Zheng Li


2022

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Multilingual Knowledge Graph Completion with Self-Supervised Adaptive Graph Alignment
Zijie Huang | Zheng Li | Haoming Jiang | Tianyu Cao | Hanqing Lu | Bing Yin | Karthik Subbian | Yizhou Sun | Wei Wang
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 1: Long Papers)

Predicting missing facts in a knowledge graph (KG) is crucial as modern KGs are far from complete. Due to labor-intensive human labeling, this phenomenon deteriorates when handling knowledge represented in various languages. In this paper, we explore multilingual KG completion, which leverages limited seed alignment as a bridge, to embrace the collective knowledge from multiple languages. However, language alignment used in prior works is still not fully exploited: (1) alignment pairs are treated equally to maximally push parallel entities to be close, which ignores KG capacity inconsistency; (2) seed alignment is scarce and new alignment identification is usually in a noisily unsupervised manner. To tackle these issues, we propose a novel self-supervised adaptive graph alignment (SS-AGA) method. Specifically, SS-AGA fuses all KGs as a whole graph by regarding alignment as a new edge type. As such, information propagation and noise influence across KGs can be adaptively controlled via relation-aware attention weights. Meanwhile, SS-AGA features a new pair generator that dynamically captures potential alignment pairs in a self-supervised paradigm. Extensive experiments on both the public multilingual DBPedia KG and newly-created industrial multilingual E-commerce KG empirically demonstrate the effectiveness of SS-AGA

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DQ-BART: Efficient Sequence-to-Sequence Model via Joint Distillation and Quantization
Zheng Li | Zijian Wang | Ming Tan | Ramesh Nallapati | Parminder Bhatia | Andrew Arnold | Bing Xiang | Dan Roth
Proceedings of the 60th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Volume 2: Short Papers)

Large-scale pre-trained sequence-to-sequence models like BART and T5 achieve state-of-the-art performance on many generative NLP tasks. However, such models pose a great challenge in resource-constrained scenarios owing to their large memory requirements and high latency. To alleviate this issue, we propose to jointly distill and quantize the model, where knowledge is transferred from the full-precision teacher model to the quantized and distilled low-precision student model. Empirical analyses show that, despite the challenging nature of generative tasks, we were able to achieve a 16.5x model footprint compression ratio with little performance drop relative to the full-precision counterparts on multiple summarization and QA datasets. We further pushed the limit of compression ratio to 27.7x and presented the performance-efficiency trade-off for generative tasks using pre-trained models. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work aiming to effectively distill and quantize sequence-to-sequence pre-trained models for language generation tasks.

2021

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MetaTS: Meta Teacher-Student Network for Multilingual Sequence Labeling with Minimal Supervision
Zheng Li | Danqing Zhang | Tianyu Cao | Ying Wei | Yiwei Song | Bing Yin
Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Sequence labeling aims to predict a fine-grained sequence of labels for the text. However, such formulation hinders the effectiveness of supervised methods due to the lack of token-level annotated data. This is exacerbated when we meet a diverse range of languages. In this work, we explore multilingual sequence labeling with minimal supervision using a single unified model for multiple languages. Specifically, we propose a Meta Teacher-Student (MetaTS) Network, a novel meta learning method to alleviate data scarcity by leveraging large multilingual unlabeled data. Prior teacher-student frameworks of self-training rely on rigid teaching strategies, which may hardly produce high-quality pseudo-labels for consecutive and interdependent tokens. On the contrary, MetaTS allows the teacher to dynamically adapt its pseudo-annotation strategies by the student’s feedback on the generated pseudo-labeled data of each language and thus mitigate error propagation from noisy pseudo-labels. Extensive experiments on both public and real-world multilingual sequence labeling datasets empirically demonstrate the effectiveness of MetaTS.

2020

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Learn to Cross-lingual Transfer with Meta Graph Learning Across Heterogeneous Languages
Zheng Li | Mukul Kumar | William Headden | Bing Yin | Ying Wei | Yu Zhang | Qiang Yang
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

Recent emergence of multilingual pre-training language model (mPLM) has enabled breakthroughs on various downstream cross-lingual transfer (CLT) tasks. However, mPLM-based methods usually involve two problems: (1) simply fine-tuning may not adapt general-purpose multilingual representations to be task-aware on low-resource languages; (2) ignore how cross-lingual adaptation happens for downstream tasks. To address the issues, we propose a meta graph learning (MGL) method. Unlike prior works that transfer from scratch, MGL can learn to cross-lingual transfer by extracting meta-knowledge from historical CLT experiences (tasks), making mPLM insensitive to low-resource languages. Besides, for each CLT task, MGL formulates its transfer process as information propagation over a dynamic graph, where the geometric structure can automatically capture intrinsic language relationships to explicitly guide cross-lingual transfer. Empirically, extensive experiments on both public and real-world datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of the MGL method.

2019

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Transferable End-to-End Aspect-based Sentiment Analysis with Selective Adversarial Learning
Zheng Li | Xin Li | Ying Wei | Lidong Bing | Yu Zhang | Qiang Yang
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing and the 9th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (EMNLP-IJCNLP)

Joint extraction of aspects and sentiments can be effectively formulated as a sequence labeling problem. However, such formulation hinders the effectiveness of supervised methods due to the lack of annotated sequence data in many domains. To address this issue, we firstly explore an unsupervised domain adaptation setting for this task. Prior work can only use common syntactic relations between aspect and opinion words to bridge the domain gaps, which highly relies on external linguistic resources. To resolve it, we propose a novel Selective Adversarial Learning (SAL) method to align the inferred correlation vectors that automatically capture their latent relations. The SAL method can dynamically learn an alignment weight for each word such that more important words can possess higher alignment weights to achieve fine-grained (word-level) adaptation. Empirically, extensive experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed SAL method.

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Pingan Smart Health and SJTU at COIN - Shared Task: utilizing Pre-trained Language Models and Common-sense Knowledge in Machine Reading Tasks
Xiepeng Li | Zhexi Zhang | Wei Zhu | Zheng Li | Yuan Ni | Peng Gao | Junchi Yan | Guotong Xie
Proceedings of the First Workshop on Commonsense Inference in Natural Language Processing

To solve the shared tasks of COIN: COmmonsense INference in Natural Language Processing) Workshop in , we need explore the impact of knowledge representation in modeling commonsense knowledge to boost performance of machine reading comprehension beyond simple text matching. There are two approaches to represent knowledge in the low-dimensional space. The first is to leverage large-scale unsupervised text corpus to train fixed or contextual language representations. The second approach is to explicitly express knowledge into a knowledge graph (KG), and then fit a model to represent the facts in the KG. We have experimented both (a) improving the fine-tuning of pre-trained language models on a task with a small dataset size, by leveraging datasets of similar tasks; and (b) incorporating the distributional representations of a KG onto the representations of pre-trained language models, via simply concatenation or multi-head attention. We find out that: (a) for task 1, first fine-tuning on larger datasets like RACE (Lai et al., 2017) and SWAG (Zellersetal.,2018), and then fine-tuning on the target task improve the performance significantly; (b) for task 2, we find out the incorporating a KG of commonsense knowledge, WordNet (Miller, 1995) into the Bert model (Devlin et al., 2018) is helpful, however, it will hurts the performace of XLNET (Yangetal.,2019), a more powerful pre-trained model. Our approaches achieve the state-of-the-art results on both shared task’s official test data, outperforming all the other submissions.