Shuohang Wang


2023

pdf bib
APOLLO: A Simple Approach for Adaptive Pretraining of Language Models for Logical Reasoning
Soumya Sanyal | Yichong Xu | Shuohang Wang | Ziyi Yang | Reid Pryzant | Wenhao Yu | Chenguang Zhu | Xiang Ren
Proceedings of the 61st Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Logical reasoning over text is an important ability that requires understanding the semantics of the text and reasoning through them to arrive at correct inferences. Prior works on pretraining language models to improve the logical reasoning ability require complex processing of training data (e.g., aligning symbolic knowledge to text), yielding task-specific data augmentation that is not easy to adapt to any general text corpus. In this work, we propose APOLLO, a simple adaptive pretraining approach to improve the logical reasoning skills of language models. We select a subset of Wikipedia for adaptive pretraining using a set of logical inference keywords as filter words. Further, we propose two self-supervised loss functions for training. First, we modify the masked language modeling loss only to mask specific parts-of-speech words that likely require higher-order reasoning to predict them. Second, we propose a sentence-level classification loss that teaches the model to distinguish between entailment and contradiction types of sentences. The proposed pretraining paradigm is both simple and independent of task formats. We demonstrate the effectiveness of APOLLO by comparing it with prior baselines on two logical reasoning datasets. APOLLO performs comparably on ReClor and outperforms baselines on LogiQA.

2022

pdf bib
Training Data is More Valuable than You Think: A Simple and Effective Method by Retrieving from Training Data
Shuohang Wang | Yichong Xu | Yuwei Fang | Yang Liu | Siqi Sun | Ruochen Xu | Chenguang Zhu | Michael Zeng
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Retrieval-based methods have been shown to be effective in NLP tasks via introducing external knowledge. However, the indexing and retrieving of large-scale corpora bring considerable computational cost. Surprisingly, we found that REtrieving from the traINing datA (REINA) only can lead to significant gains on multiple NLG and NLU tasks. We retrieve the labeled training instances most similar to the input text and then concatenate them with the input to feed into the model to generate the output. Experimental results show that this simple method can achieve significantly better performance on a variety of NLU and NLG tasks, including summarization, machine translation, language modeling, and question answering tasks. For instance, our proposed method achieved state-of-the-art results on XSum, BigPatent, and CommonsenseQA. Our code is released, https://github.com/microsoft/REINA .

pdf bib
KG-FiD: Infusing Knowledge Graph in Fusion-in-Decoder for Open-Domain Question Answering
Donghan Yu | Chenguang Zhu | Yuwei Fang | Wenhao Yu | Shuohang Wang | Yichong Xu | Xiang Ren | Yiming Yang | Michael Zeng
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Current Open-Domain Question Answering (ODQA) models typically include a retrieving module and a reading module, where the retriever selects potentially relevant passages from open-source documents for a given question, and the reader produces an answer based on the retrieved passages. The recently proposed Fusion-in-Decoder (FiD) framework is a representative example, which is built on top of a dense passage retriever and a generative reader, achieving the state-of-the-art performance. In this paper we further improve the FiD approach by introducing a knowledge-enhanced version, namely KG-FiD. Our new model uses a knowledge graph to establish the structural relationship among the retrieved passages, and a graph neural network (GNN) to re-rank the passages and select only a top few for further processing. Our experiments on common ODQA benchmark datasets (Natural Questions and TriviaQA) demonstrate that KG-FiD can achieve comparable or better performance in answer prediction than FiD, with less than 40% of the computation cost.

pdf bib
Dict-BERT: Enhancing Language Model Pre-training with Dictionary
Wenhao Yu | Chenguang Zhu | Yuwei Fang | Donghan Yu | Shuohang Wang | Yichong Xu | Michael Zeng | Meng Jiang
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL 2022

Pre-trained language models (PLMs) aim to learn universal language representations by conducting self-supervised training tasks on large-scale corpora. Since PLMs capture word semantics in different contexts, the quality of word representations highly depends on word frequency, which usually follows a heavy-tailed distributions in the pre-training corpus. Therefore, the embeddings of rare words on the tail are usually poorly optimized. In this work, we focus on enhancing language model pre-training by leveraging definitions of the rare words in dictionaries (e.g., Wiktionary). To incorporate a rare word definition as a part of input, we fetch its definition from the dictionary and append it to the end of the input text sequence. In addition to training with the masked language modeling objective, we propose two novel self-supervised pre-training tasks on word and sentence-level alignment between input text sequence and rare word definitions to enhance language modeling representation with dictionary. We evaluate the proposed Dict-BERT model on the language understanding benchmark GLUE and eight specialized domain benchmark datasets. Extensive experiments demonstrate that Dict-BERT can significantly improve the understanding of rare words and boost model performance on various NLP downstream tasks.

