Thomas Graf


2022

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Trees probe deeper than strings: an argument from allomorphy
Hossep Dolatian | Shiori Ikawa | Thomas Graf
Proceedings of the 19th SIGMORPHON Workshop on Computational Research in Phonetics, Phonology, and Morphology

Linguists disagree on whether morphological representations should be strings or trees. We argue that tree-based views of morphology can provide new insights into morphological complexity even in cases where the posited tree structure closely matches the surface string. Our argument is based on a subregular case study of morphologically conditioned allomorphy, where the phonological form of some morpheme (the target) is conditioned by the presence of some other morpheme (the trigger) somewhere within the morphosyntactic context. The trigger and target can either be linearly adjacent or non-adjacent, and either the trigger precedes the target (inwardly sensitive) or the target precedes the trigger (outwardly sensitive). When formalized as string transductions, the only complexity difference is between local and non-local allomorphy. Over trees, on the other hand, we also see a complexity difference between inwardly sensitive and outwardly sensitive allomorphy. Just as unboundedness assumptions can sometimes tease apart patterns that are equally complex in the finitely bounded case, tree-based representations can reveal differences that disappear over strings.

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Typological Implications of Tier-Based Strictly Local Movement
Thomas Graf
Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics 2022

2021

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Recursive prosody is not finite-state
Hossep Dolatian | Aniello De Santo | Thomas Graf
Proceedings of the 18th SIGMORPHON Workshop on Computational Research in Phonetics, Phonology, and Morphology

This paper investigates bounds on the generative capacity of prosodic processes, by focusing on the complexity of recursive prosody in coordination contexts in English (Wagner, 2010). Although all phonological processes and most prosodic processes are computationally regular string languages, we show that recursive prosody is not. The output string language is instead parallel multiple context-free (Seki et al., 1991). We evaluate the complexity of the pattern over strings, and then move on to a characterization over trees that requires the expressivity of multi bottom-up tree transducers. In doing so, we provide a foundation for future mathematically grounded investigations of the syntax-prosody interface.

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Multiple Wh-Movement is not Special: The Subregular Complexity of Persistent Features in Minimalist Grammars
Thomas Graf | Kalina Kostyszyn
Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics 2021

2020

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Curbing Feature Coding: Strictly Local Feature Assignment
Thomas Graf
Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics 2020

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The Subregular Complexity of Syntactic Islands
Nazila Shafiei | Thomas Graf
Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics 2020

2019

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C-Command Dependencies as TSL String Constraints
Thomas Graf | Nazila Shafiei
Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics (SCiL) 2019

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Case assignment in TSL syntax: a case study
Mai Ha Vu | Nazila Shafiei | Thomas Graf
Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics (SCiL) 2019

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Sensing Tree Automata as a Model of Syntactic Dependencies
Thomas Graf | Aniello De Santo
Proceedings of the 16th Meeting on the Mathematics of Language

2018

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Grammar Size and Quantitative Restrictions on Movement
Thomas Graf
Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics (SCiL) 2018

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Sanskrit n-Retroflexion is Input-Output Tier-Based Strictly Local
Thomas Graf | Connor Mayer
Proceedings of the Fifteenth Workshop on Computational Research in Phonetics, Phonology, and Morphology

Sanskrit /n/-retroflexion is one of the most complex segmental processes in phonology. While it is still star-free, it does not fit in any of the subregular classes that are commonly entertained in the literature. We show that when construed as a phonotactic dependency, the process fits into a class we call input-output tier-based strictly local (IO-TSL), a natural extension of the familiar class TSL. IO-TSL increases the power of TSL’s tier projection function by making it an input-output strictly local transduction. Assuming that /n/-retroflexion represents the upper bound on the complexity of segmental phonology, this shows that all of segmental phonology can be captured by combining the intuitive notion of tiers with the independently motivated machinery of strictly local mappings.

2017

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Graph Transductions and Typological Gaps in Morphological Paradigms
Thomas Graf
Proceedings of the 15th Meeting on the Mathematics of Language

2016

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Morphotactics as Tier-Based Strictly Local Dependencies
Alëna Aksënova | Thomas Graf | Sedigheh Moradi
Proceedings of the 14th SIGMORPHON Workshop on Computational Research in Phonetics, Phonology, and Morphology

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An Alternate View on Strong Lexicalization in TAG
Aniello De Santo | Alëna Aksënova | Thomas Graf
Proceedings of the 12th International Workshop on Tree Adjoining Grammars and Related Formalisms (TAG+12)

2015

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A Refined Notion of Memory Usage for Minimalist Parsing
Thomas Graf | Brigitta Fodor | James Monette | Gianpaul Rachiele | Aunika Warren | Chong Zhang
Proceedings of the 14th Meeting on the Mathematics of Language (MoL 2015)

2014

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Evaluating Evaluation Metrics for Minimalist Parsing
Thomas Graf | Bradley Marcinek
Proceedings of the Fifth Workshop on Cognitive Modeling and Computational Linguistics

2012

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Tree Adjunction as Minimalist Lowering
Thomas Graf
Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Tree Adjoining Grammars and Related Formalisms (TAG+11)

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Is Syntactic Binding Rational?
Thomas Graf | Natasha Abner
Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Tree Adjoining Grammars and Related Formalisms (TAG+11)