Takeshi Abekawa


2016

pdf bib
SideNoter: Scholarly Paper Browsing System based on PDF Restructuring and Text Annotation
Takeshi Abekawa | Akiko Aizawa
Proceedings of COLING 2016, the 26th International Conference on Computational Linguistics: System Demonstrations

In this paper, we discuss our ongoing efforts to construct a scientific paper browsing system that helps users to read and understand advanced technical content distributed in PDF. Since PDF is a format specifically designed for printing, layout and logical structures of documents are indistinguishably embedded in the file. It requires much effort to extract natural language text from PDF files, and reversely, display semantic annotations produced by NLP tools on the original page layout. In our browsing system, we tackle these issues caused by the gap between printable document and plain text. Our system provides ways to extract natural language sentences from PDF files together with their logical structures, and also to map arbitrary textual spans to their corresponding regions on page images. We setup a demonstration system using papers published in ACL anthology and demonstrate the enhanced search and refined recommendation functions which we plan to make widely available to NLP researchers.

2012

pdf bib
Framework of Automatic Text Summarization Using Reinforcement Learning
Seonggi Ryang | Takeshi Abekawa
Proceedings of the 2012 Joint Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing and Computational Natural Language Learning

2011

pdf bib
Using seed terms for crawling bilingual terminology lists on the Web
Takeshi Abekawa | Kyo Kageura
Proceedings of Translating and the Computer 33

2010

pdf bib
Helping Volunteer Translators, Fostering Language Resources
Masao Utiyama | Takeshi Abekawa | Eiichiro Sumita | Kyo Kageura
Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on The People’s Web Meets NLP: Collaboratively Constructed Semantic Resources

pdf bib
Community-based Construction of Draft and Final Translation Corpus Through a Translation Hosting Site Minna no Hon’yaku (MNH)
Takeshi Abekawa | Masao Utiyama | Eiichiro Sumita | Kyo Kageura
Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'10)

In this paper we report a way of constructing a translation corpus that contains not only source and target texts, but draft and final versions of target texts, through the translation hosting site Minna no Hon'yaku (MNH). We made MNH publicly available on April 2009. Since then, more than 1,000 users have registered and over 3,500 documents have been translated, as of February 2010, from English to Japanese and from Japanese to English. MNH provides an integrated translation-aid environment, QRedit, which enables translators to look up high-quality dictionaries and Wikipedia as well as to search Google seamlessly. As MNH keeps translation logs, a corpus consisting of source texts, draft translations in several versions, and final translations is constructed naturally through MNH. As of 7 February, 764 documents with multiple translation versions are accumulated, of which 110 are edited by more than one translators. This corpus can be used for self-learning by inexperienced translators on MNH, and potentially for improving machine translation.

2009

pdf bib
Minna no Hon’yaku: a website for hosting, archiving, and promoting translations
Masao Utiyama | Takeshi Abekawa | Eiichiro Sumita | Kyo Kageura
Proceedings of Translating and the Computer 31

pdf bib
Fast Decoding and Easy Implementation: Transliteration as Sequential Labeling
Eiji Aramaki | Takeshi Abekawa
Proceedings of the 2009 Named Entities Workshop: Shared Task on Transliteration (NEWS 2009)

pdf bib
Hosting Volunteer Translators
Masao Utiyama | Takeshi Abekawa | Eiichiro Sumita | Kyo Kageura
Proceedings of Machine Translation Summit XII: Posters

2008

pdf bib
Constructing a Corpus that Indicates Patterns of Modification between Draft and Final Translations by Human Translators
Takeshi Abekawa | Kyo Kageura
Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'08)

In human translation, translators first make draft translations and then modify and edit them. In the case of experienced translators, this process involves the use of wide-ranging expert knowledge, which has mostly remained implicit so far. Describing the difference between draft and final translations, therefore, should contribute to making this knowledge explicit. If we could clarify the expert knowledge of translators, hopefully in a computationally tractable way, we would be able to contribute to the automatic notification of awkward translations to assist inexperienced translators, improving the quality of MT output, etc. Against this backdrop, we have started constructing a corpus that indicates patterns of modification between draft and final translations made by human translators. This paper reports on our progress to date.

pdf bib
What Prompts Translators to Modify Draft Translations? An Analysis of Basic Modification Patterns for Use in the Automatic Notification of Awkwardly Translated Text
Takeshi Abekawa | Kyo Kageura
Proceedings of the Third International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing: Volume-I

2007

pdf bib
A Translation Aid System with a Stratified Lookup Interface
Takeshi Abekawa | Kyo Kageura
Proceedings of the 45th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics Companion Volume Proceedings of the Demo and Poster Sessions

pdf bib
Flexible automatic look-up of English idiom entries in dictionaries
Koichi Takeuchi | Takashi Kanehila | Kazuki Hilao | Takeshi Abekawa | Kyo Kageura
Proceedings of Machine Translation Summit XI: Papers

2006

pdf bib
Japanese Dependency Parsing Using Co-Occurrence Information and a Combination of Case Elements
Takeshi Abekawa | Manabu Okumura
Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computational Linguistics and 44th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

2005

pdf bib
Corpus-Based Analysis of Japanese Relative Clause Constructions
Takeshi Abekawa | Manabu Okumura
Second International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing: Full Papers