pdf bib
Leveraging Knowledge in Multilingual Commonsense Reasoning
Yuwei Fang | Shuohang Wang | Yichong Xu | Ruochen Xu | Siqi Sun | Chenguang Zhu | Michael Zeng
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL 2022

Commonsense reasoning (CSR) requires models to be equipped with general world knowledge. While CSR is a language-agnostic process, most comprehensive knowledge sources are restricted to a small number of languages, especially English. Thus, it remains unclear how to effectively conduct multilingual commonsense reasoning (XCSR) for various languages. In this work, we propose to use English as a pivot language, utilizing English knowledge sources for our our commonsense reasoning framework via a translate-retrieve-translate (TRT) strategy. For multilingual commonsense questions and answer candidates, we collect related knowledge via translation and retrieval from the knowledge in the source language. The retrieved knowledge is then translated into the target language and integrated into a pre-trained multilingual language model via visible knowledge attention. Then we utilize a diverse of four English knowledge sources to provide more comprehensive coverage of knowledge in different formats. Extensive results on the XCSR benchmark demonstrate that TRT with external knowledge can significantly improve multilingual commonsense reasoning in both zero-shot and translate-train settings, consistently outperforming the state-of-the-art by more than 3% on the multilingual commonsense reasoning benchmark X-CSQA and X-CODAH.

pdf bib
Task Compass: Scaling Multi-task Pre-training with Task Prefix
Zhuosheng Zhang | Shuohang Wang | Yichong Xu | Yuwei Fang | Wenhao Yu | Yang Liu | Hai Zhao | Chenguang Zhu | Michael Zeng
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2022

Leveraging task-aware annotated data as supervised signals to assist with self-supervised learning on large-scale unlabeled data has become a new trend in pre-training language models. Existing studies show that multi-task learning with large-scale supervised tasks suffers from negative effects across tasks. To tackle the challenge, we propose a task prefix guided multi-task pre-training framework to explore the relationships among tasks. We conduct extensive experiments on 40 datasets, which show that our model can not only serve as the strong foundation backbone for a wide range of tasks but also be feasible as a probing tool for analyzing task relationships. The task relationships reflected by the prefixes align transfer learning performance between tasks. They also suggest directions for data augmentation with complementary tasks, which help our model achieve human-parity results on commonsense reasoning leaderboards. Code is available at https://github.com/cooelf/CompassMTL.

pdf bib
AdaPrompt: Adaptive Model Training for Prompt-based NLP
Yulong Chen | Yang Liu | Li Dong | Shuohang Wang | Chenguang Zhu | Michael Zeng | Yue Zhang
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2022

Prompt-based learning, with its capability to tackle zero-shot and few-shot NLP tasks, has gained much attention in the community. The main idea is to bridge the gap between NLP downstream tasks and language modeling (LM), by mapping these tasks into natural language prompts, which are then filled by pre-trained language models (PLMs).However, for prompt learning, there are still two salient gaps between NLP tasks and pretraining. First, prompt information is not necessarily sufficiently present during LM pre-training. Second, task-specific data are not necessarily well represented during pre-training. We address these two issues by proposing AdaPrompt, adaptively retrieving external data for continual pretraining of PLMs by making use of both task and prompt characteristics. In addition, we make use of knowledge in Natural Language Inference models for deriving adaptive verbalizers.Experimental results on five NLP benchmarks show that AdaPrompt can improve over standard PLMs in few-shot settings. In addition, in zero-shot settings, our method outperforms standard prompt-based methods by up to 26.35% relative error reduction.

pdf bib
Retrieval Augmentation for Commonsense Reasoning: A Unified Approach
Wenhao Yu | Chenguang Zhu | Zhihan Zhang | Shuohang Wang | Zhuosheng Zhang | Yuwei Fang | Meng Jiang
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

