Yang Liu

刘扬; Ph.D Purdue; ICSI, Dallas, Facebook, Liulishuo, Amazon

Also published as: Y. Liu

Other people with similar names: Yang Liu (May refer to several people), Yang Liu (Edinburgh), Yang (Janet) Liu (刘洋; Georgetown), Yang Liu (Georgetown University), Yang Liu (刘洋; ICT, Tsinghua, Beijing Academy of Artificial Intelligence), Yang Liu (Univ. of Michigan, UC Santa Cruz)


2021

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Personalized Entity Resolution with Dynamic Heterogeneous KnowledgeGraph Representations
Ying Lin | Han Wang | Jiangning Chen | Tong Wang | Yue Liu | Heng Ji | Yang Liu | Premkumar Natarajan
Proceedings of The 4th Workshop on e-Commerce and NLP

The growing popularity of Virtual Assistants poses new challenges for Entity Resolution, the task of linking mentions in text to their referent entities in a knowledge base. Specifically, in the shopping domain, customers tend to mention the entities implicitly (e.g., “organic milk”) rather than use the entity names explicitly, leading to a large number of candidate products. Meanwhile, for the same query, different customers may expect different results. For example, with “add milk to my cart”, a customer may refer to a certain product from his/her favorite brand, while some customers may want to re-order products they regularly purchase. Moreover, new customers may lack persistent shopping history, which requires us to enrich the connections between customers through products and their attributes. To address these issues, we propose a new framework that leverages personalized features to improve the accuracy of product ranking. We first build a cross-source heterogeneous knowledge graph from customer purchase history and product knowledge graph to jointly learn customer and product embeddings. After that, we incorporate product, customer, and history representations into a neural reranking model to predict which candidate is most likely to be purchased by a specific customer. Experiment results show that our model substantially improves the accuracy of the top ranked candidates by 24.6% compared to the state-of-the-art product search model.

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Improving Factual Consistency of Abstractive Summarization on Customer Feedback
Yang Liu | Yifei Sun | Vincent Gao
Proceedings of The 4th Workshop on e-Commerce and NLP

E-commerce stores collect customer feedback to let sellers learn about customer concerns and enhance customer order experience. Because customer feedback often contains redundant information, a concise summary of the feedback can be generated to help sellers better understand the issues causing customer dissatisfaction. Previous state-of-the-art abstractive text summarization models make two major types of factual errors when producing summaries from customer feedback, which are wrong entity detection (WED) and incorrect product-defect description (IPD). In this work, we introduce a set of methods to enhance the factual consistency of abstractive summarization on customer feedback. We augment the training data with artificially corrupted summaries, and use them as counterparts of the target summaries. We add a contrastive loss term into the training objective so that the model learns to avoid certain factual errors. Evaluation results show that a large portion of WED and IPD errors are alleviated for BART and T5. Furthermore, our approaches do not depend on the structure of the summarization model and thus are generalizable to any abstractive summarization systems.

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Commonsense-Focused Dialogues for Response Generation: An Empirical Study
Pei Zhou | Karthik Gopalakrishnan | Behnam Hedayatnia | Seokhwan Kim | Jay Pujara | Xiang Ren | Yang Liu | Dilek Hakkani-Tur
Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Special Interest Group on Discourse and Dialogue

Smooth and effective communication requires the ability to perform latent or explicit commonsense inference. Prior commonsense reasoning benchmarks (such as SocialIQA and CommonsenseQA) mainly focus on the discriminative task of choosing the right answer from a set of candidates, and do not involve interactive language generation as in dialogue. Moreover, existing dialogue datasets do not explicitly focus on exhibiting commonsense as a facet. In this paper, we present an empirical study of commonsense in dialogue response generation. We first auto-extract commonsensical dialogues from existing dialogue datasets by leveraging ConceptNet, a commonsense knowledge graph. Furthermore, building on social contexts/situations in SocialIQA, we collect a new dialogue dataset with 25K dialogues aimed at exhibiting social commonsense in an interactive setting. We evaluate response generation models trained using these datasets and find that models trained on both extracted and our collected data produce responses that consistently exhibit more commonsense than baselines. Finally we propose an approach for automatic evaluation of commonsense that relies on features derived from ConceptNet and pre-trained language and dialog models, and show reasonable correlation with human evaluation of responses’ commonsense quality.

