Yushi Aono


2020

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Generating Responses that Reflect Meta Information in User-Generated Question Answer Pairs
Takashi Kodama | Ryuichiro Higashinaka | Koh Mitsuda | Ryo Masumura | Yushi Aono | Ryuta Nakamura | Noritake Adachi | Hidetoshi Kawabata
Proceedings of the 12th Language Resources and Evaluation Conference

This paper concerns the problem of realizing consistent personalities in neural conversational modeling by using user generated question-answer pairs as training data. Using the framework of role play-based question answering, we collected single-turn question-answer pairs for particular characters from online users. Meta information was also collected such as emotion and intimacy related to question-answer pairs. We verified the quality of the collected data and, by subjective evaluation, we also verified their usefulness in training neural conversational models for generating utterances reflecting the meta information, especially emotion.

2018

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Neural Dialogue Context Online End-of-Turn Detection
Ryo Masumura | Tomohiro Tanaka | Atsushi Ando | Ryo Ishii | Ryuichiro Higashinaka | Yushi Aono
Proceedings of the 19th Annual SIGdial Meeting on Discourse and Dialogue

This paper proposes a fully neural network based dialogue-context online end-of-turn detection method that can utilize long-range interactive information extracted from both speaker’s utterances and collocutor’s utterances. The proposed method combines multiple time-asynchronous long short-term memory recurrent neural networks, which can capture speaker’s and collocutor’s multiple sequential features, and their interactions. On the assumption of applying the proposed method to spoken dialogue systems, we introduce speaker’s acoustic sequential features and collocutor’s linguistic sequential features, each of which can be extracted in an online manner. Our evaluation confirms the effectiveness of taking dialogue context formed by the speaker’s utterances and collocutor’s utterances into consideration.

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Multi-task and Multi-lingual Joint Learning of Neural Lexical Utterance Classification based on Partially-shared Modeling
Ryo Masumura | Tomohiro Tanaka | Ryuichiro Higashinaka | Hirokazu Masataki | Yushi Aono
Proceedings of the 27th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

This paper is an initial study on multi-task and multi-lingual joint learning for lexical utterance classification. A major problem in constructing lexical utterance classification modules for spoken dialogue systems is that individual data resources are often limited or unbalanced among tasks and/or languages. Various studies have examined joint learning using neural-network based shared modeling; however, previous joint learning studies focused on either cross-task or cross-lingual knowledge transfer. In order to simultaneously support both multi-task and multi-lingual joint learning, our idea is to explicitly divide state-of-the-art neural lexical utterance classification into language-specific components that can be shared between different tasks and task-specific components that can be shared between different languages. In addition, in order to effectively transfer knowledge between different task data sets and different language data sets, this paper proposes a partially-shared modeling method that possesses both shared components and components specific to individual data sets. We demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed method using Japanese and English data sets with three different lexical utterance classification tasks.

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Adversarial Training for Multi-task and Multi-lingual Joint Modeling of Utterance Intent Classification
Ryo Masumura | Yusuke Shinohara | Ryuichiro Higashinaka | Yushi Aono
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

This paper proposes an adversarial training method for the multi-task and multi-lingual joint modeling needed for utterance intent classification. In joint modeling, common knowledge can be efficiently utilized among multiple tasks or multiple languages. This is achieved by introducing both language-specific networks shared among different tasks and task-specific networks shared among different languages. However, the shared networks are often specialized in majority tasks or languages, so performance degradation must be expected for some minor data sets. In order to improve the invariance of shared networks, the proposed method introduces both language-specific task adversarial networks and task-specific language adversarial networks; both are leveraged for purging the task or language dependencies of the shared networks. The effectiveness of the adversarial training proposal is demonstrated using Japanese and English data sets for three different utterance intent classification tasks.