A common thread of retrieval-augmented methods in the existing literature focuses on retrieving encyclopedic knowledge, such as Wikipedia, which facilitates well-defined entity and relation spaces that can be modeled. However, applying such methods to commonsense reasoning tasks faces two unique challenges, i.e., the lack of a general large-scale corpus for retrieval and a corresponding effective commonsense retriever. In this paper, we systematically investigate how to leverage commonsense knowledge retrieval to improve commonsense reasoning tasks. We proposed a unified framework of retrieval-augmented commonsense reasoning (called RACo), including a newly constructed commonsense corpus with over 20 million documents and novel strategies for training a commonsense retriever. We conducted experiments on four different commonsense reasoning tasks. Extensive evaluation results showed that our proposed RACo can significantly outperform other knowledge-enhanced method counterparts, achieving new SoTA performance on the CommonGen and CREAK leaderboards.

pdf bib
ParaTag: A Dataset of Paraphrase Tagging for Fine-Grained Labels, NLG Evaluation, and Data Augmentation
Shuohang Wang | Ruochen Xu | Yang Liu | Chenguang Zhu | Michael Zeng
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Paraphrase identification has been formulated as a binary classification task to decide whether two sentences hold a paraphrase relationship. Existing paraphrase datasets only annotate a binary label for each sentence pair. However, after a systematical analysis of existing paraphrase datasets, we found that the degree of paraphrase cannot be well characterized by a single binary label. And the criteria of paraphrase are not even consistent within the same dataset. We hypothesize that such issues would limit the effectiveness of paraphrase models trained on these data. To this end, we propose a novel fine-grained paraphrase annotation schema that labels the minimum spans of tokens in a sentence that don’t have the corresponding paraphrases in the other sentence. Under this setting, we frame paraphrasing as a sequence tagging task. We collect 30k sentence pairs in English with the new annotation schema, resulting in the ParaTag dataset. In addition to reporting baseline results on ParaTag using state-of-art language models, we show that ParaTag is especially useful for training an automatic scorer for language generation evaluation. Finally, we train a paraphrase generation model from ParaTag and achieve better data augmentation performance on the GLUE benchmark than other public paraphrasing datasets.

pdf bib
Empowering Language Models with Knowledge Graph Reasoning for Open-Domain Question Answering
Ziniu Hu | Yichong Xu | Wenhao Yu | Shuohang Wang | Ziyi Yang | Chenguang Zhu | Kai-Wei Chang | Yizhou Sun
Proceedings of the 2022 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Answering open-domain questions requires world knowledge about in-context entities. As pre-trained Language Models (LMs) lack the power to store all required knowledge, external knowledge sources, such as knowledge graphs, are often used to augment LMs. In this work, we propose knOwledge REasOning empowered Language Model(OREO-LM), which consists of a novel Knowledge Interaction Layer that can be flexibly plugged into existing Transformer-based LMs to interact with a differentiable Knowledge Graph Reasoning module collaboratively. In this way, LM guides KG to walk towards the desired answer, while the retrieved knowledge improves LM.By adopting OREO-LM to RoBERTa and T5, we show significant performance gain, achieving state-of-art results in the Closed-Book setting. The performance enhancement is mainly from the KG reasoning’s capacity to infer missing relational facts. In addition, OREO-LM provides reasoning paths as rationales to interpret the model’s decision.

2021

pdf bib
Cluster-Former: Clustering-based Sparse Transformer for Question Answering
Shuohang Wang | Luowei Zhou | Zhe Gan | Yen-Chun Chen | Yuwei Fang | Siqi Sun | Yu Cheng | Jingjing Liu
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL-IJCNLP 2021

pdf bib
NOAHQA: Numerical Reasoning with Interpretable Graph Question Answering Dataset
Qiyuan Zhang | Lei Wang | Sicheng Yu | Shuohang Wang | Yang Wang | Jing Jiang | Ee-Peng Lim
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2021

While diverse question answering (QA) datasets have been proposed and contributed significantly to the development of deep learning models for QA tasks, the existing datasets fall short in two aspects. First, we lack QA datasets covering complex questions that involve answers as well as the reasoning processes to get them. As a result, the state-of-the-art QA research on numerical reasoning still focuses on simple calculations and does not provide the mathematical expressions or evidence justifying the answers. Second, the QA community has contributed a lot of effort to improve the interpretability of QA models. However, they fail to explicitly show the reasoning process, such as the evidence order for reasoning and the interactions between different pieces of evidence. To address the above shortcoming, we introduce NOAHQA, a conversational and bilingual QA dataset with questions requiring numerical reasoning with compound mathematical expressions. With NOAHQA, we develop an interpretable reasoning graph as well as the appropriate evaluation metric to measure the answer quality. We evaluate the state-of-the-art QA models trained using existing QA datasets on NOAHQA and show that the best among them can only achieve 55.5 exact match scores, while the human performance is 89.7. We also present a new QA model for generating a reasoning graph where the reasoning graph metric still has a large gap compared with that of humans, eg, 28 scores.