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基于词信息嵌入的汉语构词结构识别研究(Chinese Word-Formation Prediction based on Representations of Word-Related Features)
Hua Zheng (郑婳) | Yaqi Yan (殷雅琦) | Yue Wang (王悦) | Damai Dai (代达劢) | Yang Liu (刘扬)
Proceedings of the 20th Chinese National Conference on Computational Linguistics

“作为一种意合型语言,汉语中的构词结构刻画了构词成分之间的组合关系,是认知、理解词义的关键。在中文信息处理领域,此前的构词结构识别工作大多沿用句法层面的粗粒度标签,且主要基于上下文等词间信息建模,忽略了语素义、词义等词内信息对构词结构识别的作用。本文采用语言学视域下的构词结构标签体系,构建汉语构词结构及相关信息数据集,提出了一种基于Bi-LSTM和Self-attention的模型,以此来探究词内、词间等多方面信息对构词结构识别的潜在影响和能达到的性能。实验取得了良好的预测效果,准确率77.87%,F1值78.36%;同时,对比测试揭示,词内的语素义信息对构词结构识别具有显著的贡献,而词间的上下文信息贡献较弱且带有较强的不稳定性。该预测方法与数据集,将为中文信息处理的多种任务,如语素和词结构分析、词义识别与生成、语言文字研究与词典编纂等提供新的观点和方案。”

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Optimizing NLU Reranking Using Entity Resolution Signals in Multi-domain Dialog Systems
Tong Wang | Jiangning Chen | Mohsen Malmir | Shuyan Dong | Xin He | Han Wang | Chengwei Su | Yue Liu | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies: Industry Papers

In dialog systems, the Natural Language Understanding (NLU) component typically makes the interpretation decision (including domain, intent and slots) for an utterance before the mentioned entities are resolved. This may result in intent classification and slot tagging errors. In this work, we propose to leverage Entity Resolution (ER) features in NLU reranking and introduce a novel loss term based on ER signals to better learn model weights in the reranking framework. In addition, for a multi-domain dialog scenario, we propose a score distribution matching method to ensure scores generated by the NLU reranking models for different domains are properly calibrated. In offline experiments, we demonstrate our proposed approach significantly outperforms the baseline model on both single-domain and cross-domain evaluations.

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Entity Resolution in Open-domain Conversations
Mingyue Shang | Tong Wang | Mihail Eric | Jiangning Chen | Jiyang Wang | Matthew Welch | Tiantong Deng | Akshay Grewal | Han Wang | Yue Liu | Yang Liu | Dilek Hakkani-Tur
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies: Industry Papers

In recent years, incorporating external knowledge for response generation in open-domain conversation systems has attracted great interest. To improve the relevancy of retrieved knowledge, we propose a neural entity linking (NEL) approach. Different from formal documents, such as news, conversational utterances are informal and multi-turn, which makes it more challenging to disambiguate the entities. Therefore, we present a context-aware named entity recognition model (NER) and entity resolution (ER) model to utilize dialogue context information. We conduct NEL experiments on three open-domain conversation datasets and validate that incorporating context information improves the performance of NER and ER models. The end-to-end NEL approach outperforms the baseline by 62.8% relatively in F1 metric. Furthermore, we verify that using external knowledge based on NEL benefits the neural response generation model.

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Multi-Sentence Knowledge Selection in Open-Domain Dialogue
Mihail Eric | Nicole Chartier | Behnam Hedayatnia | Karthik Gopalakrishnan | Pankaj Rajan | Yang Liu | Dilek Hakkani-Tur
Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Natural Language Generation

Incorporating external knowledge sources effectively in conversations is a longstanding problem in open-domain dialogue research. The existing literature on open-domain knowledge selection is limited and makes certain brittle assumptions on knowledge sources to simplify the overall task, such as the existence of a single relevant knowledge sentence per context. In this work, we evaluate the existing state of open-domain conversation knowledge selection, showing where the existing methodologies regarding data and evaluation are flawed. We then improve on them by proposing a new framework for collecting relevant knowledge, and create an augmented dataset based on the Wizard of Wikipedia (WOW) corpus, which we call WOW++. WOW++ averages 8 relevant knowledge sentences per dialogue context, embracing the inherent ambiguity of open-domain dialogue knowledge selection. We then benchmark various knowledge ranking algorithms on this augmented dataset with both intrinsic evaluation and extrinsic measures of response quality, showing that neural rerankers that use WOW++ can outperform rankers trained on standard datasets.

2020

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Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2020
Trevor Cohn | Yulan He | Yang Liu
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2020

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Policy-Driven Neural Response Generation for Knowledge-Grounded Dialog Systems
Behnam Hedayatnia | Karthik Gopalakrishnan | Seokhwan Kim | Yang Liu | Mihail Eric | Dilek Hakkani-Tur
Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Natural Language Generation

Open-domain dialog systems aim to generate relevant, informative and engaging responses. In this paper, we propose using a dialog policy to plan the content and style of target, open domain responses in the form of an action plan, which includes knowledge sentences related to the dialog context, targeted dialog acts, topic information, etc. For training, the attributes within the action plan are obtained by automatically annotating the publicly released Topical-Chat dataset. We condition neural response generators on the action plan which is then realized as target utterances at the turn and sentence levels. We also investigate different dialog policy models to predict an action plan given the dialog context. Through automated and human evaluation, we measure the appropriateness of the generated responses and check if the generation models indeed learn to realize the given action plans. We demonstrate that a basic dialog policy that operates at the sentence level generates better responses in comparison to turn level generation as well as baseline models with no action plan. Additionally the basic dialog policy has the added benefit of controllability.

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Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)
Bonnie Webber | Trevor Cohn | Yulan He | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

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Incorporating Commonsense Knowledge Graph in Pretrained Models for Social Commonsense Tasks
Ting-Yun Chang | Yang Liu | Karthik Gopalakrishnan | Behnam Hedayatnia | Pei Zhou | Dilek Hakkani-Tur
Proceedings of Deep Learning Inside Out (DeeLIO): The First Workshop on Knowledge Extraction and Integration for Deep Learning Architectures

Pretrained language models have excelled at many NLP tasks recently; however, their social intelligence is still unsatisfactory. To enable this, machines need to have a more general understanding of our complicated world and develop the ability to perform commonsense reasoning besides fitting the specific downstream tasks. External commonsense knowledge graphs (KGs), such as ConceptNet, provide rich information about words and their relationships. Thus, towards general commonsense learning, we propose two approaches to implicitly and explicitly infuse such KGs into pretrained language models. We demonstrate our proposed methods perform well on SocialIQA, a social commonsense reasoning task, in both limited and full training data regimes.

2019

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The LAIX Systems in the BEA-2019 GEC Shared Task
Ruobing Li | Chuan Wang | Yefei Zha | Yonghong Yu | Shiman Guo | Qiang Wang | Yang Liu | Hui Lin
Proceedings of the Fourteenth Workshop on Innovative Use of NLP for Building Educational Applications

In this paper, we describe two systems we developed for the three tracks we have participated in the BEA-2019 GEC Shared Task. We investigate competitive classification models with bi-directional recurrent neural networks (Bi-RNN) and neural machine translation (NMT) models. For different tracks, we use ensemble systems to selectively combine the NMT models, the classification models, and some rules, and demonstrate that an ensemble solution can effectively improve GEC performance over single systems. Our GEC systems ranked the first in the Unrestricted Track, and the third in both the Restricted Track and the Low Resource Track.

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Automated Essay Scoring with Discourse-Aware Neural Models
Farah Nadeem | Huy Nguyen | Yang Liu | Mari Ostendorf
Proceedings of the Fourteenth Workshop on Innovative Use of NLP for Building Educational Applications

Automated essay scoring systems typically rely on hand-crafted features to predict essay quality, but such systems are limited by the cost of feature engineering. Neural networks offer an alternative to feature engineering, but they typically require more annotated data. This paper explores network structures, contextualized embeddings and pre-training strategies aimed at capturing discourse characteristics of essays. Experiments on three essay scoring tasks show benefits from all three strategies in different combinations, with simpler architectures being more effective when less training data is available.

2018

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A Reinforcement Learning Framework for Natural Question Generation using Bi-discriminators
Zhihao Fan | Zhongyu Wei | Siyuan Wang | Yang Liu | Xuanjing Huang
Proceedings of the 27th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

Visual Question Generation (VQG) aims to ask natural questions about an image automatically. Existing research focus on training model to fit the annotated data set that makes it indifferent from other language generation tasks. We argue that natural questions need to have two specific attributes from the perspectives of content and linguistic respectively, namely, natural and human-written. Inspired by the setting of discriminator in adversarial learning, we propose two discriminators, one for each attribute, to enhance the training. We then use the reinforcement learning framework to incorporate scores from the two discriminators as the reward to guide the training of the question generator. Experimental results on a benchmark VQG dataset show the effectiveness and robustness of our model compared to some state-of-the-art models in terms of both automatic and human evaluation metrics.

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Incorporating Argument-Level Interactions for Persuasion Comments Evaluation using Co-attention Model
Lu Ji | Zhongyu Wei | Xiangkun Hu | Yang Liu | Qi Zhang | Xuanjing Huang
Proceedings of the 27th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

In this paper, we investigate the issue of persuasiveness evaluation for argumentative comments. Most of the existing research explores different text features of reply comments on word level and ignores interactions between participants. In general, viewpoints are usually expressed by multiple arguments and exchanged on argument level. To better model the process of dialogical argumentation, we propose a novel co-attention mechanism based neural network to capture the interactions between participants on argument level. Experimental results on a publicly available dataset show that the proposed model significantly outperforms some state-of-the-art methods for persuasiveness evaluation. Further analysis reveals that attention weights computed in our model are able to extract interactive argument pairs from the original post and the reply.

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Proceedings of the 2018 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Demonstrations
Yang Liu | Tim Paek | Manasi Patwardhan
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Demonstrations

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Incorporating Topic Aspects for Online Comment Convincingness Evaluation
Yunfan Gu | Zhongyu Wei | Maoran Xu | Hao Fu | Yang Liu | Xuanjing Huang
Proceedings of the 5th Workshop on Argument Mining

In this paper, we propose to incorporate topic aspects information for online comments convincingness evaluation. Our model makes use of graph convolutional network to utilize implicit topic information within a discussion thread to assist the evaluation of convincingness of each single comment. In order to test the effectiveness of our proposed model, we annotate topic information on top of a public dataset for argument convincingness evaluation. Experimental results show that topic information is able to improve the performance for convincingness evaluation. We also make a move to detect topic aspects automatically.

2017

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A non-DNN Feature Engineering Approach to Dependency Parsing – FBAML at CoNLL 2017 Shared Task
Xian Qian | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the CoNLL 2017 Shared Task: Multilingual Parsing from Raw Text to Universal Dependencies

For this year’s multilingual dependency parsing shared task, we developed a pipeline system, which uses a variety of features for each of its components. Unlike the recent popular deep learning approaches that learn low dimensional dense features using non-linear classifier, our system uses structured linear classifiers to learn millions of sparse features. Specifically, we trained a linear classifier for sentence boundary prediction, linear chain conditional random fields (CRFs) for tokenization, part-of-speech tagging and morph analysis. A second order graph based parser learns the tree structure (without relations), and fa linear tree CRF then assigns relations to the dependencies in the tree. Our system achieves reasonable performance – 67.87% official averaged macro F1 score

