Shoval Sadde


2022

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Large Scale Substitution-based Word Sense Induction
Matan Eyal | Shoval Sadde | Hillel Taub-Tabib | Yoav Goldberg
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

We present a word-sense induction method based on pre-trained masked language models (MLMs), which can cheaply scale to large vocabularies and large corpora. The result is a corpus which is sense-tagged according to a corpus-derived sense inventory and where each sense is associated with indicative words. Evaluation on English Wikipedia that was sense-tagged using our method shows that both the induced senses, and the per-instance sense assignment, are of high quality even compared to WSD methods, such as Babelfy. Furthermore, by training a static word embeddings algorithm on the sense-tagged corpus, we obtain high-quality static senseful embeddings. These outperform existing senseful embeddings methods on the WiC dataset and on a new outlier detection dataset we developed. The data driven nature of the algorithm allows to induce corpora-specific senses, which may not appear in standard sense inventories, as we demonstrate using a case study on the scientific domain.

2021

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The Possible, the Plausible, and the Desirable: Event-Based Modality Detection for Language Processing
Valentina Pyatkin | Shoval Sadde | Aynat Rubinstein | Paul Portner | Reut Tsarfaty
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Modality is the linguistic ability to describe vents with added information such as how desirable, plausible, or feasible they are. Modality is important for many NLP downstream tasks such as the detection of hedging, uncertainty, speculation, and more. Previous studies that address modality detection in NLP often restrict modal expressions to a closed syntactic class, and the modal sense labels are vastly different across different studies, lacking an accepted standard. Furthermore, these senses are often analyzed independently of the events that they modify. This work builds on the theoretical foundations of the Georgetown Gradable Modal Expressions (GME) work by Rubinstein et al. (2013) to propose an event-based modality detection task where modal expressions can be words of any syntactic class and sense labels are drawn from a comprehensive taxonomy which harmonizes the modal concepts contributed by the different studies. We present experiments on the GME corpus aiming to detect and classify fine-grained modal concepts and associate them with their modified events. We show that detecting and classifying modal expressions is not only feasible, it also improves the detection of modal events in their own right.

2020

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Syntactic Search by Example
Micah Shlain | Hillel Taub-Tabib | Shoval Sadde | Yoav Goldberg
Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: System Demonstrations

We present a system that allows a user to search a large linguistically annotated corpus using syntactic patterns over dependency graphs. In contrast to previous attempts to this effect, we introduce a light-weight query language that does not require the user to know the details of the underlying syntactic representations, and instead to query the corpus by providing an example sentence coupled with simple markup. Search is performed at an interactive speed due to efficient linguistic graph-indexing and retrieval engine. This allows for rapid exploration, development and refinement of syntax-based queries. We demonstrate the system using queries over two corpora: the English wikipedia, and a collection of English pubmed abstracts. A demo of the wikipedia system is available at https://allenai.github.io/spike/ .

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Interactive Extractive Search over Biomedical Corpora
Hillel Taub Tabib | Micah Shlain | Shoval Sadde | Dan Lahav | Matan Eyal | Yaara Cohen | Yoav Goldberg
Proceedings of the 19th SIGBioMed Workshop on Biomedical Language Processing

We present a system that allows life-science researchers to search a linguistically annotated corpus of scientific texts using patterns over dependency graphs, as well as using patterns over token sequences and a powerful variant of boolean keyword queries. In contrast to previous attempts to dependency-based search, we introduce a light-weight query language that does not require the user to know the details of the underlying linguistic representations, and instead to query the corpus by providing an example sentence coupled with simple markup. Search is performed at an interactive speed due to efficient linguistic graph-indexing and retrieval engine. This allows for rapid exploration, development and refinement of user queries. We demonstrate the system using example workflows over two corpora: the PubMed corpus including 14,446,243 PubMed abstracts and the CORD-19 dataset, a collection of over 45,000 research papers focused on COVID-19 research. The system is publicly available at https://allenai.github.io/spike

2019

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What’s Wrong with Hebrew NLP? And How to Make it Right
Reut Tsarfaty | Shoval Sadde | Stav Klein | Amit Seker
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing and the 9th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (EMNLP-IJCNLP): System Demonstrations

For languages with simple morphology such as English, automatic annotation pipelines such as spaCy or Stanford’s CoreNLP successfully serve projects in academia and the industry. For many morphologically-rich languages (MRLs), similar pipelines show sub-optimal performance that limits their applicability for text analysis in research and the industry. The sub-optimal performance is mainly due to errors in early morphological disambiguation decisions, that cannot be recovered later on in the pipeline, yielding incoherent annotations on the whole. This paper describes the design and use of the ONLP suite, a joint morpho-syntactic infrastructure for processing Modern Hebrew texts. The joint inference over morphology and syntax substantially limits error propagation, and leads to high accuracy. ONLP provides rich and expressive annotations which already serve diverse academic and commercial needs. Its accompanying demo further serves educational activities, introducing Hebrew NLP intricacies to researchers and non-researchers alike.