pdf bib
Want To Reduce Labeling Cost? GPT-3 Can Help
Shuohang Wang | Yang Liu | Yichong Xu | Chenguang Zhu | Michael Zeng
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2021

Data annotation is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process for many NLP tasks. Although there exist various methods to produce pseudo data labels, they are often task-specific and require a decent amount of labeled data to start with. Recently, the immense language model GPT-3 with 170 billion parameters has achieved tremendous improvement across many few-shot learning tasks. In this paper, we explore ways to leverage GPT-3 as a low-cost data labeler to train other models. We find that to make the downstream model achieve the same performance on a variety of NLU and NLG tasks, it costs 50% to 96% less to use labels from GPT-3 than using labels from humans. Furthermore, we propose a novel framework of combining pseudo labels from GPT-3 with human labels, which leads to even better performance. These results present a cost-effective data labeling methodology that is generalizable to many practical applications.

pdf bib
EarlyBERT: Efficient BERT Training via Early-bird Lottery Tickets
Xiaohan Chen | Yu Cheng | Shuohang Wang | Zhe Gan | Zhangyang Wang | Jingjing Liu
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Heavily overparameterized language models such as BERT, XLNet and T5 have achieved impressive success in many NLP tasks. However, their high model complexity requires enormous computation resources and extremely long training time for both pre-training and fine-tuning. Many works have studied model compression on large NLP models, but only focusing on reducing inference time while still requiring an expensive training process. Other works use extremely large batch sizes to shorten the pre-training time, at the expense of higher computational resource demands. In this paper, inspired by the Early-Bird Lottery Tickets recently studied for computer vision tasks, we propose EarlyBERT, a general computationally-efficient training algorithm applicable to both pre-training and fine-tuning of large-scale language models. By slimming the self-attention and fully-connected sub-layers inside a transformer, we are the first to identify structured winning tickets in the early stage of BERT training. We apply those tickets towards efficient BERT training, and conduct comprehensive pre-training and fine-tuning experiments on GLUE and SQuAD downstream tasks. Our results show that EarlyBERT achieves comparable performance to standard BERT, with 35 45% less training time. Code is available at https://github.com/VITA-Group/EarlyBERT.

pdf bib
On Orthogonality Constraints for Transformers
Aston Zhang | Alvin Chan | Yi Tay | Jie Fu | Shuohang Wang | Shuai Zhang | Huajie Shao | Shuochao Yao | Roy Ka-Wei Lee
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 2: Short Papers)

Orthogonality constraints encourage matrices to be orthogonal for numerical stability. These plug-and-play constraints, which can be conveniently incorporated into model training, have been studied for popular architectures in natural language processing, such as convolutional neural networks and recurrent neural networks. However, a dedicated study on such constraints for transformers has been absent. To fill this gap, this paper studies orthogonality constraints for transformers, showing the effectiveness with empirical evidence from ten machine translation tasks and two dialogue generation tasks. For example, on the large-scale WMT’16 En→De benchmark, simply plugging-and-playing orthogonality constraints on the original transformer model (Vaswani et al., 2017) increases the BLEU from 28.4 to 29.6, coming close to the 29.7 BLEU achieved by the very competitive dynamic convolution (Wu et al., 2019).

pdf bib
LightningDOT: Pre-training Visual-Semantic Embeddings for Real-Time Image-Text Retrieval
Siqi Sun | Yen-Chun Chen | Linjie Li | Shuohang Wang | Yuwei Fang | Jingjing Liu
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

Multimodal pre-training has propelled great advancement in vision-and-language research. These large-scale pre-trained models, although successful, fatefully suffer from slow inference speed due to enormous computational cost mainly from cross-modal attention in Transformer architecture. When applied to real-life applications, such latency and computation demand severely deter the practical use of pre-trained models. In this paper, we study Image-text retrieval (ITR), the most mature scenario of V+L application, which has been widely studied even prior to the emergence of recent pre-trained models. We propose a simple yet highly effective approach, LightningDOT that accelerates the inference time of ITR by thousands of times, without sacrificing accuracy. LightningDOT removes the time-consuming cross-modal attention by extracting pre-cached feature indexes offline, and employing instant dot-product matching online, which significantly speeds up retrieval process. In fact, our LightningDOT achieves superior performance across mainstream ITR benchmarks such as Flickr30k and COCO datasets, outperforming existing pre-trained models that consume 1000 times magnitude of computational hours using the same features.

