Shirley Anugrah Hayati


2020

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INSPIRED: Toward Sociable Recommendation Dialog Systems
Shirley Anugrah Hayati | Dongyeop Kang | Qingxiaoyang Zhu | Weiyan Shi | Zhou Yu
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

In recommendation dialogs, humans commonly disclose their preference and make recommendations in a friendly manner. However, this is a challenge when developing a sociable recommendation dialog system, due to the lack of dialog dataset annotated with such sociable strategies. Therefore, we present INSPIRED, a new dataset of 1,001 human-human dialogs for movie recommendation with measures for successful recommendations. To better understand how humans make recommendations in communication, we design an annotation scheme related to recommendation strategies based on social science theories and annotate these dialogs. Our analysis shows that sociable recommendation strategies, such as sharing personal opinions or communicating with encouragement, more frequently lead to successful recommendations. Based on our dataset, we train end-to-end recommendation dialog systems with and without our strategy labels. In both automatic and human evaluation, our model with strategy incorporation outperforms the baseline model. This work is a first step for building sociable recommendation dialog systems with a basis of social science theories.

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A Summary of the First Workshop on Language Technology for Language Documentation and Revitalization
Graham Neubig | Shruti Rijhwani | Alexis Palmer | Jordan MacKenzie | Hilaria Cruz | Xinjian Li | Matthew Lee | Aditi Chaudhary | Luke Gessler | Steven Abney | Shirley Anugrah Hayati | Antonios Anastasopoulos | Olga Zamaraeva | Emily Prud’hommeaux | Jennette Child | Sara Child | Rebecca Knowles | Sarah Moeller | Jeffrey Micher | Yiyuan Li | Sydney Zink | Mengzhou Xia | Roshan S Sharma | Patrick Littell
Proceedings of the 1st Joint Workshop on Spoken Language Technologies for Under-resourced languages (SLTU) and Collaboration and Computing for Under-Resourced Languages (CCURL)

Despite recent advances in natural language processing and other language technology, the application of such technology to language documentation and conservation has been limited. In August 2019, a workshop was held at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, USA to attempt to bring together language community members, documentary linguists, and technologists to discuss how to bridge this gap and create prototypes of novel and practical language revitalization technologies. The workshop focused on developing technologies to aid language documentation and revitalization in four areas: 1) spoken language (speech transcription, phone to orthography decoding, text-to-speech and text-speech forced alignment), 2) dictionary extraction and management, 3) search tools for corpora, and 4) social media (language learning bots and social media analysis). This paper reports the results of this workshop, including issues discussed, and various conceived and implemented technologies for nine languages: Arapaho, Cayuga, Inuktitut, Irish Gaelic, Kidaw’ida, Kwak’wala, Ojibwe, San Juan Quiahije Chatino, and Seneca.

2019

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What A Sunny Day ☔: Toward Emoji-Sensitive Irony Detection
Shirley Anugrah Hayati | Aditi Chaudhary | Naoki Otani | Alan W Black
Proceedings of the 5th Workshop on Noisy User-generated Text (W-NUT 2019)

Irony detection is an important task with applications in identification of online abuse and harassment. With the ubiquitous use of non-verbal cues such as emojis in social media, in this work we aim to study the role of these structures in irony detection. Since the existing irony detection datasets have <10% ironic tweets with emoji, classifiers trained on them are insensitive to emojis. We propose an automated pipeline for creating a more balanced dataset.

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Analyzing Incorporation of Emotion in Emoji Prediction
Shirley Anugrah Hayati | Aldrian Obaja Muis
Proceedings of the Tenth Workshop on Computational Approaches to Subjectivity, Sentiment and Social Media Analysis

In this work, we investigate the impact of incorporating emotion classes on the task of predicting emojis from Twitter texts. More specifically, we first show that there is a correlation between the emotion expressed in the text and the emoji choice of Twitter users. Based on this insight we propose a few simple methods to incorporate emotion information in traditional classifiers. Through automatic metrics, human evaluation, and error analysis, we show that the improvement obtained by incorporating emotion is significant and correlate better with human preferences compared to the baseline models. Through the human ratings that we obtained, we also argue for preference metric to better evaluate the usefulness of an emoji prediction system.

2018

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Retrieval-Based Neural Code Generation
Shirley Anugrah Hayati | Raphael Olivier | Pravalika Avvaru | Pengcheng Yin | Anthony Tomasic | Graham Neubig
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

In models to generate program source code from natural language, representing this code in a tree structure has been a common approach. However, existing methods often fail to generate complex code correctly due to a lack of ability to memorize large and complex structures. We introduce RECODE, a method based on subtree retrieval that makes it possible to explicitly reference existing code examples within a neural code generation model. First, we retrieve sentences that are similar to input sentences using a dynamic-programming-based sentence similarity scoring method. Next, we extract n-grams of action sequences that build the associated abstract syntax tree. Finally, we increase the probability of actions that cause the retrieved n-gram action subtree to be in the predicted code. We show that our approach improves the performance on two code generation tasks by up to +2.6 BLEU.