Sumanth Doddapaneni


2023

pdf bib
Naamapadam: A Large-Scale Named Entity Annotated Data for Indic Languages
Arnav Mhaske | Harshit Kedia | Sumanth Doddapaneni | Mitesh M. Khapra | Pratyush Kumar | Rudra Murthy | Anoop Kunchukuttan
Proceedings of the 61st Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

We present, Naamapadam, the largest publicly available Named Entity Recognition (NER) dataset for the 11 major Indian languages from two language families. The dataset contains more than 400k sentences annotated with a total of at least 100k entities from three standard entity categories (Person, Location, and, Organization) for 9 out of the 11 languages. The training dataset has been automatically created from the Samanantar parallel corpus by projecting automatically tagged entities from an English sentence to the corresponding Indian language translation. We also create manually annotated testsets for 9 languages. We demonstrate the utility of the obtained dataset on the Naamapadam-test dataset. We also release IndicNER, a multilingual IndicBERT model fine-tuned on Naamapadam training set. IndicNER achieves an F1 score of more than 80 for 7 out of 9 test languages. The dataset and models are available under open-source licences at https://ai4bharat.iitm.ac.in/naamapadam.

pdf bib
Towards Leaving No Indic Language Behind: Building Monolingual Corpora, Benchmark and Models for Indic Languages
Sumanth Doddapaneni | Rahul Aralikatte | Gowtham Ramesh | Shreya Goyal | Mitesh M. Khapra | Anoop Kunchukuttan | Pratyush Kumar
Proceedings of the 61st Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Building Natural Language Understanding (NLU) capabilities for Indic languages, which have a collective speaker base of more than one billion speakers is absolutely crucial. In this work, we aim to improve the NLU capabilities of Indic languages by making contributions along 3 important axes (i) monolingual corpora (ii) NLU testsets (iii) multilingual LLMs focusing on Indic languages. Specifically, we curate the largest monolingual corpora, IndicCorp, with 20.9B tokens covering 24 languages from 4 language families - a 2.3x increase over prior work, while supporting 12 additional languages. Next, we create a human-supervised benchmark, IndicXTREME, consisting of nine diverse NLU tasks covering 20 languages. Across languages and tasks, IndicXTREME contains a total of 105 evaluation sets, of which 52 are new contributions to the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort towards creating a standard benchmark for Indic languages that aims to test the multilingual zero-shot capabilities of pretrained language models. Finally, we train IndicBERT v2, a state-of-the-art model supporting all the languages. Averaged across languages and tasks, the model achieves an absolute improvement of 2 points over a strong baseline. The data and models are available at https://github.com/AI4Bharat/IndicBERT.

pdf bib
Varta: A Large-Scale Headline-Generation Dataset for Indic Languages
Rahul Aralikatte | Ziling Cheng | Sumanth Doddapaneni | Jackie Chi Kit Cheung
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL 2023

We present Varta, a large-scale multilingual dataset for headline generation in Indic languages. This dataset includes more than 41 million pairs of headlines and articles in 14 different Indic languages (and English), which come from a variety of high-quality news sources. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest collection of curated news articles for Indic languages currently available. We use the collected data in a series of experiments to answer important questions related to Indic NLP and multilinguality research in general. We show that the dataset is challenging even for state-of-the-art abstractive models and that they perform only slightly better than extractive baselines. Owing to its size, we also show that the dataset can be used to pre-train strong language models that outperform competitive baselines in both NLU and NLG benchmarks.

2022

pdf bib
Samanantar: The Largest Publicly Available Parallel Corpora Collection for 11 Indic Languages
Gowtham Ramesh | Sumanth Doddapaneni | Aravinth Bheemaraj | Mayank Jobanputra | Raghavan AK | Ajitesh Sharma | Sujit Sahoo | Harshita Diddee | Mahalakshmi J | Divyanshu Kakwani | Navneet Kumar | Aswin Pradeep | Srihari Nagaraj | Kumar Deepak | Vivek Raghavan | Anoop Kunchukuttan | Pratyush Kumar | Mitesh Shantadevi Khapra
Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics, Volume 10

We present Samanantar, the largest publicly available parallel corpora collection for Indic languages. The collection contains a total of 49.7 million sentence pairs between English and 11 Indic languages (from two language families). Specifically, we compile 12.4 million sentence pairs from existing, publicly available parallel corpora, and additionally mine 37.4 million sentence pairs from the Web, resulting in a 4× increase. We mine the parallel sentences from the Web by combining many corpora, tools, and methods: (a) Web-crawled monolingual corpora, (b) document OCR for extracting sentences from scanned documents, (c) multilingual representation models for aligning sentences, and (d) approximate nearest neighbor search for searching in a large collection of sentences. Human evaluation of samples from the newly mined corpora validate the high quality of the parallel sentences across 11 languages. Further, we extract 83.4 million sentence pairs between all 55 Indic language pairs from the English-centric parallel corpus using English as the pivot language. We trained multilingual NMT models spanning all these languages on Samanantar which outperform existing models and baselines on publicly available benchmarks, such as FLORES, establishing the utility of Samanantar. Our data and models are available publicly at Samanantar and we hope they will help advance research in NMT and multilingual NLP for Indic languages.

2021

pdf bib
Bitions@DravidianLangTech-EACL2021: Ensemble of Multilingual Language Models with Pseudo Labeling for offence Detection in Dravidian Languages
Debapriya Tula | Prathyush Potluri | Shreyas Ms | Sumanth Doddapaneni | Pranjal Sahu | Rohan Sukumaran | Parth Patwa
Proceedings of the First Workshop on Speech and Language Technologies for Dravidian Languages

With the advent of social media, we have seen a proliferation of data and public discourse. Unfortunately, this includes offensive content as well. The problem is exacerbated due to the sheer number of languages spoken on these platforms and the multiple other modalities used for sharing offensive content (images, gifs, videos and more). In this paper, we propose a multilingual ensemble-based model that can identify offensive content targeted against an individual (or group) in low resource Dravidian language. Our model is able to handle code-mixed data as well as instances where the script used is mixed (for instance, Tamil and Latin). Our solution ranked number one for the Malayalam dataset and ranked 4th and 5th for Tamil and Kannada, respectively.