xiao | Sagnik Mukherjee | Bill Yuchen Lin | Robin Jia | Xiang Ren
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

We study the robustness of machine reading comprehension (MRC) models to entity renaming—do models make more wrong predictions when the same questions are asked about an entity whose name has been changed? Such failures imply that models overly rely on entity information to answer questions, and thus may generalize poorly when facts about the world change or questions are asked about novel entities. To systematically audit this issue, we present a pipeline to automatically generate test examples at scale, by replacing entity names in the original test sample with names from a variety of sources, ranging from names in the same test set, to common names in life, to arbitrary strings. Across five datasets and three pretrained model architectures, MRC models consistently perform worse when entities are renamed, with particularly large accuracy drops on datasets constructed via distant supervision. We also find large differences between models: SpanBERT, which is pretrained with span-level masking, is more robust than RoBERTa, despite having similar accuracy on unperturbed test data. We further experiment with different masking strategies as the continual pretraining objective and find that entity-based masking can improve the robustness of MRC models.

2021

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AUTOSUMM: Automatic Model Creation for Text Summarization
Sharmila Reddy Nangi | Atharv Tyagi | Jay Mundra | Sagnik Mukherjee | Raj Snehal | Niyati Chhaya | Aparna Garimella
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Recent efforts to develop deep learning models for text generation tasks such as extractive and abstractive summarization have resulted in state-of-the-art performances on various datasets. However, obtaining the best model configuration for a given dataset requires an extensive knowledge of deep learning specifics like model architecture, tuning parameters etc., and is often extremely challenging for a non-expert. In this paper, we propose methods to automatically create deep learning models for the tasks of extractive and abstractive text summarization. Based on the recent advances in Automated Machine Learning and the success of large language models such as BERT and GPT-2 in encoding knowledge, we use a combination of Neural Architecture Search (NAS) and Knowledge Distillation (KD) techniques to perform model search and compression using the vast knowledge provided by these language models to develop smaller, customized models for any given dataset. We present extensive empirical results to illustrate the effectiveness of our model creation methods in terms of inference time and model size, while achieving near state-of-the-art performances in terms of accuracy across a range of datasets.

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WASSA@IITK at WASSA 2021: Multi-task Learning and Transformer Finetuning for Emotion Classification and Empathy Prediction
Jay Mundra | Rohan Gupta | Sagnik Mukherjee
Proceedings of the Eleventh Workshop on Computational Approaches to Subjectivity, Sentiment and Social Media Analysis

This paper describes our contribution to the WASSA 2021 shared task on Empathy Prediction and Emotion Classification. The broad goal of this task was to model an empathy score, a distress score and the overall level of emotion of an essay written in response to a newspaper article associated with harm to someone. We have used the ELECTRA model abundantly and also advanced deep learning approaches like multi-task learning. Additionally, we also leveraged standard machine learning techniques like ensembling. Our system achieves a Pearson Correlation Coefficient of 0.533 on sub-task I and a macro F1 score of 0.5528 on sub-task II. We ranked 1st in Emotion Classification sub-task and 3rd in Empathy Prediction sub-task.

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IITK@LCP at SemEval-2021 Task 1: Classification for Lexical Complexity Regression Task
Neil Shirude | Sagnik Mukherjee | Tushar Shandhilya | Ananta Mukherjee | Ashutosh Modi
Proceedings of the 15th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation (SemEval-2021)

This paper describes our contribution to SemEval 2021 Task 1 (Shardlow et al., 2021): Lexical Complexity Prediction. In our approach, we leverage the ELECTRA model and attempt to mirror the data annotation scheme. Although the task is a regression task, we show that we can treat it as an aggregation of several classification and regression models. This somewhat counter-intuitive approach achieved an MAE score of 0.0654 for Sub-Task 1 and MAE of 0.0811 on Sub-Task 2. Additionally, we used the concept of weak supervision signals from Gloss-BERT in our work, and it significantly improved the MAE score in Sub-Task 1.