2020

pdf bib
Cross-Thought for Sentence Encoder Pre-training
Shuohang Wang | Yuwei Fang | Siqi Sun | Zhe Gan | Yu Cheng | Jingjing Liu | Jing Jiang
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

In this paper, we propose Cross-Thought, a novel approach to pre-training sequence encoder, which is instrumental in building reusable sequence embeddings for large-scale NLP tasks such as question answering. Instead of using the original signals of full sentences, we train a Transformer-based sequence encoder over a large set of short sequences, which allows the model to automatically select the most useful information for predicting masked words. Experiments on question answering and textual entailment tasks demonstrate that our pre-trained encoder can outperform state-of-the-art encoders trained with continuous sentence signals as well as traditional masked language modeling baselines. Our proposed approach also achieves new state of the art on HotpotQA (full-wiki setting) by improving intermediate information retrieval performance.

pdf bib
Contrastive Distillation on Intermediate Representations for Language Model Compression
Siqi Sun | Zhe Gan | Yuwei Fang | Yu Cheng | Shuohang Wang | Jingjing Liu
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

Existing language model compression methods mostly use a simple L_2 loss to distill knowledge in the intermediate representations of a large BERT model to a smaller one. Although widely used, this objective by design assumes that all the dimensions of hidden representations are independent, failing to capture important structural knowledge in the intermediate layers of the teacher network. To achieve better distillation efficacy, we propose Contrastive Distillation on Intermediate Representations (CoDIR), a principled knowledge distillation framework where the student is trained to distill knowledge through intermediate layers of the teacher via a contrastive objective. By learning to distinguish positive sample from a large set of negative samples, CoDIR facilitates the student’s exploitation of rich information in teacher’s hidden layers. CoDIR can be readily applied to compress large-scale language models in both pre-training and finetuning stages, and achieves superb performance on the GLUE benchmark, outperforming state-of-the-art compression methods.

pdf bib
T3: Tree-Autoencoder Constrained Adversarial Text Generation for Targeted Attack
Boxin Wang | Hengzhi Pei | Boyuan Pan | Qian Chen | Shuohang Wang | Bo Li
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

Adversarial attacks against natural language processing systems, which perform seemingly innocuous modifications to inputs, can induce arbitrary mistakes to the target models. Though raised great concerns, such adversarial attacks can be leveraged to estimate the robustness of NLP models. Compared with the adversarial example generation in continuous data domain (e.g., image), generating adversarial text that preserves the original meaning is challenging since the text space is discrete and non-differentiable. To handle these challenges, we propose a target-controllable adversarial attack framework T3, which is applicable to a range of NLP tasks. In particular, we propose a tree-based autoencoder to embed the discrete text data into a continuous representation space, upon which we optimize the adversarial perturbation. A novel tree-based decoder is then applied to regularize the syntactic correctness of the generated text and manipulate it on either sentence (T3(Sent)) or word (T3(Word)) level. We consider two most representative NLP tasks: sentiment analysis and question answering (QA). Extensive experimental results and human studies show that T3 generated adversarial texts can successfully manipulate the NLP models to output the targeted incorrect answer without misleading the human. Moreover, we show that the generated adversarial texts have high transferability which enables the black-box attacks in practice. Our work sheds light on an effective and general way to examine the robustness of NLP models. Our code is publicly available at https://github.com/AI-secure/T3/.

pdf bib
Hierarchical Graph Network for Multi-hop Question Answering
Yuwei Fang | Siqi Sun | Zhe Gan | Rohit Pillai | Shuohang Wang | Jingjing Liu
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

In this paper, we present Hierarchical Graph Network (HGN) for multi-hop question answering. To aggregate clues from scattered texts across multiple paragraphs, a hierarchical graph is created by constructing nodes on different levels of granularity (questions, paragraphs, sentences, entities), the representations of which are initialized with pre-trained contextual encoders. Given this hierarchical graph, the initial node representations are updated through graph propagation, and multi-hop reasoning is performed via traversing through the graph edges for each subsequent sub-task (e.g., paragraph selection, supporting facts extraction, answer prediction). By weaving heterogeneous nodes into an integral unified graph, this hierarchical differentiation of node granularity enables HGN to support different question answering sub-tasks simultaneously. Experiments on the HotpotQA benchmark demonstrate that the proposed model achieves new state of the art, outperforming existing multi-hop QA approaches.

pdf bib
Multi-Fact Correction in Abstractive Text Summarization
Yue Dong | Shuohang Wang | Zhe Gan | Yu Cheng | Jackie Chi Kit Cheung | Jingjing Liu
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