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Using Context Information for Dialog Act Classification in DNN Framework
Yang Liu | Kun Han | Zhao Tan | Yun Lei
Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Previous work on dialog act (DA) classification has investigated different methods, such as hidden Markov models, maximum entropy, conditional random fields, graphical models, and support vector machines. A few recent studies explored using deep learning neural networks for DA classification, however, it is not clear yet what is the best method for using dialog context or DA sequential information, and how much gain it brings. This paper proposes several ways of using context information for DA classification, all in the deep learning framework. The baseline system classifies each utterance using the convolutional neural networks (CNN). Our proposed methods include using hierarchical models (recurrent neural networks (RNN) or CNN) for DA sequence tagging where the bottom layer takes the sentence CNN representation as input, concatenating predictions from the previous utterances with the CNN vector for classification, and performing sequence decoding based on the predictions from the sentence CNN model. We conduct thorough experiments and comparisons on the Switchboard corpus, demonstrate that incorporating context information significantly improves DA classification, and show that we achieve new state-of-the-art performance for this task.

2016

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Is This Post Persuasive? Ranking Argumentative Comments in Online Forum
Zhongyu Wei | Yang Liu | Yi Li
Proceedings of the 54th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 2: Short Papers)

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An Efficient Cross-lingual Model for Sentence Classification Using Convolutional Neural Network
Yandi Xia | Zhongyu Wei | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the ACL 2016 Student Research Workshop

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A Preliminary Study of Disputation Behavior in Online Debating Forum
Zhongyu Wei | Yandi Xia | Chen Li | Yang Liu | Zachary Stallbohm | Yi Li | Yang Jin
Proceedings of the Third Workshop on Argument Mining (ArgMining2016)

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Using Relevant Public Posts to Enhance News Article Summarization
Chen Li | Zhongyu Wei | Yang Liu | Yang Jin | Fei Huang
Proceedings of COLING 2016, the 26th International Conference on Computational Linguistics: Technical Papers

A news article summary usually consists of 2-3 key sentences that reflect the gist of that news article. In this paper we explore using public posts following a new article to improve automatic summary generation for the news article. We propose different approaches to incorporate information from public posts, including using frequency information from the posts to re-estimate bigram weights in the ILP-based summarization model and to re-weight a dependency tree edge’s importance for sentence compression, directly selecting sentences from posts as the final summary, and finally a strategy to combine the summarization results generated from news articles and posts. Our experiments on data collected from Facebook show that relevant public posts provide useful information and can be effectively leveraged to improve news article summarization results.

2015

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Improving Named Entity Recognition in Tweets via Detecting Non-Standard Words
Chen Li | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 53rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 7th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

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Feature Selection in Kernel Space: A Case Study on Dependency Parsing
Xian Qian | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 53rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 7th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

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Using Tweets to Help Sentence Compression for News Highlights Generation
Zhongyu Wei | Yang Liu | Chen Li | Wei Gao
Proceedings of the 53rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 7th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 2: Short Papers)

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Using External Resources and Joint Learning for Bigram Weighting in ILP-Based Multi-Document Summarization
Chen Li | Yang Liu | Lin Zhao
Proceedings of the 2015 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

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Improving Update Summarization via Supervised ILP and Sentence Reranking
Chen Li | Yang Liu | Lin Zhao
Proceedings of the 2015 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

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Proceedings of the 2015 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Tutorial Abstracts
Yang Liu | Thamar Solorio
Proceedings of the 2015 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Tutorial Abstracts

2014

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2-Slave Dual Decomposition for Generalized Higher Order CRFs
Xian Qian | Yang Liu
Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics, Volume 2

We show that the decoding problem in generalized Higher Order Conditional Random Fields (CRFs) can be decomposed into two parts: one is a tree labeling problem that can be solved in linear time using dynamic programming; the other is a supermodular quadratic pseudo-Boolean maximization problem, which can be solved in cubic time using a minimum cut algorithm. We use dual decomposition to force their agreement. Experimental results on Twitter named entity recognition and sentence dependency tagging tasks show that our method outperforms spanning tree based dual decomposition.

