Xin Zhang


2022

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Identifying Chinese Opinion Expressions with Extremely-Noisy Crowdsourcing Annotations
Xin Zhang | Guangwei Xu | Yueheng Sun | Meishan Zhang | Xiaobin Wang | Min Zhang
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Recent works of opinion expression identification (OEI) rely heavily on the quality and scale of the manually-constructed training corpus, which could be extremely difficult to satisfy. Crowdsourcing is one practical solution for this problem, aiming to create a large-scale but quality-unguaranteed corpus. In this work, we investigate Chinese OEI with extremely-noisy crowdsourcing annotations, constructing a dataset at a very low cost. Following Zhang el al. (2021), we train the annotator-adapter model by regarding all annotations as gold-standard in terms of crowd annotators, and test the model by using a synthetic expert, which is a mixture of all annotators. As this annotator-mixture for testing is never modeled explicitly in the training phase, we propose to generate synthetic training samples by a pertinent mixup strategy to make the training and testing highly consistent. The simulation experiments on our constructed dataset show that crowdsourcing is highly promising for OEI, and our proposed annotator-mixup can further enhance the crowdsourcing modeling.

2021

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Crowdsourcing Learning as Domain Adaptation: A Case Study on Named Entity Recognition
Xin Zhang | Guangwei Xu | Yueheng Sun | Meishan Zhang | Pengjun Xie
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Crowdsourcing is regarded as one prospective solution for effective supervised learning, aiming to build large-scale annotated training data by crowd workers. Previous studies focus on reducing the influences from the noises of the crowdsourced annotations for supervised models. We take a different point in this work, regarding all crowdsourced annotations as gold-standard with respect to the individual annotators. In this way, we find that crowdsourcing could be highly similar to domain adaptation, and then the recent advances of cross-domain methods can be almost directly applied to crowdsourcing. Here we take named entity recognition (NER) as a study case, suggesting an annotator-aware representation learning model that inspired by the domain adaptation methods which attempt to capture effective domain-aware features. We investigate both unsupervised and supervised crowdsourcing learning, assuming that no or only small-scale expert annotations are available. Experimental results on a benchmark crowdsourced NER dataset show that our method is highly effective, leading to a new state-of-the-art performance. In addition, under the supervised setting, we can achieve impressive performance gains with only a very small scale of expert annotations.

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Sociolectal Analysis of Pretrained Language Models
Sheng Zhang | Xin Zhang | Weiming Zhang | Anders Søgaard
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Using data from English cloze tests, in which subjects also self-reported their gender, age, education, and race, we examine performance differences of pretrained language models across demographic groups, defined by these (protected) attributes. We demonstrate wide performance gaps across demographic groups and show that pretrained language models systematically disfavor young non-white male speakers; i.e., not only do pretrained language models learn social biases (stereotypical associations) – pretrained language models also learn sociolectal biases, learning to speak more like some than like others. We show, however, that, with the exception of BERT models, larger pretrained language models reduce some the performance gaps between majority and minority groups.

2017

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FuRongWang at SemEval-2017 Task 3: Deep Neural Networks for Selecting Relevant Answers in Community Question Answering
Sheng Zhang | Jiajun Cheng | Hui Wang | Xin Zhang | Pei Li | Zhaoyun Ding
Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation (SemEval-2017)

We describes deep neural networks frameworks in this paper to address the community question answering (cQA) ranking task (SemEval-2017 task 3). Convolutional neural networks and bi-directional long-short term memory networks are applied in our methods to extract semantic information from questions and answers (comments). In addition, in order to take the full advantage of question-comment semantic relevance, we deploy interaction layer and augmented features before calculating the similarity. The results show that our methods have the great effectiveness for both subtask A and subtask C.

2010

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Creating a Reusable English-Chinese Parallel Corpus for Bilingual Dictionary Construction
Hercules Dalianis | Hao-chun Xing | Xin Zhang
Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'10)

This paper first describes an experiment to construct an English-Chinese parallel corpus, then applying the Uplug word alignment tool on the corpus and finally produce and evaluate an English-Chinese word list. The Stockholm English-Chinese Parallel Corpus (SEC) was created by downloading English-Chinese parallel corpora from a Chinese web site containing law texts that have been manually translated from Chinese to English. The parallel corpus contains 104 563 Chinese characters equivalent to 59 918 Chinese words, and the corresponding English corpus contains 75 766 English words. However Chinese writing does not utilize any delimiters to mark word boundaries so we had to carry out word segmentation as a preprocessing step on the Chinese corpus. Moreover since the parallel corpus is downloaded from Internet the corpus is noisy regarding to alignment between corresponding translated sentences. Therefore we used 60 hours of manually work to align the sentences in the English and Chinese parallel corpus before performing automatic word alignment using Uplug. The word alignment with Uplug was carried out from English to Chinese. Nine respondents evaluated the resulting English-Chinese word list with frequency equal to or above three and we obtained an accuracy of 73.1 percent.