Pre-trained neural abstractive summarization systems have dominated extractive strategies on news summarization performance, at least in terms of ROUGE. However, system-generated abstractive summaries often face the pitfall of factual inconsistency: generating incorrect facts with respect to the source text. To address this challenge, we propose Span-Fact, a suite of two factual correction models that leverages knowledge learned from question answering models to make corrections in system-generated summaries via span selection. Our models employ single or multi-masking strategies to either iteratively or auto-regressively replace entities in order to ensure semantic consistency w.r.t. the source text, while retaining the syntactic structure of summaries generated by abstractive summarization models. Experiments show that our models significantly boost the factual consistency of system-generated summaries without sacrificing summary quality in terms of both automatic metrics and human evaluation.

2019

pdf bib
Lightweight and Efficient Neural Natural Language Processing with Quaternion Networks
Yi Tay | Aston Zhang | Anh Tuan Luu | Jinfeng Rao | Shuai Zhang | Shuohang Wang | Jie Fu | Siu Cheung Hui
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Many state-of-the-art neural models for NLP are heavily parameterized and thus memory inefficient. This paper proposes a series of lightweight and memory efficient neural architectures for a potpourri of natural language processing (NLP) tasks. To this end, our models exploit computation using Quaternion algebra and hypercomplex spaces, enabling not only expressive inter-component interactions but also significantly (75%) reduced parameter size due to lesser degrees of freedom in the Hamilton product. We propose Quaternion variants of models, giving rise to new architectures such as the Quaternion attention Model and Quaternion Transformer. Extensive experiments on a battery of NLP tasks demonstrates the utility of proposed Quaternion-inspired models, enabling up to 75% reduction in parameter size without significant loss in performance.

pdf bib
Simple and Effective Curriculum Pointer-Generator Networks for Reading Comprehension over Long Narratives
Yi Tay | Shuohang Wang | Anh Tuan Luu | Jie Fu | Minh C. Phan | Xingdi Yuan | Jinfeng Rao | Siu Cheung Hui | Aston Zhang
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

This paper tackles the problem of reading comprehension over long narratives where documents easily span over thousands of tokens. We propose a curriculum learning (CL) based Pointer-Generator framework for reading/sampling over large documents, enabling diverse training of the neural model based on the notion of alternating contextual difficulty. This can be interpreted as a form of domain randomization and/or generative pretraining during training. To this end, the usage of the Pointer-Generator softens the requirement of having the answer within the context, enabling us to construct diverse training samples for learning. Additionally, we propose a new Introspective Alignment Layer (IAL), which reasons over decomposed alignments using block-based self-attention. We evaluate our proposed method on the NarrativeQA reading comprehension benchmark, achieving state-of-the-art performance, improving existing baselines by 51% relative improvement on BLEU-4 and 17% relative improvement on Rouge-L. Extensive ablations confirm the effectiveness of our proposed IAL and CL components.

pdf bib
Unsupervised Deep Structured Semantic Models for Commonsense Reasoning
Shuohang Wang | Sheng Zhang | Yelong Shen | Xiaodong Liu | Jingjing Liu | Jianfeng Gao | Jing Jiang
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 1 (Long and Short Papers)

Commonsense reasoning is fundamental to natural language understanding. While traditional methods rely heavily on human-crafted features and knowledge bases, we explore learning commonsense knowledge from a large amount of raw text via unsupervised learning. We propose two neural network models based on the Deep Structured Semantic Models (DSSM) framework to tackle two classic commonsense reasoning tasks, Winograd Schema challenges (WSC) and Pronoun Disambiguation (PDP). Evaluation shows that the proposed models effectively capture contextual information in the sentence and co-reference information between pronouns and nouns, and achieve significant improvement over previous state-of-the-art approaches.

2018

pdf bib
A Co-Matching Model for Multi-choice Reading Comprehension
Shuohang Wang | Mo Yu | Jing Jiang | Shiyu Chang
Proceedings of the 56th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 2: Short Papers)

Multi-choice reading comprehension is a challenging task, which involves the matching between a passage and a question-answer pair. This paper proposes a new co-matching approach to this problem, which jointly models whether a passage can match both a question and a candidate answer. Experimental results on the RACE dataset demonstrate that our approach achieves state-of-the-art performance.

2016

pdf bib
Learning Natural Language Inference with LSTM
Shuohang Wang | Jing Jiang
Proceedings of the 2016 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies