Tengyang Chen


2020

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Developing a How-to Tip Machine Comprehension Dataset and its Evaluation in Machine Comprehension by BERT
Tengyang Chen | Hongyu Li | Miho Kasamatsu | Takehito Utsuro | Yasuhide Kawada
Proceedings of the Third Workshop on Fact Extraction and VERification (FEVER)

In the field of factoid question answering (QA), it is known that the state-of-the-art technology has achieved an accuracy comparable to that of humans in a certain benchmark challenge. On the other hand, in the area of non-factoid QA, there is still a limited number of datasets for training QA models, i.e., machine comprehension models. Considering such a situation within the field of the non-factoid QA, this paper aims to develop a dataset for training Japanese how-to tip QA models. This paper applies one of the state-of-the-art machine comprehension models to the Japanese how-to tip QA dataset. The trained how-to tip QA model is also compared with a factoid QA model trained with a Japanese factoid QA dataset. Evaluation results revealed that the how-to tip machine comprehension performance was almost comparative with that of the factoid machine comprehension even with the training data size reduced to around 4% of the factoid machine comprehension. Thus, the how-to tip machine comprehension task requires much less training data compared with the factoid machine comprehension task.

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MRC Examples Answerable by BERT without a Question Are Less Effective in MRC Model Training
Hongyu Li | Tengyang Chen | Shuting Bai | Takehito Utsuro | Yasuhide Kawada
Proceedings of the 1st Conference of the Asia-Pacific Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 10th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing: Student Research Workshop

Models developed for Machine Reading Comprehension (MRC) are asked to predict an answer from a question and its related context. However, there exist cases that can be correctly answered by an MRC model using BERT, where only the context is provided without including the question. In this paper, these types of examples are referred to as “easy to answer”, while others are as “hard to answer”, i.e., unanswerable by an MRC model using BERT without being provided the question. Based on classifying examples as answerable or unanswerable by BERT without the given question, we propose a method based on BERT that splits the training examples from the MRC dataset SQuAD1.1 into those that are “easy to answer” or “hard to answer”. Experimental evaluation from a comparison of two models, one trained only with “easy to answer” examples and the other with “hard to answer” examples demonstrates that the latter outperforms the former.

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Automatic Annotation of Werewolf Game Corpus with Players Revealing Oneselves as Seer/Medium and Divination/Medium Results
Youchao Lin | Miho Kasamatsu | Tengyang Chen | Takuya Fujita | Huanjin Deng | Takehito Utsuro
Workshop on Games and Natural Language Processing

While playing the communication game “Are You a Werewolf”, a player always guesses other players’ roles through discussions, based on his own role and other players’ crucial utterances. The underlying goal of this paper is to construct an agent that can analyze the participating players’ utterances and play the werewolf game as if it is a human. For a step of this underlying goal, this paper studies how to accumulate werewolf game log data annotated with identification of players revealing oneselves as seer/medium, the acts of the divination and the medium and declaring the results of the divination and the medium. In this paper, we divide the whole task into four sub tasks and apply CNN/SVM classifiers to each sub task and evaluate their performance.