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Improving Multi-documents Summarization by Sentence Compression based on Expanded Constituent Parse Trees
Chen Li | Yang Liu | Fei Liu | Lin Zhao | Fuliang Weng
Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

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Polynomial Time Joint Structural Inference for Sentence Compression
Xian Qian | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 52nd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 2: Short Papers)

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Improving Text Normalization via Unsupervised Model and Discriminative Reranking
Chen Li | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the ACL 2014 Student Research Workshop

2013

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Document Summarization via Guided Sentence Compression
Chen Li | Fei Liu | Fuliang Weng | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 2013 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

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Fast Joint Compression and Summarization via Graph Cuts
Xian Qian | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 2013 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

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Disfluency Detection Using Multi-step Stacked Learning
Xian Qian | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 2013 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

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Simple Yet Powerful Native Language Identification on TOEFL11
Ching-Yi Wu | Po-Hsiang Lai | Yang Liu | Vincent Ng
Proceedings of the Eighth Workshop on Innovative Use of NLP for Building Educational Applications

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Exploring Word Class N-grams to Measure Language Development in Children
Gabriela Ramírez de la Rosa | Thamar Solorio | Manuel Montes | Yang Liu | Lisa Bedore | Elizabeth Peña | Aquiles Iglesias
Proceedings of the 2013 Workshop on Biomedical Natural Language Processing

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Using Latent Dirichlet Allocation for Child Narrative Analysis
Khairun-nisa Hassanali | Yang Liu | Thamar Solorio
Proceedings of the 2013 Workshop on Biomedical Natural Language Processing

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Branch and Bound Algorithm for Dependency Parsing with Non-local Features
Xian Qian | Yang Liu
Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics, Volume 1

Graph based dependency parsing is inefficient when handling non-local features due to high computational complexity of inference. In this paper, we proposed an exact and efficient decoding algorithm based on the Branch and Bound (B&B) framework where non-local features are bounded by a linear combination of local features. Dynamic programming is used to search the upper bound. Experiments are conducted on English PTB and Chinese CTB datasets. We achieved competitive Unlabeled Attachment Score (UAS) when no additional resources are available: 93.17% for English and 87.25% for Chinese. Parsing speed is 177 words per second for English and 97 words per second for Chinese. Our algorithm is general and can be adapted to non-projective dependency parsing or other graphical models.

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Using Supervised Bigram-based ILP for Extractive Summarization
Chen Li | Xian Qian | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 51st Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

2012

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Joint Chinese Word Segmentation, POS Tagging and Parsing
Xian Qian | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 2012 Joint Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing and Computational Natural Language Learning

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Improving Text Normalization using Character-Blocks Based Models and System Combination
Chen Li | Yang Liu
Proceedings of COLING 2012

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Sentence Dependency Tagging in Online Question Answering Forums
Zhonghua Qu | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 50th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

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A Two-step Approach to Sentence Compression of Spoken Utterances
Dong Wang | Xian Qian | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 50th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 2: Short Papers)

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User Participation Prediction in Online Forums
Zhonghua Qu | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 13th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics

2011

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Proceedings of the Workshop on Automatic Summarization for Different Genres, Media, and Languages
Ani Nenkova | Julia Hirschberg | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the Workshop on Automatic Summarization for Different Genres, Media, and Languages

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Why is “SXSW” trending? Exploring Multiple Text Sources for Twitter Topic Summarization
Fei Liu | Yang Liu | Fuliang Weng
Proceedings of the Workshop on Language in Social Media (LSM 2011)

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Measuring Language Development in Early Childhood Education: A Case Study of Grammar Checking in Child Language Transcripts
Khairun-nisa Hassanali | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the Sixth Workshop on Innovative Use of NLP for Building Educational Applications

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A Cross-corpus Study of Unsupervised Subjectivity Identification based on Calibrated EM
Dong Wang | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Computational Approaches to Subjectivity and Sentiment Analysis (WASSA 2.011)

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A Character-Level Machine Translation Approach for Normalization of SMS Abbreviations
Deana Pennell | Yang Liu
Proceedings of 5th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing

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Learning from Chinese-English Parallel Data for Chinese Tense Prediction
Feifan Liu | Fei Liu | Yang Liu
Proceedings of 5th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing

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Finding Problem Solving Threads in Online Forum
Zhonghua Qu | Yang Liu
Proceedings of 5th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing

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A Pilot Study of Opinion Summarization in Conversations
Dong Wang | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 49th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

