Yoon Kim


2022

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Controlling the Focus of Pretrained Language Generation Models
Jiabao Ji | Yoon Kim | James Glass | Tianxing He
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: ACL 2022

The finetuning of pretrained transformer-based language generation models are typically conducted in an end-to-end manner, where the model learns to attend to relevant parts of the input by itself. However, there does not exist a mechanism to directly control the model’s focus. This work aims to develop a control mechanism by which a user can select spans of context as “highlights” for the model to focus on, and generate relevant output. To achieve this goal, we augment a pretrained model with trainable “focus vectors” that are directly applied to the model’s embeddings, while the model itself is kept fixed. These vectors, trained on automatic annotations derived from attribution methods, act as indicators for context importance. We test our approach on two core generation tasks: dialogue response generation and abstractive summarization. We also collect evaluation data where the highlight-generation pairs are annotated by humans. Our experiments show that the trained focus vectors are effective in steering the model to generate outputs that are relevant to user-selected highlights.

2021

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Syntactic Perturbations Reveal Representational Correlates of Hierarchical Phrase Structure in Pretrained Language Models
Matteo Alleman | Jonathan Mamou | Miguel A Del Rio | Hanlin Tang | Yoon Kim | SueYeon Chung
Proceedings of the 6th Workshop on Representation Learning for NLP (RepL4NLP-2021)

While vector-based language representations from pretrained language models have set a new standard for many NLP tasks, there is not yet a complete accounting of their inner workings. In particular, it is not entirely clear what aspects of sentence-level syntax are captured by these representations, nor how (if at all) they are built along the stacked layers of the network. In this paper, we aim to address such questions with a general class of interventional, input perturbation-based analyses of representations from pretrained language models. Importing from computational and cognitive neuroscience the notion of representational invariance, we perform a series of probes designed to test the sensitivity of these representations to several kinds of structure in sentences. Each probe involves swapping words in a sentence and comparing the representations from perturbed sentences against the original. We experiment with three different perturbations: (1) random permutations of n-grams of varying width, to test the scale at which a representation is sensitive to word position; (2) swapping of two spans which do or do not form a syntactic phrase, to test sensitivity to global phrase structure; and (3) swapping of two adjacent words which do or do not break apart a syntactic phrase, to test sensitivity to local phrase structure. Results from these probes collectively suggest that Transformers build sensitivity to larger parts of the sentence along their layers, and that hierarchical phrase structure plays a role in this process. More broadly, our results also indicate that structured input perturbations widens the scope of analyses that can be performed on often-opaque deep learning systems, and can serve as a complement to existing tools (such as supervised linear probes) for interpreting complex black-box models.

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Parameter-Efficient Transfer Learning with Diff Pruning
Demi Guo | Alexander Rush | Yoon Kim
Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 11th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (Volume 1: Long Papers)

The large size of pretrained networks makes them difficult to deploy for multiple tasks in storage-constrained settings. Diff pruning enables parameter-efficient transfer learning that scales well with new tasks. The approach learns a task-specific “diff” vector that extends the original pretrained parameters. This diff vector is adaptively pruned during training with a differentiable approximation to the L0-norm penalty to encourage sparsity. As the number of tasks increases, diff pruning remains parameter-efficient, as it requires storing only a small diff vector for each task. Since it does not require access to all tasks during training, it is attractive in on-device deployment settings where tasks arrive in stream or even from different providers. Diff pruning can match the performance of finetuned baselines on the GLUE benchmark while only modifying 0.5% of the pretrained model’s parameters per task and scales favorably in comparison to popular pruning approaches.

2020

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Sequence-Level Mixed Sample Data Augmentation
Demi Guo | Yoon Kim | Alexander Rush
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

Despite their empirical success, neural networks still have difficulty capturing compositional aspects of natural language. This work proposes a simple data augmentation approach to encourage compositional behavior in neural models for sequence-to-sequence problems. Our approach, SeqMix, creates new synthetic examples by softly combining input/output sequences from the training set. We connect this approach to existing techniques such as SwitchOut and word dropout, and show that these techniques are all essentially approximating variants of a single objective. SeqMix consistently yields approximately 1.0 BLEU improvement on five different translation datasets over strong Transformer baselines. On tasks that require strong compositional generalization such as SCAN and semantic parsing, SeqMix also offers further improvements.