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N-Best Rescoring Based on Pitch-accent Patterns
Je Hun Jeon | Wen Wang | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 49th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

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Insertion, Deletion, or Substitution? Normalizing Text Messages without Pre-categorization nor Supervision
Fei Liu | Fuliang Weng | Bingqing Wang | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 49th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

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Interactive Group Suggesting for Twitter
Zhonghua Qu | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 49th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

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Automatic Summarization
Ani Nenkova | Sameer Maskey | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 49th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Tutorial Abstracts

2010

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Using Confusion Networks for Speech Summarization
Shasha Xie | Yang Liu
Human Language Technologies: The 2010 Annual Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics

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Improving Blog Polarity Classification via Topic Analysis and Adaptive Methods
Feifan Liu | Dong Wang | Bin Li | Yang Liu
Human Language Technologies: The 2010 Annual Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics

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Non-Expert Evaluation of Summarization Systems is Risky
Dan Gillick | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the NAACL HLT 2010 Workshop on Creating Speech and Language Data with Amazon’s Mechanical Turk

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Coling 2010: Demonstrations
Yang Liu | Ting Liu
Coling 2010: Demonstrations

2009

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Semi-supervised Learning for Automatic Prosodic Event Detection Using Co-training Algorithm
Je Hun Jeon | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the Joint Conference of the 47th Annual Meeting of the ACL and the 4th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing of the AFNLP

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From Extractive to Abstractive Meeting Summaries: Can It Be Done by Sentence Compression?
Fei Liu | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the ACL-IJCNLP 2009 Conference Short Papers

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A Corpus-Based Approach for the Prediction of Language Impairment in Monolingual English and Spanish-English Bilingual Children
Keyur Gabani | Melissa Sherman | Thamar Solorio | Yang Liu | Lisa Bedore | Elizabeth Peña
Proceedings of Human Language Technologies: The 2009 Annual Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics

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Unsupervised Approaches for Automatic Keyword Extraction Using Meeting Transcripts
Feifan Liu | Deana Pennell | Fei Liu | Yang Liu
Proceedings of Human Language Technologies: The 2009 Annual Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics

2008

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What Are Meeting Summaries? An Analysis of Human Extractive Summaries in Meeting Corpus
Fei Liu | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 9th SIGdial Workshop on Discourse and Dialogue

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Using Language Models to Identify Language Impairment in Spanish-English Bilingual Children
Thamar Solorio | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the Workshop on Current Trends in Biomedical Natural Language Processing

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Learning to Predict Code-Switching Points
Thamar Solorio | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 2008 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

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Part-of-Speech Tagging for English-Spanish Code-Switched Text
Thamar Solorio | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 2008 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

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Correlation between ROUGE and Human Evaluation of Extractive Meeting Summaries
Feifan Liu | Yang Liu
Proceedings of ACL-08: HLT, Short Papers

2007

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Look Who is Talking: Soundbite Speaker Name Recognition in Broadcast News Speech
Feifan Liu | Yang Liu
Human Language Technologies 2007: The Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics; Companion Volume, Short Papers

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Unsupervised Language Model Adaptation Incorporating Named Entity Information
Feifan Liu | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the 45th Annual Meeting of the Association of Computational Linguistics

2006

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PCFGs with Syntactic and Prosodic Indicators of Speech Repairs
John Hale | Izhak Shafran | Lisa Yung | Bonnie J. Dorr | Mary Harper | Anna Krasnyanskaya | Matthew Lease | Yang Liu | Brian Roark | Matthew Snover | Robin Stewart
Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computational Linguistics and 44th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

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Off-Topic Detection in Conversational Telephone Speech
Robin Stewart | Andrea Danyluk | Yang Liu
Proceedings of the Analyzing Conversations in Text and Speech

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SParseval: Evaluation Metrics for Parsing Speech
Brian Roark | Mary Harper | Eugene Charniak | Bonnie Dorr | Mark Johnson | Jeremy Kahn | Yang Liu | Mari Ostendorf | John Hale | Anna Krasnyanskaya | Matthew Lease | Izhak Shafran | Matthew Snover | Robin Stewart | Lisa Yung
Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC’06)