2019

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Compound Probabilistic Context-Free Grammars for Grammar Induction
Yoon Kim | Chris Dyer | Alexander Rush
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

We study a formalization of the grammar induction problem that models sentences as being generated by a compound probabilistic context free grammar. In contrast to traditional formulations which learn a single stochastic grammar, our context-free rule probabilities are modulated by a per-sentence continuous latent variable, which induces marginal dependencies beyond the traditional context-free assumptions. Inference in this context-dependent grammar is performed by collapsed variational inference, in which an amortized variational posterior is placed on the continuous variable, and the latent trees are marginalized with dynamic programming. Experiments on English and Chinese show the effectiveness of our approach compared to recent state-of-the-art methods for grammar induction from words with neural language models.

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Unsupervised Recurrent Neural Network Grammars
Yoon Kim | Alexander Rush | Lei Yu | Adhiguna Kuncoro | Chris Dyer | Gábor Melis
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 1 (Long and Short Papers)

Recurrent neural network grammars (RNNG) are generative models of language which jointly model syntax and surface structure by incrementally generating a syntax tree and sentence in a top-down, left-to-right order. Supervised RNNGs achieve strong language modeling and parsing performance, but require an annotated corpus of parse trees. In this work, we experiment with unsupervised learning of RNNGs. Since directly marginalizing over the space of latent trees is intractable, we instead apply amortized variational inference. To maximize the evidence lower bound, we develop an inference network parameterized as a neural CRF constituency parser. On language modeling, unsupervised RNNGs perform as well their supervised counterparts on benchmarks in English and Chinese. On constituency grammar induction, they are competitive with recent neural language models that induce tree structures from words through attention mechanisms.

2018

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OpenNMT: Neural Machine Translation Toolkit
Guillaume Klein | Yoon Kim | Yuntian Deng | Vincent Nguyen | Jean Senellart | Alexander Rush
Proceedings of the 13th Conference of the Association for Machine Translation in the Americas (Volume 1: Research Track)

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Deep Latent Variable Models of Natural Language
Alexander Rush | Yoon Kim | Sam Wiseman
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing: Tutorial Abstracts

The proposed tutorial will cover deep latent variable models both in the case where exact inference over the latent variables is tractable and when it is not. The former case includes neural extensions of unsupervised tagging and parsing models. Our discussion of the latter case, where inference cannot be performed tractably, will restrict itself to continuous latent variables. In particular, we will discuss recent developments both in neural variational inference (e.g., relating to Variational Auto-encoders) and in implicit density modeling (e.g., relating to Generative Adversarial Networks). We will highlight the challenges of applying these families of methods to NLP problems, and discuss recent successes and best practices.

2017

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Adapting Sequence Models for Sentence Correction
Allen Schmaltz | Yoon Kim | Alexander Rush | Stuart Shieber
Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

In a controlled experiment of sequence-to-sequence approaches for the task of sentence correction, we find that character-based models are generally more effective than word-based models and models that encode subword information via convolutions, and that modeling the output data as a series of diffs improves effectiveness over standard approaches. Our strongest sequence-to-sequence model improves over our strongest phrase-based statistical machine translation model, with access to the same data, by 6 M2 (0.5 GLEU) points. Additionally, in the data environment of the standard CoNLL-2014 setup, we demonstrate that modeling (and tuning against) diffs yields similar or better M2 scores with simpler models and/or significantly less data than previous sequence-to-sequence approaches.

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OpenNMT: Open-Source Toolkit for Neural Machine Translation
Guillaume Klein | Yoon Kim | Yuntian Deng | Jean Senellart | Alexander Rush
Proceedings of ACL 2017, System Demonstrations

2016

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Sentence-Level Grammatical Error Identification as Sequence-to-Sequence Correction
Allen Schmaltz | Yoon Kim | Alexander M. Rush | Stuart Shieber
Proceedings of the 11th Workshop on Innovative Use of NLP for Building Educational Applications

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Sequence-Level Knowledge Distillation
Yoon Kim | Alexander M. Rush
Proceedings of the 2016 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

2014

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Convolutional Neural Networks for Sentence Classification
Yoon Kim
Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

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Temporal Analysis of Language through Neural Language Models
Yoon Kim | Yi-I Chiu | Kentaro Hanaki | Darshan Hegde | Slav Petrov
Proceedings of the ACL 2014 Workshop on Language Technologies and Computational Social Science

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Credibility Adjusted Term Frequency: A Supervised Term Weighting Scheme for Sentiment Analysis and Text Classification
Yoon Kim | Owen Zhang
Proceedings of the 5th Workshop on Computational Approaches to Subjectivity, Sentiment and Social Media Analysis