While both spoken and written language processing stand to benefit from parsing, the standard Parseval metrics (Black et al., 1991) and their canonical implementation (Sekine and Collins, 1997) are only useful for text. The Parseval metrics are undefined when the words input to the parser do not match the words in the gold standard parse tree exactly, and word errors are unavoidable with automatic speech recognition (ASR) systems. To fill this gap, we have developed a publicly available tool for scoring parses that implements a variety of metrics which can handle mismatches in words and segmentations, including: alignment-based bracket evaluation, alignment-based dependency evaluation, and a dependency evaluation that does not require alignment. We describe the different metrics, how to use the tool, and the outcome of an extensive set of experiments on the sensitivity.

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Linguistic Resources for Speech Parsing
Ann Bies | Stephanie Strassel | Haejoong Lee | Kazuaki Maeda | Seth Kulick | Yang Liu | Mary Harper | Matthew Lease
Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC’06)

We report on the success of a two-pass approach to annotating metadata, speech effects and syntactic structure in English conversational speech: separately annotating transcribed speech for structural metadata, or structural events, (fillers, speech repairs ( or edit dysfluencies) and SUs, or syntactic/semantic units) and for syntactic structure (treebanking constituent structure and shallow argument structure). The two annotations were then combined into a single representation. Certain alignment issues between the two types of annotation led to the discovery and correction of annotation errors in each, resulting in a more accurate and useful resource. The development of this corpus was motivated by the need to have both metadata and syntactic structure annotated in order to support synergistic work on speech parsing and structural event detection. Automatic detection of these speech phenomena would simultaneously improve parsing accuracy and provide a mechanism for cleaning up transcriptions for downstream text processing. Similarly, constraints imposed by text processing systems such as parsers can be used to help improve identification of disfluencies and sentence boundaries. This paper reports on our efforts to develop a linguistic resource providing both spoken metadata and syntactic structure information, and describes the resulting corpus of English conversational speech.

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Initial Study on Automatic Identification of Speaker Role in Broadcast News Speech
Yang Liu
Proceedings of the Human Language Technology Conference of the NAACL, Companion Volume: Short Papers

2005

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Using Conditional Random Fields for Sentence Boundary Detection in Speech
Yang Liu | Andreas Stolcke | Elizabeth Shriberg | Mary Harper
Proceedings of the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL’05)

2004

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Comparing and Combining Generative and Posterior Probability Models: Some Advances in Sentence Boundary Detection in Speech
Yang Liu | Andreas Stolcke | Elizabeth Shriberg | Mary Harper
Proceedings of the 2004 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

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Improving Automatic Sentence Boundary Detection with Confusion Networks
D. Hillard | M. Ostendorf | A. Stolcke | Y. Liu | E. Shriberg
Proceedings of HLT-NAACL 2004: Short Papers

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Evaluating Factors Impacting the Accuracy of Forced Alignments in a Multimodal Corpus
Lei Chen | Yang Liu | Mary Harper | Eduardo Maia | Susan McRoy
Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC’04)

People, when processing human-to-human communication, utilize everything they can in order to understand that communication, including speech and information such as the time and location of an interlocutor's gesture and gaze. Speech and gesture are known to exhibit a synchronous relationship in human communication; however, the precise nature of that relationship requires further investigation. The construction of computer models of multimodal human communication would be enabled by the availability of multimodal communication corpora annotated with synchronized gesture and speech features. To investigate the temporal relationships of these knowledge sources, we have collected and are annotating several multimodal corpora with time-aligned features. Forced alignment between a speech file and its transcription is a crucial part of multimodal corpus production. This paper investigates a number of factors that may contribute to highly accurate forced alignments to support the rapid production of these multimodal corpora including the acoustic model, the match between the speech used for training the system and that to be force aligned, the amount of data used to train the ASR system, the availability of speaker adaptation, and the duration of alignment segments.

2003

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Word Fragments Identification Using Acoustic-Prosodic Features in Conversational Speech
Yang Liu
Proceedings of the HLT-NAACL 2003 Student Research Workshop

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